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December 17, 2000
Q. My sister gave me an amaryllis plant on Thanksgiving, and I want to know how to get it to bloom. A. Keep the growing medium and the bottom of the amaryllis bulb moist. Be careful not to over-water, or your bulb may rot. Move your plant into a sunny location once you notice the first flower bud forming. Don't throw your amaryllis in the compost pile when it's finished blooming. Keep it watered and fertilized with a soluble plant food, and set it outdoors during the summer months. Bring your amaryllis inside in early fall to give it a rest.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Do I have to cut up fallen leaves with a mower before I use them as mulch? I don't have a mulching mower. No, you don't. In fact, many beneficial insects overwinter in leaf litter. You'll notice that no one chops up the fallen leaves in a woods, yet the layer of leaves decomposes before the next autumn. You can also chop with a regular lawn mower. How late can I put down fertilizer? The latest is Nov. 15, according to the new Maryland law. Generally, fertilizer is applied twice in the fall, 0.9 poundsb of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet each time in September and October.
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NEWS
By KAREN ZAUTYK and KAREN ZAUTYK,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 1996
"Sporting With Amaryllis," by Paul West. Overlook Press. 160 pages. $19.95There is one reaction I often have when confronted with works of genius. It is namely: well, duh.Sorry to burden you with that current cliche, sorry not to be more creative, but having just completed Paul West's "Sporting With Amaryllis" I am so daunted by the obvious power of his intellect and lyrical style , I tremble at the thought of seeing my own words on paper, such poor pathetic mewlings as they may be. Besides, I have a headache from trying to figure out what the hell he's talking about.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
What do I do with the stalk on my amaryllis, now that the flowers are gone? Will it flower again? The stalk will wither and die, but allow it to transport its carbohydrates down to feed the bulb before you cut it off. When it's yellow, remove it. Give the bulb plenty of sunlight (not direct if it's outside in the summer) and fertilize until fall to bulk up the bulb again. Then you have two choices. You can make it go dormant for a few weeks by withholding water and sun, then resume water and sunlight, aiming for a winter holiday bloom again.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2009
I bought an amaryllis in a glass jar on sale. It grew leaves and a flower without roots or water. I was told to leave it alone and let the leaves die. Will it bloom next year? Your amaryllis had a huge quantity of stored energy and moisture in its bulb in order to flower without water. Now the bulb is depleted. It cannot sprout again without renewing its reserves. To help it bulk up, plant your bulb in a pot, keeping the top 1/3 of the bulb above the soil line. Slowly move it into bright sunlight so the leaves can carry on photosynthesis and manufacture carbohydrates.
FEATURES
December 28, 1997
My sister gave me an amaryllis plant on Thanksgiving and I want to know how to get it to bloom.Keep the growing media and the bottom of the amaryllis bulb moist. Be careful not to overwater or your bulb may rot. Move your plant into a sunny location once you notice the first flower bud forming.Don't throw your amaryllis in the compost pile when it's finished blooming. Keep it watered and fertilized with a water-soluble plant food and set it outdoors during the summer months. Bring it back inside in early fall to give it a rest.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | November 30, 2003
Victorian playwright Oscar Wilde once said he could resist anything but temptation. Around the holidays, many people feel that way about amaryllis. We want them all -- the giant Dutch hybrids with blooms as big as soup bowls, the elegant singles with softly shaded petals like something out of a Vermeer painting, the miniatures (a relative term when it comes to amaryllis), the delicate Cybisters, and the gaudy doubles that are wildly ruffled and splashed with color. Years ago, amaryllis were known for their one-note color schemes.
NEWS
By Kathy Van Mullekom and Kathy Van Mullekom,DAILY PRESS | November 19, 2006
Now is time to pot up amaryllis bulbs so you have a succession of flowers beginning the next few weeks - just in time for your holiday decorating. To get a steady stream of flowers until spring, stagger the times you plant bulbs in decorative containers that will brighten your indoor decor. "It may be surprising to learn that amaryllis varieties don't all come to flower in the same time frame," says Sally Ferguson with the Netherlands Flower Bulb Information Center in Vermont. "Some varieties flower very quickly in around four to six weeks.
