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By McClatchy-Tribune | October 14, 2007
Creating the ambience of a campfire with a fire pit is one of the hottest trends in backyard recreation. Jim Jarvis of Weatherford, Texas, owner of an online fire-pit accessories company, says the trend was sparked by the clay chimeneas that started showing up in Mexican import stores a few years back. Alex Bandon, multimedia editor of This Old House magazine, helped show readers how to build a fire pit from cast-concrete stone for about $500 in the September issue. "People are turning their yards into outdoor rooms, and a fire pit is better than a barbecue because it's generally circular, which makes it very social."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
At the start of Bram Stoker's 1897 novel "Dracula," a London lawyer named Harker visits Transylvania to facilitate a real estate deal for a mysterious count who desires new digs in England. Not anything freshly built, or even modestly rehabbed, mind you. Something old and crumbling will do fine, along the lines of the count's longtime castle, with its "dark window openings" and "frowning walls" that form "a jagged line against the sky. " Harker has found just the thing, he tells the count, an "ancient structure, built of heavy stones," a property that "has not been repaired for a large number of years" and has many trees that "make it in places gloomy.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 13, 2005
Music and mansions go together nicely. Something about the richness of a great composition and the richness of a grand residence can create an awfully inviting ambience - especially when you don't have to be even tenuously connected to high society to savor it. There was a promising turnout Sunday afternoon at the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion on Mount Vernon Place for the opening of a new concert series there by the Largely Ludwig Chamber Ensemble. That same afternoon, a large crowd packed two salons and spilled over onto a side porch of the mansion at the Cylburn Arboretum to hear the first of what is projected to become an annual presentation there.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case | August 7, 2013
It's a rare feeling to love a bar as soon as you walk through the door. With its quiet charm, Beatnik, a new Station North bar, delivered it almost immediately on a recent Saturday night. Beatnik's precisely executed details, both small and significant, left a lasting impression. For a bar that opened in mid-July, it seemed confident, like its owners were fully committed to creating a cool, unpretentious hangout for Station North art types. But you don't need to be a regular at Club K or the Crown, both music venues close to Beatnik, to appreciate what's going on here.
FEATURES
By David Gonzales and David Gonzales,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 13, 1997
Summer has arrived, and you're lusting for a long, lazy, meandering road trip. This yearning is endemic to our culture; its roots are snarled inexorably in our childhoods, when we learned that summer means a fully loaded family station wagon, long days spent over four humming wheels and new worlds explored at a leisurely, parentally mandated pace.Go. Submit to your road-lust. But this time, skip bland motels and crowded campgrounds for hostels. In any of North America's 250-plus hostels, you'll find laughably low prices, local ambience, the comforts of home, more information than you'll ever find in roadside visitor centers and fellow travelers as enamored of the open road as you are. Instead of staring at a TV or slapping mosquitoes in a sagging tent, you'll trade travel tips, recount adventures and banish, with new acquaintances, the ennui of the empty road.
NEWS
July 22, 1996
CITY RESIDENTS become so discouraged by all that is bad about their towns that they take too little comfort in what is good. And suburbanites, who can't help but notice city dwellers' immersion in urban woes, decide isolation is the best way to avoid contagion. But situations often are neither as bad nor as good as they appear.The laundry list of urban ills affecting Baltimore, for example, seems unbearable if not placed in context. Solving those problems is not impossible, given the right leadership.
