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By J.D. Considine | December 19, 1996
Making ends meet as a professional musician is tough enough, but a few hearty souls actually make a go of two simultaneous careers. Grace Griffith is one such singer. On her own, she bridges British and American folk traditions with impressive ease (just listen to the magic she works with George Gershwin's "Summertime" on her solo album, "Grace"). But when she works with Cathy Palmer in Connemara, she leans much more to the Celtic side of things, stressing traditional folk tunes and recording with the likes of accordion whiz Billy McComisky.
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October 18, 2011
CrossFit Laurel is teaming with Mammograms In Action, a Southern California-based nonprofit, to host a unique athletic competition. Barbells for Boobs - Amazing "Grace" will help raise funds in the fight against breast cancer, both locally and nationwide. CrossFit athletes from throughout the area will meet Sunday, Oct. 23 at 10 a.m., in the workout room at 701 Montgomery St. to compete in a "Grace" workout, with ground to overhead weightlifting movement. Residents are invited to join in the fundraiser.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Betsy Sharkey and Tribune newspapers | January 15, 2010
We're always looking for those performances that truly define an actor, when we can sit back and simply watch the talent soar. For Colin Firth, "A Single Man" is that film. Until now probably best known for his work in the "Bridget Jones" films - the stuffy, sensitive suitor forever in the shadow of Hugh Grant's roguish charmer - his portrayal of George, the single man that he imbues with amazing grace, should change all that. George is 52, a Briton transplanted to L.A., where he's been an English professor for years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Betsy Sharkey and Tribune newspapers | January 15, 2010
We're always looking for those performances that truly define an actor, when we can sit back and simply watch the talent soar. For Colin Firth, "A Single Man" is that film. Until now probably best known for his work in the "Bridget Jones" films - the stuffy, sensitive suitor forever in the shadow of Hugh Grant's roguish charmer - his portrayal of George, the single man that he imbues with amazing grace, should change all that. George is 52, a Briton transplanted to L.A., where he's been an English professor for years.
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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | September 12, 1990
If you want to know why Bill Moyers has retreated to the lofty confines of PBS, look no further than the 90 minutes he has on tonight.While the commercial networks scramble for high ratings amid increasing competition and have their news personnel searching for the hottest topic for some cutting edge documentary, Moyers gets to do 90 minutes about a hymn."
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 23, 2007
Amazing Grace, a worshipful film biography of British abolitionist William Wilberforce, uses his quest to outlaw slavery to attack the complacency that allows the practice to persist today as child prostitution or forced labor. But the movie is so reverent that it registers as little more than a pageant of outrage and uplift. Another hymn or two and it might turn into a musical along the lines of Les Miserables. In the course of the film's plush, well-paced two hours, the English anti-slavery movement ebbs when international tensions in general and the French Revolution in particular engender paranoia about any kind of protest.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt and Dolly Merritt,Special to The Sun | April 23, 1995
Toting his Bible and guitar, Charles Palmer has arrived at the Lorien Nursing and Convalescent Home almost every Thursday morning for the past 17 years.Plucking out tunes of old familiar hymns such as "Amazing Grace" and "The Old Rugged Cross," the 69-year-old Ellicott City resident leads a low-keyed gospel hour that includes sing-alongs, Scripture readings, speakers and testimonies that can draw as many as 60 nursing home residents."They are family to me. We help each other," said Mr. Palmer, a member of Arlington Baptist Church in Baltimore.
NEWS
By MICHAEL NELSON | September 15, 1991
Talking is hard and getting harder, even for those of us who care less about being politically correct than we do about being merely polite.Who hasn't stammered occasionally in the effort to keep up with the new, as yet unwritten language rules?: "He -- or she -- must decide for himself or herself. . . ;" "Blacks, er, Afro, er, African Americans. . . ;" "My nephew is handicapped, I mean, physically challenged. . . ;" and so on.What is the late 20th century American who cares about the mother (is that OK?
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 4, 2001
At a time when many Howard County churches are prospering, it can be easy to forget the many Baltimore parishes in need. T. Milton Nelson, a member of The Lutheran Church of the Living Word at Columbia's Oakland Mills Interfaith Center, has not forgotten the city poor. Honored Sunday with the Lutheran Church's Delaware-Maryland Synod Social Ministry Service Award for the Baltimore West Conference, Nelson has reached out during the past three years to be a partner with Amazing Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church of East Baltimore.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1997
On a bright Sunday morning in 1985, the Rev. Teresa Martin-Minnich had just concluded a tightly reasoned, intellectual sermon before the sea of well-to-do white faces at Baltimore's Roland Park Presbyterian Church.Then something totally unexpected occurred.A large, strikingly handsome African-American woman with a leonine mane of jet black hair suddenly rose to her feet and, without a trace of self-consciousness, burst into song.Amazing Grace, How sweet the soundThat saved a wretch like me!
