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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | May 14, 1994
Virginia R. Pettijohn, an amateur radio operator who met her future husband via short wave radio, died Tuesday of heart failure at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Glen Arm resident was 75.In 1990, she married Francis J. Pettijohn, a professor emeritus of geology at the Johns Hopkins University who operated ham radio station WB3CBC and shared her interest in radio."Her call letters were W3UWT, and even though she lived in Glen Arm and I lived in Towson, not by any means a long distance transmission, I liked the sound of her voice," Mr. Pettijohn said.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | August 5, 2009
Arthur Edward Goldman, a retired National Security Agency employee, died of melanoma Friday at his Columbia home. He was 67. Born in Scranton, Pa., he earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Scranton and a master's degree from American University. He also did postgraduate work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Mr. Goldman joined the Air Force in 1964 and served as a communications officer. He worked for nearly 30 years at the National Security Agency at Fort Meade and retired in 1998.
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NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 2004
Tom Smith drove from Annapolis to attend the Amateur Radio and Computer Show held Saturday at the Howard County Fairgrounds. "I've got probably a dozen projects going," Smith said as he poked among wires and other gadgets, looking for items he needs for his radios. The show, put on every year by the Columbia Amateur Radio Association, typically attracts about 2,000 visitors and maybe a hundred vendors, according to John King, vice president of the Columbia organization, which has about 80 members.
NEWS
March 8, 2009
Banneker-Douglass March events The Banneker-Douglass Museum, 84 Franklin St., Annapolis, has planned a number of activities for March. * What Does All This Mean? Archaeology, Interpretation and Exhibits Homeschool Program: 9 a.m. to noon Thursday at Historic London Town and Gardens, 839 Londontown Road, Edgewater; and Friday at the museum, for ages 8 to 16, $20. Children will learn about African-Americans who lived and worked at the county almshouse. * Faith of Our Fathers, Living Still - A Children's Hands-on Workshop: 10 a.m. to noon March 21, ages 5 and up, $3 (drop-in, but registration requested)
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2004
At the Greater Baltimore Hamboree and Computerfest, one ham's junk is another ham's treasure. "Every ham has the idea, `I can take this and build something with it,'" said Rich Adamy of Alexandria, Va., who was on his knees yesterday marveling at a rickety-looking contraption called an inductor. "Unfortunately, a lot of stuff does end up in the basement never to be seen again." Adamy was one of thousands of amateur radio operators - or hams - who visited the expo at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium during the weekend.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 6, 2001
WHEN HE WAS 8 years old, Ryan Rose wanted to earn his amateur radio license. He'd watched his parents, both of whom are ham radio enthusiasts, talk with people all around the world and wanted to join in the fun. So Ryan's father, Bob Rose, took him to the Davidsonville home of the Anne Arundel Radio Club, where Ryan learned about transistors, atmospherics, satellites, FCC rules, Morse code and other things a licensed amateur radio operator needs to...
ENTERTAINMENT
By JAY APPERSON and JAY APPERSON,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1998
Doug Wittich presses a button and talks to the world."This is November Three Victor Echo Juliet in a classroom demonstration -- C-Q, C-Q, C-Q."He fiddles with the knob on his HF Allband Transceiver and cocks an ear to the radio's hiss and fizz. Finally, he finds a voice, and words that bring a rush of excitement: "Yes, this is Greece."In the Internet age, when static-free communication with strangers in distant lands can be just a keystroke away, one might think amateur radio would be going the way of the telegraph.
NEWS
October 9, 1990
Services for Ralph K. Huber, a retired network operations manager for the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co., will be held at 1:30 p.m. today at Christ Lutheran Church, 701 S. Charles St.Mr. Huber, who was 71 and lived on Ruxway Road in Ruxton, died Sunday at the Manor Care Towson Nursing and Rehabilitation Center of complications to a stroke.He retired eight years ago after working for the telephone company for 42 years. He was a member of the Telephone Pioneers of America.Born in Baltimore, he was a graduate of the Polytechnic Institute and studied engineering at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | August 5, 2009
Arthur Edward Goldman, a retired National Security Agency employee, died of melanoma Friday at his Columbia home. He was 67. Born in Scranton, Pa., he earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Scranton and a master's degree from American University. He also did postgraduate work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Mr. Goldman joined the Air Force in 1964 and served as a communications officer. He worked for nearly 30 years at the National Security Agency at Fort Meade and retired in 1998.