NEWS
December 8, 1992
BY NOW, we're all familiar with the acronym NIMBY -- the "Not in My Back Yard" sentiment shared by a growing number of citizens.Members of this not-so-exclusive group seem to be everywhere these days, objecting to anything going into their neighborhood that might destroy the ambience -- and even more to the point, the property value -- of an area.Prisons are definitely a no-no to this group, as are landfills, massive residential developments, incinerators, houses for retarded citizens, convenience stores, homes for abused spouses and even in some cases -- as illustrated recently in Hunt Valley -- churches.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
Welcome to Classic Country, Carroll County. While rapid transit rushes people to work or the SST carries them off to faraway lands, you can still stroll unjostled along the quiet sidewalks of historic Uniontown.While computers whir out statistics in staccato, you can reflect on yesterday's technology at the Farm Museum. Carroll has managed to retain its peaceful, rural heritage in the midst of its 20th century approach to living.This ambience makes Carroll a welcome respite for visitors and residents alike.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1997
There are three things I love: a hot, sunshiny day, that day off and a plate of tangy, tender barbecue ribs. Thanks to El Nino and three local rib joints, the only thing I couldn't get this week was a day off. The ribs almost made up for it.I never did find my ideal ribs -- which I define as having a bold hickory smoke taste, a tart sauce fit to clear a throat or open a nostril. But after many hours spent over plates of juicy ribs, I have three tasty recommendations worth the drive and the price.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1995
For eight years, Bob Rosen and Marty Lonergan lived in France, India and Thailand but longed for a taste of Americana they insist they can only get in West Friendship.The two Washingtonians got it yesterday at the Howard County Fair, which began its 50th summer celebration of the county's agricultural heritage."This is the America we longed for," said Ms. Lonergan, 46. "Not Washington, D.C., not people walking down the street with their briefcases."There were no briefcases in sight yesterday as the fair opened with Preview Day, a time for aspiring and experienced shepherds, seamstresses, horticulturalists and herders to enter their exhibits in the annual competitions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2013
Ozra, a Persian-Mediterranean restaurant, has opened, quietly, in Little Italy.  Ozra's formal opening, according to co-owner Reza Holland, is July 26. Until then, Holland said, the restaurant will be asking in friends and family, but curious passersby are being welcomed in to dine as well. Ozra occupies a long-shuttered Stiles Street location that longtime Little Italy residents will remember as the Impallaria/Gramigna Bakery. Holland and his partner, Mahrdad "Max" Tabasi, purchased the building in 2009 and have spent the last two-and-a-half years completely renovating the property.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Annapolis Elementary School is the oldest and longest continuously used public school in the state, a two-building gem in the city's historic district. As the Anne Arundel Board of Education signed off on its revitalization project, it lauded plans that ensure that the two-structure facility maintains its historical ambience. Annapolis Elementary was one of two area schools the board voted to improve at Wednesday's meeting. It also voted to adopt designs to modernize the Germantown Elementary School for use by the Phoenix Annapolis Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2010
I never made it to the Wild Orchid's original home, a free-standing white bungalow in the cozy Eastport neighborhood of Annapolis, but by most accounts, the setup there was charming and intimate. The homey atmosphere was apparently one of the reasons folks recommended Jim and Karen Wilder's upscale American bistro, and in 16 years, the Wild Orchid developed a quiet but sizable following. Jump to this past summer, when the Wilders moved their operations to the Severn Bank Building on Westgate Circle into a space where a Greystone Grill had come and gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2010
Over on the Dining@Large blog, we talk often about the relative importance we put on atmosphere, food, and service. In a typical exchange, one commenter will insist that he'd sacrifice a little food quality for great ambience and service; another will swear the opposite. There's a wide range of opinion, and I suspect that happy marriages happen when there's a meeting of the minds on this issue. Geckos, I think, is Exhibit A for the defenders of great atmosphere/good enough food.
FEATURES
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2009
Geisha is one of the few restaurants I can think of that looks better during the daytime than at night. Geisha's dining rooms are below ground level, down a flight of stairs from its entrance on Charles Street, and at night you can feel a little sad in them, as though you've been confined to the basement while adults are having a party upstairs. By day, though, the room's rusts, cherries and ambers resolve themselves handsomely along clean midcentury lines, and the ambience feels more intentional, like an executive dining room.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2009
Sushi Sakura occupies the Pikesville location where Fortune House Chinese restaurant was for a short time. Before that, it was a forward-looking and ambitious Chinese restaurant named Try's Asian Fusion that I admired but never went back to after I reviewed it. I had, in fact, come to review Fortune House a few months ago, but it was "closed for painting." Fortune House, it turned out, was being converted into Sushi Sakura, a perfectly nice Japanese restaurant that I didn't take to at all, in spite of the fact that the food it serves is comparable to what I've enjoyed in similar restaurants for years.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 26, 2001
A delightful musical homecoming occurred under the stars Saturday night when the Charles Carroll House of Annapolis presented a recital by cellist Rupert Thompson. Thompson, a 1986 graduate of Annapolis High School, proved himself a consummate musician as he performed in his first full-length recital in his hometown. The recital included full-length sonatas by Bach, Beethoven, Brahms and Debussy, plus Thompson's own "Fanfare for the Common Slave." Thompson's brief, unaccompanied narrative was inspired by the Carroll estate, where involuntary servitude flourished during America's formative decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2013
Ozra, a Persian-Mediterranean restaurant, has opened, quietly, in Little Italy.  Ozra's formal opening, according to co-owner Reza Holland, is July 26. Until then, Holland said, the restaurant will be asking in friends and family, but curious passersby are being welcomed in to dine as well. Ozra occupies a long-shuttered Stiles Street location that longtime Little Italy residents will remember as the Impallaria/Gramigna Bakery. Holland and his partner, Mahrdad "Max" Tabasi, purchased the building in 2009 and have spent the last two-and-a-half years completely renovating the property.
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