FEATURES
By Nancy Baggett and Nancy Baggett,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 1997
If part of your pleasure in the holiday season comes from festively decorating your house or making your own gifts, consider adopting a new custom: growing amaryllis.These showy, trumpet-shaped flowers herald the season and add holiday cheer in a way none of the more traditional plants can, particularly if you choose vivid red, white or peppermint-striped varieties. Presented in a handsome ceramic pot, a blooming amaryllis bulb also makes a thoughtful (and gorgeous) gift. And it's both easy and fun to raise these bulbs at home.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser | November 12, 2006
Many of this column's readers have watched an amaryllis emerge from its hard bulb to flower. To me they seem unworldly, perhaps a little dangerous, like a wild bird you don't want to get too close to. Here Connie Wanek of Duluth, Minn., takes a close and playful look at an amaryllis that looks right back at her. - Ted Kooser "Amaryllis" A flower needs to be this size to conceal the winter window, and this color, the red of a Fiat with the top down, to impress us, dull as we've grown.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer , susan.reimer@baltsun.com | December 3, 2009
I am not sure whether it's gardeners anxious to extend the growing season - or those who market to gardeners - but paperwhite and amaryllis bulb kits are stacked for sale like fruitcakes at this time of year. These are the bulbs that can be "forced" to bloom out of season without the months-long hibernation required by tulips, hyacinths and their kin, and they provide a welcome alternative to the ubiquitous poinsettia. According to the National Garden Association, 4.9 million households purchased bulbs for forcing last year - up from 4.1 million in 2007.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2009
I bought an amaryllis in a glass jar on sale. It grew leaves and a flower without roots or water. I was told to leave it alone and let the leaves die. Will it bloom next year? Your amaryllis had a huge quantity of stored energy and moisture in its bulb in order to flower without water. Now the bulb is depleted. It cannot sprout again without renewing its reserves. To help it bulk up, plant your bulb in a pot, keeping the top 1/3 of the bulb above the soil line. Slowly move it into bright sunlight so the leaves can carry on photosynthesis and manufacture carbohydrates.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | November 29, 2008
And you thought gardening was for gentle souls. What about forcing bulbs to bloom when they're trying to sleep? In the case of paperwhites and amaryllis, don't fret. They don't sleep. Unlike spring-blooming tulips, hyacinths, crocuses and most daffodils, these holiday favorites don't need to chill out before rooting and flowering. By simulating the conditions of their home climates - the warm Mediterranean Basin for paperwhites, tropical South America for amaryllis - you can persuade them to blossom right now, on your windowsill, without weeks of sleepover in the fridge.
NEWS
By Kathy Van Mullekom and Kathy Van Mullekom,DAILY PRESS | November 19, 2006
Now is time to pot up amaryllis bulbs so you have a succession of flowers beginning the next few weeks - just in time for your holiday decorating. To get a steady stream of flowers until spring, stagger the times you plant bulbs in decorative containers that will brighten your indoor decor. "It may be surprising to learn that amaryllis varieties don't all come to flower in the same time frame," says Sally Ferguson with the Netherlands Flower Bulb Information Center in Vermont. "Some varieties flower very quickly in around four to six weeks.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser | November 12, 2006
Many of this column's readers have watched an amaryllis emerge from its hard bulb to flower. To me they seem unworldly, perhaps a little dangerous, like a wild bird you don't want to get too close to. Here Connie Wanek of Duluth, Minn., takes a close and playful look at an amaryllis that looks right back at her. - Ted Kooser "Amaryllis" A flower needs to be this size to conceal the winter window, and this color, the red of a Fiat with the top down, to impress us, dull as we've grown.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and By Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | November 28, 2004
Gardeners never give up. The hardy mums outside may be toast, but we're not finished. We're setting up festive mini-gardens of holiday plants indoors. What is a holiday plant? It can be one named for the season -- Christmas heather (Erica canaliculata 'Christmas Bells'), Christmas cactus (Schlumbergera bridgesii), Amaryllis 'Christmas Star.' Or one whose hues echo the colors of the season like carmine-flowered Flaming Katie (Kalanchoe blossfeldiana). "It has an incredible bloom that goes all through the holidays," says Cindy King, horticulturist at Kingstown Farm, Home and Garden in Chestertown.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | November 29, 2008
And you thought gardening was for gentle souls. What about forcing bulbs to bloom when they're trying to sleep? In the case of paperwhites and amaryllis, don't fret. They don't sleep. Unlike spring-blooming tulips, hyacinths, crocuses and most daffodils, these holiday favorites don't need to chill out before rooting and flowering. By simulating the conditions of their home climates - the warm Mediterranean Basin for paperwhites, tropical South America for amaryllis - you can persuade them to blossom right now, on your windowsill, without weeks of sleepover in the fridge.
FEATURES
By PASCALE LEMAIRE | June 2, 1991
EVERY BRIDE WANTS TO LOOK PERFECT ON HER SPECIAL DAY. THESE DAYS BRIDES ARE ALSO LOOKING FOR DRESSES THAT EXPRESS THEIR INDIVIDUAL STYLE. SIMPLICITY AND SOPHISTICATION ARE KEY. SILHOUETTES MAY BE CLEANER; BUT ALL BRIDES STILL LOVE EXQUISITE FABRICS, BEAUTIFUL LACE AND ORNAMENTATION. FOR MORE CHOICES, TODAY'S BRIDES ARE EVEN TRYING THE VINTAGE AND CUSTOM MARKET.SIMPLE ELEGANCEembroidered lace embellishments add sparkle to a simple silhouette. Organza gown by Christos, $1,975 at Memories. Seed pearl arch tiara with sparkle netting, $295 at Romance Studio.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | January 18, 2004
Fragrance is like comfort food -- it lifts flagging spirits and feeds the soul. Yet this time of year, the outdoors smells like gunmetal. And some engine exhaust. It's like an olfactory gulag out there, and there's little we can do to improve it. But while we can't perfume the outdoors (too cold, too big), we can wonderfully enhance our interiors with fragrant windowsills. Better than chemicals (and more beautiful besides), flowers, forced bulbs and plants on a windowsill can transform a stuffy room and with it, the occupants.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | November 30, 2003
Victorian playwright Oscar Wilde once said he could resist anything but temptation. Around the holidays, many people feel that way about amaryllis. We want them all -- the giant Dutch hybrids with blooms as big as soup bowls, the elegant singles with softly shaded petals like something out of a Vermeer painting, the miniatures (a relative term when it comes to amaryllis), the delicate Cybisters, and the gaudy doubles that are wildly ruffled and splashed with color. Years ago, amaryllis were known for their one-note color schemes.
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