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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 19, 1999
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Gary Hug got a telescope for Christmas years ago, and now he and a friend are going down in astronomical history.Hug, 49, of Topeka, Kan., and Graham Bell, 64, of Maple Hill, Kan., have discovered a comet. The two amateur astronomers saw it early one morning two weeks ago while peering into a dark sky from the Far Point Observatory, 20 miles from Topeka."I've been looking for comets off and on for about 25 years," Hug said. "It was a terrific thrill."The find was announced by the International Astronomical Union, the world's leading astronomical organization, after professional astronomers confirmed it.The Hug-Bell comet, as it has been named, could well be the faintest comet ever discovered by an amateur, as Hug and Bell believe, said Brian Marsden, a member of the union and director of the Minor Planet Center at the Harvard/Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
Comet ISON, a rare type of comet from outside the solar system, has brightened "considerably" in recent days and could be on the cusp of visibility to the naked eye in the night sky, scientists say. Scientists are calling on the astronomy community and amateur skywatchers to closely monitor the comet as it nears a close pass by the sun later this month. They want to see whether the comet continues to brighten, and what that could mean is happening to it. Astronomers have been tracking ISON since last September, when  scientists from Belarus and Russia who are part of an international collaboration called the International Scientific Optical Network spotted its faint impression on images captured by a telescope near Kislovodsk, Russia.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2003
Late at night, far out on the Eastern Shore where the glare from Maryland's urban corridor dwindles, a wild profusion of stars shines. On a starlit ball field in Tuckahoe State Park, near Hillsboro, a coven of amateur astronomers has gathered on this moonless autumn night to turn their telescopes and their imaginations to the heavens. "That's a nice-looking sky up there," Don Surles says softly, amid a clamor of unseen crickets, cicadas and hoot-owls. He surveys the bright trail of the Milky Way that spans the sky, stepping carefully among the darkened shapes of dozens of fellow stargazers and their upturned telescopes.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | October 10, 2007
Joel Goodman became fascinated with the majesty of the skies when he was about 7 years old, and President John F. Kennedy vowed to send a man to the moon by the end of the 1960s. A 54-year-old dentist and Clarksville resident, Goodman purchased his first telescope in 1990 and joined HAL -- the Howard Astronomical League -- in 2000, about a year after it was created. On a recent warm night, Goodman and about 40 other members of the club, a nonprofit organization for amateur astronomers, had set up telescopes in Alpha Ridge Park and were waiting for the sun to set so they could begin to search out their favorite celestial delights.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 2003
Mars is closer to Earth than it will be for several hundred years, a celestial event that has turned scores of people into amateur astronomers. Last week, many of them met at the Glenwood library branch for a better look at the Red Planet and other wonders of the night sky. The session was sponsored by the library and the Howard Astronomical League, a nonprofit organization of about 100 members. The amateur astronomers hold meetings, star parties and astronomy lessons, all of which are open to the public.
NEWS
By Ralph Vartabedian and Lianne Hart and Ralph Vartabedian and Lianne Hart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2003
HOUSTON - Investigators of the Columbia disaster showed a nearly complete video yesterday of the space shuttle's flight from the California coastline to its breakup over east Texas, a mosaic assembled from about 15 clips shot by amateur astronomers early on the morning of Feb. 1. The video, along with other testimony given at a hearing held by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, provides additional evidence that the obiter began burning up even...
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | June 23, 1995
If you've ever wanted to ask an astronomer to explain black holes, or the big bang, or to tell you why looking out into space is the same as looking back in time, get to College Park this weekend.The University of Maryland is host to "Universe '95," a two-day national astronomy festival designed mostly for amateur astronomers, backyard stargazers and people who are just plain curious.Among the attractions:* An "Ask the Astronomer" exhibit. Astronomers from the staff of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore will answer questions about the Hubble Space Telescope and the cosmos.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | October 10, 2007
Joel Goodman became fascinated with the majesty of the skies when he was about 7 years old, and President John F. Kennedy vowed to send a man to the moon by the end of the 1960s. A 54-year-old dentist and Clarksville resident, Goodman purchased his first telescope in 1990 and joined HAL -- the Howard Astronomical League -- in 2000, about a year after it was created. On a recent warm night, Goodman and about 40 other members of the club, a nonprofit organization for amateur astronomers, had set up telescopes in Alpha Ridge Park and were waiting for the sun to set so they could begin to search out their favorite celestial delights.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | October 7, 1992
Nine star-struck back yard astronomers came to Baltimore this week to prepare to use one of the world's most powerful telescopes, NASA's $2.1 billion Hubble orbiting observatory, for research that strays off the beaten path."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | November 19, 1990
With war looming in the Persian Gulf, it may seem ominous that the planet Mars -- named for the Roman god of war -- looms bigger and brighter in the nighttime sky this month than any other object except the moon.But it's no omen, astronomers say, just the mechanical spinning of the solar system. And star gazers wielding everything from binoculars to the Hubble Space Telescope are drawing a bead on Mars for their last best view of the Red Planet in this century.Tonight, the Earth makes its closest pass by Mars until the year 2001, coming within 47.4 million miles of Mars as we pass between it and the sun.This encounter isn't the closest in recent years.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 2003
Mars is closer to Earth than it will be for several hundred years, a celestial event that has turned scores of people into amateur astronomers. Last week, many of them met at the Glenwood library branch for a better look at the Red Planet and other wonders of the night sky. The session was sponsored by the library and the Howard Astronomical League, a nonprofit organization of about 100 members. The amateur astronomers hold meetings, star parties and astronomy lessons, all of which are open to the public.
