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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
The marvel of Mozart is not just the effortless stream of perfectly constructed, sublimely beautiful music that poured from him. There's also something terribly fascinating about the crass humor that he dished out with equal flair. Peter Shaffer uses that juxtaposition of the pure and the puerile as a major element in his hit play "Amadeus," a 1979 work now enjoying an earnest revival at Fells Point Corner Theatre. The playwright only had to delve into Mozart's letters, along with a few of his less familiar compositions, to find a gold mine of scatological drollery.
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By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
In a letter to his father, a 25-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart declared: "I pay no attention whatever to anybody's praise or blame. … I simply follow my own feelings. " This self-confidence is just one of the revered composer's traits explored in Peter Shaffer's play "Amadeus," which Center Stage is reviving for its season-opener. A few other Mozart characteristics, including behavior still not considered kosher in polite society, also pepper this colorful mix of fact and fiction.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Center Stage will offer a mix of new, nostalgic and musical for the 2014-2015 season. The new includes a double-header next spring of works by celebrated young American playwright Amy Herzog. "After the Revolution" and "4000 Miles" which set off glowing notices when they received Off-Broadway productions in 2010 and 2011, respectively, will be performed in repertory with shared casts. "I just think Baltimore deserves to know who the most exciting playwrights are now in this country," Kwei-Armah said, "and Amy's one of the bright stars in the firmament.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
The marvel of Mozart is not just the effortless stream of perfectly constructed, sublimely beautiful music that poured from him. There's also something terribly fascinating about the crass humor that he dished out with equal flair. Peter Shaffer uses that juxtaposition of the pure and the puerile as a major element in his hit play "Amadeus," a 1979 work now enjoying an earnest revival at Fells Point Corner Theatre. The playwright only had to delve into Mozart's letters, along with a few of his less familiar compositions, to find a gold mine of scatological drollery.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 26, 2002
SUN SCORE ** 1/2 (two and one-half stars) With the addition of 20 extra minutes in its new "director's cut," Amadeus still ought to be called Salieri. It's not just that the dramatic balance slants toward the mediocre yet prosperous and acclaimed composer Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) rather than the idiot savant-like genius Mozart (Tom Hulce). And it's not just that Abraham is tremendous in his role while Hulce is flatly buffoonish in his. It's that the moviemaking itself has a Salieri-like pedantry and obviousness.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS and TOM PETERS,1992 TPG COMMUNICATIONS | July 20, 1992
There's a moment in the movie "Amadeus" that always makes the hairs on the back of my neck bristle. Young Mozart plays the piano before Emperor Joseph II. Salieri, the reigning musician of the day, is in the background. Mozart sits and begins a Salieri score. Then he starts to improvise, and a voluptuous burst of trills and arpeggios fills the air.I thought about "Amadeus" after re-reading a Newsweek story (March 1992) which quoted Robert D. Knoll of Consumer Reports: "The Americans are building nice average cars but few 'gee-whiz-look-at-this' cars."
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2003
Outdoor theater often includes annoyances like bugs attacking the actors as they sweat in the summer heat and children running around on the grass during a play. But members of the Olney Theatre Center's annual Summer Shakespeare group still say performing without walls makes for great theater. "Because it is on a larger scale outdoors, it is really exciting to see what happens," said Benjamin Sands, 21, an actor from Cincinnati who is with the Olney group this summer. Audiences can see the company's production of Amadeus - a departure from its usual focus on Shakespeare - amid the rolling hills and 200-year-old trees of the Glenelg Country School in western Howard County at 8 p.m. today through Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 27, 1995
Beethoven's Fifth, according to Bernard Rose's "Immortal Beloved": Da-da-da-DUMB!This convoluted, lush and glitzy film attempts to do for Herr Beethoven what Peter Shaffer and Milos Forman did for Herr Mozart 10 years back in "Amadeus." But it's somehow unlikely that "Immortal Beloved" will break the 42-week record that "Amadeus" set at the Senator, where it's playing exclusively, even with a new Sony SDDS digital sound system.In fact, only as a sound- system platform is the movie worth the effort it takes to get there: The music, thrown in somewhat willy-nilly, hither and yon and catch as catch can, is still Beethoven, still mind-boggling in its power and its glory.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 13, 1996
Has it been noted anywhere that three S. Gottliebs are practicing medicine in Baltimore -- Stephen Gottlieb, Sheldon Gottlieb and Sidney Gottlieb -- and they're all cardiologists, albeit with separate practices and slightly different specialties? (This is all original material, folks, not a word comes from Henny Youngman.)Stephen focuses on heart failure, Sheldon on gerontology, Sidney on coronary artery disease. Stephen is affiliated with University of Maryland Hospital, Sheldon with The Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center; Sidney has a private practice.
NEWS
By Tim Swift | May 24, 2009
ART My Food, My Poop: Admit it, you're grossed out but curious. Hugh Pocock's show at the Contemporary Museum mixes art and advocacy, examining how much we literally consume. And don't be squeamish; wood blocks act as stand-ins for the ... you know. Web: www.contemporary.org POP MUSIC 'Wolfgang Amadeus : Phoenix: ' by Phoenix : Much like its mystical namesake, this French band opens its latest album with a brilliant flash and then settles into dour ash. That said, the euro dance party - fueled by slick songs like "1901" - is fun while it lasts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Center Stage will offer a mix of new, nostalgic and musical for the 2014-2015 season. The new includes a double-header next spring of works by celebrated young American playwright Amy Herzog. "After the Revolution" and "4000 Miles" which set off glowing notices when they received Off-Broadway productions in 2010 and 2011, respectively, will be performed in repertory with shared casts. "I just think Baltimore deserves to know who the most exciting playwrights are now in this country," Kwei-Armah said, "and Amy's one of the bright stars in the firmament.
