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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 11, 2011
Rosamond Einstein, a homemaker, died Monday at the Gilchrist Hospice Care of complications of a fall she suffered earlier this month. She was 94 and lived in Towson. Born Rosamond Cecilia Dyer in Baltimore and raised on Bateman Avenue, she was the only child of real estate developer Frank Dyer. She was a 1935 graduate of St. Joseph's High School in Emmitsburg. She earned a bachelor of arts in history at the College of Notre Dame in 1939. She married Jacob Einstein Jr., a newspaper editor and radio station operator, in 1942.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2011
Rosamond Einstein, a homemaker, died Monday at the Gilchrist Hospice Care of complications of a fall she suffered earlier this month. She was 94 and lived in Towson. Born Rosamond Cecilia Dyer in Baltimore and raised on Bateman Avenue, she was the only child of real estate developer Frank Dyer. She was a 1935 graduate of St. Joseph's High School in Emmitsburg. She earned a bachelor of arts in history at the College of Notre Dame in 1939. She married Jacob Einstein Jr., a newspaper editor and radio station operator, in 1942.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2001
Tatiana Hull, an amateur photographer and retired librarian, died Monday of an infection after surgery at Howard County General Hospital. She was 86 and lived in Columbia. Mrs. Hull was a reference li- brarian at Howard Community College from 1970 to 1983. She received first place in the Sunday Sun Magazine photo contest in 1978 for her picture of a granddaughter's first steps. "In the days before computers, she was good technically - in biology, math and all the sciences," Jean Soto of Columbia, a former co-worker, said about Mrs. Hull's work as a librarian.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2001
With the digital image explosion, more than a few snapshot amateurs have begun to ask the question: Will my inkjet prints last as long as those from a photo-finishing shop? The answer: probably not. Inkjet printer technology is so new that standards for creating ink and paper for recording images on them haven't been settled. All inkjet prints will fade over time because of air pollutants, humidity, light and temperature changes, among other things. So, at some point in the indeterminate future, that beautiful, sharp and colorful picture of Aunt Marge on the wall without a glass cover will lose some of that color and sharpness.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1998
David Osborne travels around the globe taking pictures of exotic landscapes. But it took switching his focus to an art class to show him a new world.Osborne spent three days in March at the Keswick Multi-Care Center in North Baltimore, photographing the center's disabled residents in an art class that he read about in The Sun. Twenty-two of his black-and-white photographs make up the exhibit "Hands at Keswick" at the Keswick Center.Osborne, a Columbia resident, is not a professional photographer, but his company, a specialty chemical distributor called International Resources, allows him to travel extensively.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2001
With the digital image explosion, more than a few snapshot amateurs have begun to ask the question: Will my inkjet prints last as long as those from a photo-finishing shop? The answer: probably not. Inkjet printer technology is so new that standards for creating ink and paper for recording images on them haven't been settled. All inkjet prints will fade over time because of air pollutants, humidity, light and temperature changes, among other things. So, at some point in the indeterminate future, that beautiful, sharp and colorful picture of Aunt Marge on the wall without a glass cover will lose some of that color and sharpness.
NEWS
December 9, 2007
ARNOLD HARDY, 85 Award-winning photographer Arnold Hardy, an amateur photographer who won a Pulitzer Prize for his gripping 1946 photo of a woman falling from a burning hotel, died Wednesday at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta of complications from hip surgery, according to A.S. Turner & Sons funeral home. He died just two days before the 61st anniversary of the Dec. 7, 1946, fire at Atlanta's Winecoff Hotel - a disaster that killed 119 people, more than any other hotel fire in U.S. history.
NEWS
July 19, 2006
On Monday, July 17, 2006, RAYMOND F. SMITH, age 81, of Owings Mills. Born February 17, 1925 in Portsmouth, OH, he was the son of the late Stanley and Lucina Giles Smith, his beloved wife of 53 years Betty Jane Smith died in 2001. Mr. Smith served honorably with US Army in WWII, he was a conductor with the Norfolk and Western Railroad in Portsmouth. Mr. Smith along with his friends were part of the coffee community at the local Starbuck in Owings Mills every morning. He was an avid jazz fan and amateur photographer and a horse racing enthusiast.
NEWS
January 9, 2005
ON December 29, 2004 The Reverend Mr. VERLE E. FRIDLEY, age 83 of Anderson, IN died from an extended illness. He was born on June 3, 1921 and raised in Middletown, IN. He was a minister for over 50 years in churches in Lufkin, TX; Hammond, LA; Bastrop, LA; Baltimore, MD; Mishawaka, IN; Milwaukee, WI; Flint MI; Clarkston, MI and Sumter, SC. He was at various times a member of Rotary Club and Kiwanis Club. He was an avid reader, dedicated Pastor and loving husband, father and grandfather.
NEWS
July 20, 2003
On July 13, 2003, DAVID JOHN KATSANIS, PhD, 76, at his home in Rochester, New York. A Philadelphia native who lived in Maryland for over 25 years. WWII Army veteran. Doctorate from Temple University. Retired from 31 years of civil service as a supervising physicist. Cited for service to the Army, the White House and the Secret Service. Recognized expert in the fields of small arms research and development and suppressive shields. Later chief physicist at Shielding Technologies. Authored patents and publications in the fields of ballistics, lasers, fluid dynamics, and suppressive shielding.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2001
Tatiana Hull, an amateur photographer and retired librarian, died Monday of an infection after surgery at Howard County General Hospital. She was 86 and lived in Columbia. Mrs. Hull was a reference li- brarian at Howard Community College from 1970 to 1983. She received first place in the Sunday Sun Magazine photo contest in 1978 for her picture of a granddaughter's first steps. "In the days before computers, she was good technically - in biology, math and all the sciences," Jean Soto of Columbia, a former co-worker, said about Mrs. Hull's work as a librarian.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1998
David Osborne travels around the globe taking pictures of exotic landscapes. But it took switching his focus to an art class to show him a new world.Osborne spent three days in March at the Keswick Multi-Care Center in North Baltimore, photographing the center's disabled residents in an art class that he read about in The Sun. Twenty-two of his black-and-white photographs make up the exhibit "Hands at Keswick" at the Keswick Center.Osborne, a Columbia resident, is not a professional photographer, but his company, a specialty chemical distributor called International Resources, allows him to travel extensively.
NEWS
April 28, 2005
Samuel Edward Wroten, a retired can company mechanic and World War II veteran, died of a heart attack Monday at Howard County General Hospital. He was 88 and moved to Ellicott City a year and a half ago after eight decades in Brooklyn Park. Born in Baltimore and raised on Heath Street, Mr. Wroten had an eighth-grade education before going to work at the old Federal Tin Co. in what is now the Inner Harbor area. He joined the Army during World War II and served as an auto mechanic. His service included duty in Germany.
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