NEWS
By Ralph Vartabedian and Lianne Hart and Ralph Vartabedian and Lianne Hart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2003
HOUSTON - Investigators of the Columbia disaster showed a nearly complete video yesterday of the space shuttle's flight from the California coastline to its breakup over east Texas, a mosaic assembled from about 15 clips shot by amateur astronomers early on the morning of Feb. 1. The video, along with other testimony given at a hearing held by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, provides additional evidence that the obiter began burning up even...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2003
Late at night, far out on the Eastern Shore where the glare from Maryland's urban corridor dwindles, a wild profusion of stars shines. On a starlit ball field in Tuckahoe State Park, near Hillsboro, a coven of amateur astronomers has gathered on this moonless autumn night to turn their telescopes and their imaginations to the heavens. "That's a nice-looking sky up there," Don Surles says softly, amid a clamor of unseen crickets, cicadas and hoot-owls. He surveys the bright trail of the Milky Way that spans the sky, stepping carefully among the darkened shapes of dozens of fellow stargazers and their upturned telescopes.
NEWS
June 12, 2000
Joseph Adrian Hall, a longtime auditor for the state tax department and an amateur astronomer, died yesterday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson of complications from cancer. He was 82. Born in Baltimore, Mr. Hall grew up in Hamilton and graduated from City College. During World War II, he was an Army corporal and served for three years in the Persian Gulf command, keeping Russia supplied to fight the Germans, said his wife of 32 years, the former Shirley Armstrong. In 1943, a Russian officer promised his outfit "a medal of appreciation for their work in transporting war material to Russia," said his wife.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 19, 1999
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Gary Hug got a telescope for Christmas years ago, and now he and a friend are going down in astronomical history.Hug, 49, of Topeka, Kan., and Graham Bell, 64, of Maple Hill, Kan., have discovered a comet. The two amateur astronomers saw it early one morning two weeks ago while peering into a dark sky from the Far Point Observatory, 20 miles from Topeka."I've been looking for comets off and on for about 25 years," Hug said. "It was a terrific thrill."The find was announced by the International Astronomical Union, the world's leading astronomical organization, after professional astronomers confirmed it.The Hug-Bell comet, as it has been named, could well be the faintest comet ever discovered by an amateur, as Hug and Bell believe, said Brian Marsden, a member of the union and director of the Minor Planet Center at the Harvard/Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1997
In the west, the comet appeared from a crystal-blue sky over the Hyatt Regency Hotel. In the east, the soon-to-be-eclipsed full moon, reddish Mars riding above it, rose over the Rusty Scupper restaurant.And peering at the sky through a forest of streetlights were hundreds of people celebrating what promised to be one of the great evenings in the history of urban astronomy, until clouds rolled in to eclipse the eclipse.It was a night for amateurs, the folks who ordinarily wouldn't know Hale-Bopp from be-bop and are a little hazy on how a light-year is different from a regular year.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
Comet ISON, a rare type of comet from outside the solar system, has brightened "considerably" in recent days and could be on the cusp of visibility to the naked eye in the night sky, scientists say. Scientists are calling on the astronomy community and amateur skywatchers to closely monitor the comet as it nears a close pass by the sun later this month. They want to see whether the comet continues to brighten, and what that could mean is happening to it. Astronomers have been tracking ISON since last September, when  scientists from Belarus and Russia who are part of an international collaboration called the International Scientific Optical Network spotted its faint impression on images captured by a telescope near Kislovodsk, Russia.
NEWS
June 12, 2000
Joseph Adrian Hall, a longtime auditor for the state tax department and an amateur astronomer, died yesterday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson of complications from cancer. He was 82. Born in Baltimore, Mr. Hall grew up in Hamilton and graduated from City College. During World War II, he was an Army corporal and served for three years in the Persian Gulf command, keeping Russia supplied to fight the Germans, said his wife of 32 years, the former Shirley Armstrong. In 1943, a Russian officer promised his outfit "a medal of appreciation for their work in transporting war material to Russia," said his wife.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | June 23, 1995
If you've ever wanted to ask an astronomer to explain black holes, or the big bang, or to tell you why looking out into space is the same as looking back in time, get to College Park this weekend.The University of Maryland is host to "Universe '95," a two-day national astronomy festival designed mostly for amateur astronomers, backyard stargazers and people who are just plain curious.Among the attractions:* An "Ask the Astronomer" exhibit. Astronomers from the staff of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore will answer questions about the Hubble Space Telescope and the cosmos.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | October 7, 1992
Nine star-struck back yard astronomers came to Baltimore this week to prepare to use one of the world's most powerful telescopes, NASA's $2.1 billion Hubble orbiting observatory, for research that strays off the beaten path."
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