NEWS
April 2, 2008
On March 30, 2008, GRACE MARIE "Amazing Grace" (nee Tully), age, 97, Born February 14, 1911. Beloved wife of the late William Daniel Vain Sr., devoted and cherished mother of Delores Stamathis, Grace Marie Scheihing, Joyce Ann Kelly, Lisa Rager, William Vain Jr., John, Thomas, James, Patrick, Joseph, Henry, and the late Bruce Vain. Dear friend of Jesse, Evelyn and Stella. Also survived by 18 grandchildren and many great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. Relatives and friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Road, on Tuesday and Wednesday 3-5 and 7-9pm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | April 26, 2007
One solo changed Lin McEwan's life. About 10 years ago, as a sophomore at St. Paul's School for Girls, McEwan sang "Amazing Grace" at a school gospel show and received a standing ovation. Her uniquely low voice struck a chord with the crowd, and their overwhelming response sparked an interest that later led McEwan to pursue a career in music. "That was it," said McEwan, whose real name is Linda Thieman. "From then on, it was pretty much my passion." In the next few days, the Baltimore native will perform twice in the area.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach and Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critics | March 16, 2007
Capsules by film critics Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. 300, -- a blood-strewn retelling of that apotheosis of Spartan military glory, the Battle of Thermopylae, is the best example yet of the movie-as-comic-book. Based on a graphic novel by Frank Miller, whose testosterone-soaked storytelling has made him a genre favorite, 300 captures not only the look and feel of its source material, but its essence as well. Gerard Butler is the Spartan King Leonidas, leading a band of 300 impossibly buff warriors, clad in little more than thongs, to take on the invading Persians at Thermopylae, where sure death - and even surer glory - await.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun Reporter | February 25, 2007
Michael Apted sits in a posh, sunlit Washington hotel room discussing his film Amazing Grace, which opened this weekend, anticipating what questions may arise out of his approach to the 19th-century abolitionist tale. Surely, he believes, some detractors are bound to ask: Why make a film about Britain's slave trade in Africa with virtually no slavery scenes and only one black main character? "I'll have to eat that," says Apted, who says he's also braced for those who will scoff at his nearly all-English cast, with few box-office notables.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 23, 2007
Amazing Grace, a worshipful film biography of British abolitionist William Wilberforce, uses his quest to outlaw slavery to attack the complacency that allows the practice to persist today as child prostitution or forced labor. But the movie is so reverent that it registers as little more than a pageant of outrage and uplift. Another hymn or two and it might turn into a musical along the lines of Les Miserables. In the course of the film's plush, well-paced two hours, the English anti-slavery movement ebbs when international tensions in general and the French Revolution in particular engender paranoia about any kind of protest.
FEATURES
February 16, 2007
AMAZING GRACE -- (Samuel Goldwyn Films and Roadside Attractions) Michael Apted's drama about ending slavery in the British Empire. Ioan Gruffudd and Romola Garai star. THE ASTRONAUT FARMER -- (Warner Bros.) Billy Bob Thornton is an astronaut who retires to save the family homestead - but still keeps his rocket dreams alive. LITTLE CHILDREN -- (New Line Cinema) Todd Field adapts Tom Perrotta's novel about stay-at-home parents (Kate Winslet, Patrick Wilson) who have an affair to assuage their anxieties.
NEWS
By Chauncey Mabe and Chauncey Mabe,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | November 19, 1995
"Amazing Grace," by Jonathan Kozol. Crown. 286 Pages. $23The author's latest book is his most subdued, with little of the overt righteous outrage of his earlier works. Instead, he uses a more narrative, less didactic prose style to introduce readers to individual children who are being destroyed by poverty. He steps aside and allows society's victims to speak for themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | August 27, 1998
Amazing' concertHear a unique, live rendition of "Amazing Grace" as 188 Maryland singers and musicians take the stage Saturday in Patterson Park. Musical acts including Deanna Bogart, the Charlie Parker Band, Fat Apple Band, Lloyd Marcus, Sir Rod, Toby Hurwitz and others, joined earlier this year, in the name of charity, to record a 3 1/2-minute version of "Amazing Grace" that incorporated rock, gospel, country, pop, rap and jazz singing.All of the original performers will play their own music in the concert in Patterson Park and then join together for a stirring finale of "Amazing Grace."
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | February 15, 2007
One of the more popular lines in the hymn "Amazing Grace" is "that saved a wretch like me." It alluded to author and former slave trader John Newton's deep introspection after turning away from the heinous practice. Yet in some modern renditions, it appears that calling oneself a wretch is a bit much for some people. Some churches use hymnals that have rewritten the line as, "that saved and set me free," perhaps believing that softer language would be more palatable. The amended version has prompted dismay among some.
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