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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2000
The emergence of rookie Luis Matos proved more costly to Rich Amaral than an injured calf muscle. Amaral, who began the season as a backup outfielder, was released by the Orioles yesterday as part of their roster shuffling that included the return of infielder Ryan Minor and promotion of reliever Ryan Kohlmeier. Amaral hadn't played since June 14, when he collected two hits and drove in two runs while batting leadoff against Texas. He awoke the next day barely able to walk and went on the disabled list with a strained calf muscle.
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NEWS
July 28, 2003
On July 26, 2003, JOHN EDMUND, JR.; beloved husband of the late Margaret Elizabeth Lafferty (nee Frank); devoted father of Daniel A. Lafferty, of Towson, Lydia E. Lafferty, of Timonium, Margaret (Peggy) Lafferty Amaral, of Narragansett, RI and the late Richard J. Lafferty; dear brother of Edmund Lafferty, Rev. Charles Lafferty and William Lafferty; loving grandfather of Michael, Patrick, Timothy, Kathleen, Mark, Jennifer, Nina, Megan and Nicholas; great-grandfather of Ben Lafferty; god-father of Marge Jameson-Eschmann.
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SPORTS
December 22, 1998
Needing a more flexible bench and additional right-handed relief, the Orioles agreed to terms yesterday with utility player Rich Amaral on a two-year contract and pitcher Ricky Bones on a one-year deal.Amaral, who signed for $1 million, had spent his entire eight-year career with the Seattle Mariners. He appeared in only 73 games last season because of injuries, his fewest since 1992, and batted .276 with one homer, four RBIs and 11 steals in 12 attempts. Most attractive to the Orioles, he played first, second and third base, and all three outfield positions.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2003
PHOENIX - Everyone has a favorite Amare Stoudemire story these days. Phoenix Suns coach Frank Johnson has his. It happened when Stoudemire worked out for the Suns last year before the NBA draft. The Suns, picking ninth, had brought in a number of prospects and ran a drill to test their vertical leaps. Stoudemire jumped higher - much higher - than anyone else on the floor. Mouths opened in unison. "This might have been his first workout," Johnson recalled recently. "He goes up with two hands.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1999
VERO BEACH, Fla. -- Orioles manager Ray Miller had planned on bringing Rich Amaral here for yesterday's game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, circling his name on the travel list, but trainer Richie Bancells recommended the utility player remain in Fort Lauderdale for another day of treatments on his sore back.Amaral hasn't played since March 16 because of the condition, which flared up while taking ground balls.Amaral said he has had periodic trouble with his back during his career, usually associated with spring training.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2000
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Orioles outfielder Rich Amaral said he's approaching this spring training like any other, which means proving himself all over again. He doesn't know if he'll make the club as a backup. He doesn't expect any promises. They've rarely come to a player who turns 38 in April and has lasted parts of nine seasons in the majors, a player who has learned to accept a limited role without complaint. "I can't control that, so I'm not going to get frustrated," he said. "I just prepare myself so that whenever they ask me to play, I'm ready.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1999
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Rich Amaral took grounders at first base yesterday and later shagged some balls in the outfield. He easily could have moved around the diamond since he'll be covering so much ground this season as the Orioles' new utility player.Name a position, and chancesl are Amaral has been there.Amaral arrived at camp yesterday, the date when position players were scheduled to report. The first full-squad workout takes place today.He was joined in the afternoon by outfielder Darnell McDonald, chosen in the first round of the 1997 draft, and left fielder B. J. Surhoff soon followed, as space in the clubhouse became more scarce.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO and ROCH KUBATKO,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1999
VIERA, Fla. -- Jason Johnson said he believed he had a shot at making the Tampa Bay Devil Rays' rotation this season, or so he had been told. At the very least, he was a part of their future.Three days ago, Johnson was part of a trade that he never saw coming.Johnson was acquired by the Orioles on Monday for minor-league outfielder Danny Clyburn and a player to be named. The news, he said, came as an "absolute shock.""I wasn't expecting it at all," he said, standing in the visitors' dugout at Space Coast Stadium.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2000
The Orioles managed to get younger for their road trip, but not the way they had intended. They placed outfielder Rich Amaral on the 15-day disabled list yesterday and called up Luis Matos from Double-A Bowie. Amaral, 38, apparently strained his left calf during Wednesday's game against Texas. He went 2-for-4 with two RBIs and two runs scored, raising his batting average to .217. How the injury occurred remains a mystery to Amaral, who's eligible to return June 30. "I don't remember doing it," he said.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2000
Not only does Orioles outfielder Rich Amaral remain on the disabled list, four days beyond the date he was eligible to come off, but he also might not play again until after the All-Star break. Manager Mike Hargrove left open that possibility yesterday after giving rookie Luis Matos his first start in right field, with Albert Belle serving as the designated hitter against Toronto Blue Jays left-hander David Wells. The strained left-calf muscle has improved enough to allow Amaral to run in the outfield before games, but the Orioles are taking a cautious approach while also using the time to get an extended look at Matos, 21, who has developed into one of the farm system's better prospects and represents the shift to youth and speed that the organization is seeking.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 9, 2003
