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By Los Angeles Times | April 28, 1993
PASADENA, Calif. -- Researchers say they have identified previously unsuspected chemical imbalance in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease and have developed a sophisticated test that permits quick diagnosis of the disorder.Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's, which affects as many as 4 million Americans, is becoming increasingly important as researchers develop new drugs that they hope can impede the progress of the disease. Most researchers feel that these drugs will be most valuable when used in the early stages of Alzheimer's, but early detection is now extremely difficult.
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NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | January 10, 2010
Gary Gardner was leaving a community meeting in the Wilde Lake Village Center one night last summer when an elderly woman who lived nearby approached him. The woman was frantic, Gardner recalled. "Have you seen my husband?" she asked, showing a picture to Gardner, the deputy chief of the Howard County Police Department. The woman told Gardner that her husband, a former triathlete who was still in great physical shape, had wandered off from their nearby home. She was worried because he suffered from Alzheimer's and often left without notice.
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NEWS
By Paul S. Fishman | June 16, 2004
I HAVE SEEN dramatic improvements in understanding the basic biology of Alzheimer's disease in the past 25 years and am encouraged that public awareness, medical knowledge, support and care for Alzheimer's patients have never been better. But I remain frustrated with the limits of current treatments to improve the outcome for patients dealing with a cruel and malignant condition that progressively robs them of the ability to remember, reason, speak, understand and function independently.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | November 8, 2007
Alzheimer's disease, which causes memory loss and changes in thinking and behavior, affects more than 5 million Americans (and more than 24 million people worldwide), according to Alzheimer's Disease International. The disease also has a profound impact on the lives of those who live with and care for Alzheimer's patients. Although the disease is not yet curable, there are many treatments, including medications and support, that can aid patient and caregiver, says ConstantineLyketsos, chairman of the psychiatry department at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center.
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | July 16, 1993
The initial forgetfulness and eventual bizarre behavior that typify Alzheimer's disease may be caused by brain cells that commit suicide by a built-in killer molecule.That discovery by scientists in California may help clarify work under way that seeks to explain why the brain cells -- or neurons -- die in Alzheimer's patients."What we found is the first example of a hit man in your neurons," said Dr. Dale Bredesen, a neurobiologist at the University of California at Los Angeles."This is an unusual phenomenon, and we're excited about it because it explains a lot of things that we didn't understand before," he said.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | November 18, 1992
The Carroll Planning Commission approved site plans yesterday for Copper Ridge, a health care facility in Sykesville that will specialize in the treatment of Alzheimer's patients.The commission's approval of site development plans for the 126-bed facility came with several routine conditions, including requirements that owner and operator Episcopal Health Ministries Inc. make road improvements and secure utility hookups.During a brief presentation, EHM Vice President Carol L. Kershner told the commission the "project is more than just a nursing home."
NEWS
By Jane E. Allen and By Jane E. Allen,Special to the Sun | January 12, 2003
Alzheimer's research has yet to yield many useful therapies, even as the demand for treatments grows -- U.S. cases are expected to increase from 4 million to as many as 16 million by the middle of this century. A promising vaccine produced brain inflammation; medications that help patients function better during the early and moderate stages eventually lose ground to the incurable disease; and newer compounds to treat and prevent it remain years from reaching pharmacies. So it's not surprising that scores of people with Alz-heimer's are signing up to have shunts implanted in their brains, an invasive approach that has become one of the few bright spots in Alzheimer's research.
NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | February 10, 1993
When 90-year-old Estelle Wayson arrived at the Crofton Convalescent Center several years ago, suffering from Alzheimer's disease, she was listless and not very alert.Now, her daughter says she's more alive and vivacious than ever before -- and Diane Kouns is part of the reason why.Ms. Kouns, a program leader for Midday Activity Therapy (MAT) at Crofton, works with Mrs. Wayson and 13 other sufferers of Alzheimer's and dementia as part of a "classroom-setting" program specifically designed to meet each patient's individual needs.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | September 8, 2005
How many animals can you name in a minute? How about fruits? British scientists say people on the road to Alzheimer's disease have shorter lists, containing more commonly used words, such as "cat" and "apple." Those with healthy memories use fewer everyday words and more uncommon words such as "badger" and "kiwi." Andy Ellis and colleagues at the University of Leeds in England say commonly used words are learned between a child's first and fifth year of life. Less commonly used words, such as zebra and giraffe, are learned a few years later during elementary school.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | January 10, 2010
Gary Gardner was leaving a community meeting in the Wilde Lake Village Center one night last summer when an elderly woman who lived nearby approached him. The woman was frantic, Gardner recalled. "Have you seen my husband?" she asked, showing a picture to Gardner, the deputy chief of the Howard County Police Department. The woman told Gardner that her husband, a former triathlete who was still in great physical shape, had wandered off from their nearby home. She was worried because he suffered from Alzheimer's and often left without notice.
NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Denise Gellene,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 2006
Drugs widely prescribed to control agitation, aggression, hallucinations or delusions in Alzheimer's patients provided few, if any, benefits and carried severe side effects, according to a large study released yesterday. The findings of the federally funded clinical trial challenged conventional wisdom about the medications and painted a grim picture of the state of treatment of Alzheimer's disease. "We need a new generation of drugs for these very serious behaviors," said Dr. Thomas R. Insel, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, which paid for the study.
NEWS
By SHARI ROAN and SHARI ROAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 30, 2006
Reports of success in treating Alzheimer's disease using injections of the arthritis drug Enbrel have sparked hope among Alzheimer's patients and their families - and some concern among physicians. A recent study reported improvement in cognitive symptoms among 15 Alzheimer's patients who received weekly injections of Enbrel for six months. But doctors not involved in the research say the publicity surrounding it could lead Alzheimer's patients or their family members to believe Enbrel is a proven treatment for the disease when the study actually reflects interesting, but preliminary, research.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | September 8, 2005
How many animals can you name in a minute? How about fruits? British scientists say people on the road to Alzheimer's disease have shorter lists, containing more commonly used words, such as "cat" and "apple." Those with healthy memories use fewer everyday words and more uncommon words such as "badger" and "kiwi." Andy Ellis and colleagues at the University of Leeds in England say commonly used words are learned between a child's first and fifth year of life. Less commonly used words, such as zebra and giraffe, are learned a few years later during elementary school.
NEWS
By Paul S. Fishman | June 16, 2004
I HAVE SEEN dramatic improvements in understanding the basic biology of Alzheimer's disease in the past 25 years and am encouraged that public awareness, medical knowledge, support and care for Alzheimer's patients have never been better. But I remain frustrated with the limits of current treatments to improve the outcome for patients dealing with a cruel and malignant condition that progressively robs them of the ability to remember, reason, speak, understand and function independently.
NEWS
By Jane E. Allen and By Jane E. Allen,Special to the Sun | January 12, 2003
Alzheimer's research has yet to yield many useful therapies, even as the demand for treatments grows -- U.S. cases are expected to increase from 4 million to as many as 16 million by the middle of this century. A promising vaccine produced brain inflammation; medications that help patients function better during the early and moderate stages eventually lose ground to the incurable disease; and newer compounds to treat and prevent it remain years from reaching pharmacies. So it's not surprising that scores of people with Alz-heimer's are signing up to have shunts implanted in their brains, an invasive approach that has become one of the few bright spots in Alzheimer's research.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 9, 2001
Maureen Reagan, who as the daughter of former President Ronald Reagan raised national awareness of Alzheimer's disease, died yesterday of malignant melanoma. She was 60. The popular political activist, commentator and author died peacefully in her Granite Bay, Calif., home near Sacramento, said her husband, Dennis C. Revell. Ms. Reagan's battle with the deadly skin cancer, diagnosed in 1996, was private at first. But she broke her silence in 1998 after a yearlong course of treatment that pushed the disease into remission.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 16, 1991
In a leap forward in the search for a cause of Alzheimer's tTC disease, researchers have discovered that a pinpoint mutation in a single gene can cause this progressive neurological illness.The discovery, by Dr. John Hardy of St. Mary's Hospital in London and his colleagues, is the first gene for Alzheimer's disease that has been found.Although there are likely to be others that can cause the disease, the discovery of this one will allow investigators to narrow their search for causes and treatments for the disease.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration announced yesterday that it will make a controversial, experimental Alzheimer's disease drug widely accessible to patients while it is still under study.Tacrine, or THA, will be the first drug made available to treat the progressive degenerative disease, which is the fourth-leading cause of death among adults in the United States.The drug is not a cure for the ultimately fatal disease, which causes gradual mental deterioration, including loss of memory.
NEWS
By Deborah Stoudt and Deborah Stoudt,Special to the Sun | May 2, 1999
Ellen Young believes in finding the positive even in the worst of times. That's why the retired Lutherville social worker wrote "Between Two Worlds -- Special Moments of Alzheimer's and Dementia" (Prometheus Books, $24.95). The book, which will appear in stores next month, encourages Alzheimer's caregivers to laugh and find joy amid the hardships of dealing with the disease.From her own experiences with her aunt, who died of complications from Alzheimer's at 85, and those of her mother, Mary Alice Parks, 88, an Alzheimer's patient at Keswick Multicare Center in Baltimore, Young wanted to share her survival strategy with other families to "lighten their load."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 11, 1997
It's hard to imagine a more heartbreaking disease than Alzheimer's or a more heartbreaking hour than "Lost in the Mind" (11 p.m.-midnight, MPT, Channels 22 and 67).The work of Washington-based producer Don Lennox (who lost his mother to the disease in 1994), the show includes multiple visits with Alzheimer's patients, generally made two years apart. The effects of the disease's progress is both dramatic and demoralizing, as patients lose their memory, their ability to put sentences together, even their ability to walk.
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