NEWS
By Tim Swift | May 24, 2009
ART My Food, My Poop: Admit it, you're grossed out but curious. Hugh Pocock's show at the Contemporary Museum mixes art and advocacy, examining how much we literally consume. And don't be squeamish; wood blocks act as stand-ins for the ... you know. Web: www.contemporary.org POP MUSIC 'Wolfgang Amadeus : Phoenix: ' by Phoenix : Much like its mystical namesake, this French band opens its latest album with a brilliant flash and then settles into dour ash. That said, the euro dance party - fueled by slick songs like "1901" - is fun while it lasts.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2003
Outdoor theater often includes annoyances like bugs attacking the actors as they sweat in the summer heat and children running around on the grass during a play. But members of the Olney Theatre Center's annual Summer Shakespeare group still say performing without walls makes for great theater. "Because it is on a larger scale outdoors, it is really exciting to see what happens," said Benjamin Sands, 21, an actor from Cincinnati who is with the Olney group this summer. Audiences can see the company's production of Amadeus - a departure from its usual focus on Shakespeare - amid the rolling hills and 200-year-old trees of the Glenelg Country School in western Howard County at 8 p.m. today through Sunday.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 26, 2002
SUN SCORE ** 1/2 (two and one-half stars) With the addition of 20 extra minutes in its new "director's cut," Amadeus still ought to be called Salieri. It's not just that the dramatic balance slants toward the mediocre yet prosperous and acclaimed composer Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) rather than the idiot savant-like genius Mozart (Tom Hulce). And it's not just that Abraham is tremendous in his role while Hulce is flatly buffoonish in his. It's that the moviemaking itself has a Salieri-like pedantry and obviousness.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 22, 1998
Although Peter Shaffer titled his splendid 1979 play "Amadeus," the protagonist isn't Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, but the man who considered Mozart his arch-rival -- Austrian court composer Antonio Salieri.In Shaffer's interpretation, however, the rage and revenge Salieri feels aren't primarily directed against Mozart, though the young tTC upstart feels the brunt of it. Most of all, Salieri is raging against God -- the "God of Bargains," as he puts it.But that overweening anger isn't readily apparent in Mitchell Hebert's portrayal of Salieri at Olney Theatre Center.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 13, 1996
Has it been noted anywhere that three S. Gottliebs are practicing medicine in Baltimore -- Stephen Gottlieb, Sheldon Gottlieb and Sidney Gottlieb -- and they're all cardiologists, albeit with separate practices and slightly different specialties? (This is all original material, folks, not a word comes from Henny Youngman.)Stephen focuses on heart failure, Sheldon on gerontology, Sidney on coronary artery disease. Stephen is affiliated with University of Maryland Hospital, Sheldon with The Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center; Sidney has a private practice.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 22, 1998
Although Peter Shaffer titled his splendid 1979 play "Amadeus," the protagonist isn't Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, but the man who considered Mozart his arch-rival -- Austrian court composer Antonio Salieri.In Shaffer's interpretation, however, the rage and revenge Salieri feels aren't primarily directed against Mozart, though the young tTC upstart feels the brunt of it. Most of all, Salieri is raging against God -- the "God of Bargains," as he puts it.But that overweening anger isn't readily apparent in Mitchell Hebert's portrayal of Salieri at Olney Theatre Center.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 20, 1996
Everyman Theatre has mounted the most elaborate, elegant production in its short history -- in support of a play about mediocrity.The play is Peter Shaffer's "Amadeus," and the staging is perfectly appropriate since Shaffer tells his story through contrasts.The central contrast concerns Antonio Salieri. At one time the most celebrated composer in Europe, Salieri has the inescapable truth of his own mediocrity forced upon him when confronted by the bona fide genius of that obnoxious prodigy, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 20, 1996
Everyman Theatre has mounted the most elaborate, elegant production in its short history -- in support of a play about mediocrity.The play is Peter Shaffer's "Amadeus," and the staging is perfectly appropriate since Shaffer tells his story through contrasts.The central contrast concerns Antonio Salieri. At one time the most celebrated composer in Europe, Salieri has the inescapable truth of his own mediocrity forced upon him when confronted by the bona fide genius of that obnoxious prodigy, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 27, 1995
Beethoven's Fifth, according to Bernard Rose's "Immortal Beloved": Da-da-da-DUMB!This convoluted, lush and glitzy film attempts to do for Herr Beethoven what Peter Shaffer and Milos Forman did for Herr Mozart 10 years back in "Amadeus." But it's somehow unlikely that "Immortal Beloved" will break the 42-week record that "Amadeus" set at the Senator, where it's playing exclusively, even with a new Sony SDDS digital sound system.In fact, only as a sound- system platform is the movie worth the effort it takes to get there: The music, thrown in somewhat willy-nilly, hither and yon and catch as catch can, is still Beethoven, still mind-boggling in its power and its glory.
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