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil - A senior official in the left-wing government that took power last week has set off a furor here and alarmed neighboring countries by arguing that Brazil, Latin America's largest nation, should acquire the capacity to produce a nuclear weapon. "Brazil is a country at peace, that has always preserved peace and is a defender of peace, but we need to be prepared, including technologically," Roberto Amaral, newly appointed minister of science and technology, said in an interview with the Brazilian service of the BBC broadcast Sunday night.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2002
The youngest of four people accused of kidnapping and murdering a Glen Burnie pharmacist in August will be tried as an adult, Baltimore Circuit Judge Allen L. Schwait ruled yesterday. Brian Wilson, 16, of the 2600 block of Garrett Ave. will not be tried in juvenile court as his attorney, Gil Amaral, had hoped. Wilson was 15 at the time of the killing. He and three co-defendants, Jamal D. Barnes, 24, of the 4300 block of Seminole Ave.; Brian McMillan, 18, of the 2500 block of Garrett Ave.; and Larry Walker, 16, of the 2200 block of Homewood Ave. are scheduled for trial on March 6. Assistant State's Attorney Sharon R. Holback argued against Wilson being tried as a juvenile.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2000
The emergence of rookie Luis Matos proved more costly to Rich Amaral than an injured calf muscle. Amaral, who began the season as a backup outfielder, was released by the Orioles yesterday as part of their roster shuffling that included the return of infielder Ryan Minor and promotion of reliever Ryan Kohlmeier. Amaral hadn't played since June 14, when he collected two hits and drove in two runs while batting leadoff against Texas. He awoke the next day barely able to walk and went on the disabled list with a strained calf muscle.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2000
Not only does Orioles outfielder Rich Amaral remain on the disabled list, four days beyond the date he was eligible to come off, but he also might not play again until after the All-Star break. Manager Mike Hargrove left open that possibility yesterday after giving rookie Luis Matos his first start in right field, with Albert Belle serving as the designated hitter against Toronto Blue Jays left-hander David Wells. The strained left-calf muscle has improved enough to allow Amaral to run in the outfield before games, but the Orioles are taking a cautious approach while also using the time to get an extended look at Matos, 21, who has developed into one of the farm system's better prospects and represents the shift to youth and speed that the organization is seeking.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2000
Though eligible to come off the disabled list yesterday, Orioles outfielder Rich Amaral apparently will remain off the 25-man roster for a few more days while continuing to test his injured left calf with some pre-game running. Amaral, who strained a muscle in his lower leg during a June 14 game against Texas, ran yesterday for the fourth straight day. He picked up the pace a little more and said he was satisfied with his progress but also understands why the club is being cautious. "It's going great.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2000
BOSTON - As trade rumors continue to swirl around his ballclub, Orioles manager Mike Hargrove is trying to keep the season from spiraling out of control. The trick is preventing certain players from becoming too distracted and maintaining everyone's focus on reversing an 8-16 June that included last night's 6-3 victory over the Boston Red Sox. Tied for last place, if the Orioles are going to make a run to daylight, they've all got to be going in the same direction. "I'm sure they find it distracting, but I think everybody's professional enough to know it's part of the business," Hargrove said before last night's game.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1999
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- As a utility player, Rich Amaral makes his living being able to contribute at a moment's notice, shaking off the rust with each stride from the dugout. Steady playing time never comes, but it can't be used as an excuse for any period of struggles.In that sense, Amaral's spring has been good preparation for the season.Before starting in left field yesterday, he hadn't played since March 16 because of a strained lower back. Amaral had been hitting soft tosses in the cage the past few days, and took regular batting practice yesterday.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1999
Before taking the field for yesterday's game against the Minnesota Twins, Orioles first baseman Jeff Conine had a brief chat with hitting coach Terry Crowley. Buried beneath a 1-for-19 slump, he was open to any suggestions.Even the simple ones."He told me to go up there and let it go. If I get a pitch in the strike zone, let it go. Don't wait for that perfect pitch down the middle. It might not come," Conine said."You've got to hit a strike. Not a perfect strike, just a strike."Conine and Rich Amaral saw a few of them yesterday and didn't miss.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2000
The Orioles managed to get younger for their road trip, but not the way they had intended. They placed outfielder Rich Amaral on the 15-day disabled list yesterday and called up Luis Matos from Double-A Bowie. Amaral, 38, apparently strained his left calf during Wednesday's game against Texas. He went 2-for-4 with two RBIs and two runs scored, raising his batting average to .217. How the injury occurred remains a mystery to Amaral, who's eligible to return June 30. "I don't remember doing it," he said.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2000
CHICAGO -- The Orioles identified their hard-luck case the night before as Mike Mussina, the guy with the golden arm, the gilded career win percentage but the absentee offense. Last night against the Chicago White Sox, they anointed their talisman, a plain-talking, unassuming guy with a Bubba Gump accent, a mishmash assortment and the underrated ability to make an offense break out. The Orioles left Comiskey Park last night celebrating Pat Rapp, the well-traveled son of Sulphur, La., and a 12-6 win. As if moved by Rapp's presence, the Orioles evicted White Sox starting pitcher Mike Sirotka within 2 1/3 innings, leaving the left-hander with more runs than outs.
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