NEWS
January 2, 1993
Fred J. Friel Jr., a pioneer radio scientist, died Dec. 24 of kidney failure in North Arundel Hospital in Glen Burnie. He was 80.A Linthicum resident, Dr. Friel was born in Lexington, Ky. He graduated from the University of Kentucky in 1934 with degrees in electrical and mechanical engineering.He later attended the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Oxford University and received an honorary doctorate of science degree from the RCA Institutes. He taught electrical engineering at VPI and the University of Virginia.
NEWS
July 31, 2006
Vincent J. Fuller, 75, the star Washington attorney who defended would-be presidential assassin John Hinckley, died of lung cancer Wednesday at a hospice in Montgomery County. During his career, Mr. Fuller defended a number of notables, including boxer Mike Tyson and Teamsters Union boss Jimmy Hoffa. But he was best known for his successful insanity defense of Hinckley, who shot President Reagan, press secretary James Brady and two law enforcers outside a Washington hotel on March 30, 1981.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nikki Waller and Nikki Waller,KNIGHT RIDDER TRIBUNE | December 2, 2004
MIAMI - With pursed lips and a steady hand, WA4YDK spins the dial, searching for a voice or a signal somewhere amid the fuzz caused by solar flares and an especially low-hanging aurora borealis. Eventually, a voice crackles from the speaker: "Copy. Copy, WA4YDK." A connection made, WA4YDK - known outside radio land as Elliot Kleiman of Cooper City, Fla. - smiles faintly. Ham radio operators like Kleiman delight in moments like this. Kleiman, 67, has been a federally licensed amateur radio operator, or ham, for more than 50 years.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 2004
Tom Smith drove from Annapolis to attend the Amateur Radio and Computer Show held Saturday at the Howard County Fairgrounds. "I've got probably a dozen projects going," Smith said as he poked among wires and other gadgets, looking for items he needs for his radios. The show, put on every year by the Columbia Amateur Radio Association, typically attracts about 2,000 visitors and maybe a hundred vendors, according to John King, vice president of the Columbia organization, which has about 80 members.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2004
At the Greater Baltimore Hamboree and Computerfest, one ham's junk is another ham's treasure. "Every ham has the idea, `I can take this and build something with it,'" said Rich Adamy of Alexandria, Va., who was on his knees yesterday marveling at a rickety-looking contraption called an inductor. "Unfortunately, a lot of stuff does end up in the basement never to be seen again." Adamy was one of thousands of amateur radio operators - or hams - who visited the expo at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium during the weekend.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2004
Morse code is entering the 21st century - or at least the late 20th. The 160-year-old communication system has a new character to denote the "@" symbol used in e-mail addresses. In December, the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), which oversees the entire frequency spectrum, from amateur radio to satellites, voted to add the new character. The new sign, which will be known as a "commat," consists of the signals for "A" (dot-dash) and "C" (dash-dot-dash-dot), with no space between them.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2003
Robert Stewart Bennett, a retired electrical engineer and amateur radio operator, died in his sleep Saturday at his Towson home. The cause was unknown, but family members said he had suffered from high blood pressure. He was 67. Born in Baltimore and raised in Anneslie, he began his interest in amateur radio as a youth when he turned the metal springs of his bed into an antenna for his two-way radio. He was a 1954 graduate of Towson High School and earned his undergraduate degree and doctorate in electrical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University, where he later taught part time.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | September 13, 1994
Wilbur Roy "Bill" Bevan, a retired electronics engineer and amateur radio operator, died Wednesday of respiratory failure at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The Crownsville resident was 80.He worked on numerous classified defense projects for Westinghouse Electric Corp. from 1953 until his retirement in 1976. From 1967 to 1969, he was the director of the University of Michigan's Mount Haleakala observatory in Hawaii.The native of Holton, Kan., lived briefly in Pennsylvania then moved to Hammond, Ind., where he completed high school in 1933.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2002
C. S. Marie;, a retired engineer who helped design the optics for the first video camera to relay images of the moon and the Arctic ice cap, died Nov. 22 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at Northwest Hospital Center in Randallstown. The Pikesville resident, whose passions ranged from ham radio to bee keeping to Civil War history, was 84. Camille Stewart Marie; was born in 1918 in Babylon, N.Y., and was raised in Baltimore. He had received his first radio operator's license from the Federal Communications Commission by the time he graduated from St. Paul's School for Boys in 1936.
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