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Alzheimer S Disease

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By Los Angeles Times | April 28, 1993
PASADENA, Calif. -- Researchers say they have identified previously unsuspected chemical imbalance in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease and have developed a sophisticated test that permits quick diagnosis of the disorder.Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's, which affects as many as 4 million Americans, is becoming increasingly important as researchers develop new drugs that they hope can impede the progress of the disease. Most researchers feel that these drugs will be most valuable when used in the early stages of Alzheimer's, but early detection is now extremely difficult.
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NEWS
October 12, 2009
Dementia is an illness characterized by significant impairment of one or more areas of higher cognitive functioning, such as memory or ability to calculate. Dr. Mel Daly, a geriatrician at Greater Baltimore Medical Center Greater Geriatrics Group, discusses symptoms and treatment for dementia. * About one in five people over age 80 have some form of dementia. Close relatives of people with early onset (before age 60) Alzheimer's disease have a greater chance of getting the disease. Those with genes from a group called ApoE are at increased risk for developing Alzheimer's disease.
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | February 16, 1995
Antoinette Tilsch Otwell, who had been a commercial artist and painter, died Monday of Alzheimer's disease at Bay Meadow Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Glen Burnie. She was 83.Known as "Aunn" or "Toni," she worked for many years in the advertising department of Stewart & Co., drawing, designing, laying out and writing ad copy.She did free-lance work for advertising agencies and other stores, including Hecht-May Co., Linda Lynn and Mano Swartz Furs until she retired in 1975.After retiring, she moved to Millsboro and later to Selbyville, both in Delaware.
NEWS
April 12, 2009
On Friday, April 10, 2009, MARY JANE (nee Davis) CARDUFF, devoted wife of William F. Carduff, died peacefully of complications due to Alzheimer's disease. She was also survived by daughters Sharon M. Caruso and her husband Dave; grandchildren Geoffrey, Courtney, Susan M. Cessna and her husband Brian; grandsons Branden and Matthew, Kathleen M. Cessna, and granddaughters Jennifer, Kimberly and Lindsay. Due to the fact that her body was donated to the Anatomy Board, there will be a memorial mass on Monday, April 13th, 11 A.M. at St. John's Neumann Church in Berlin, MD. In lieu of flowers contributions can be made on her behalf to the Alzheimer's Association.
NEWS
November 16, 1997
Ann Bishop, 66, a retired Miami television news anchor whose reporting career spanned four decades, died of cancer Friday. She was a reporter at WJZ-TV in Baltimore from 1965 to 1970, and over the next 25 years became the most recognized and trusted television news figure in South Florida as a reporter and co-anchor of the evening newscasts at WPLG-TV.Sara Remington, 13, the longest-surviving pediatric heart transplant recipient, died Tuesday of coronary disease in Houston. She received the heart of a 3-year-old accident victim on Nov. 1, 1984, at Texas Heart Institute.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | August 15, 1991
Researchers have demonstrated in rats that injections of a naturally occurring brain hormone can block a type of cell degeneration seen in Alzheimer's disease, thereby opening the door to potential treatment of the degenerative neurological disorder, which is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States.The Boston scientists have shown for the first time in live animals that accumulation of a common brain protein called beta-amyloid causes the nerve damage characteristic of Alzheimer's, for which there is now no good therapy, and that it is possible to prevent such damage.
NEWS
December 10, 2002
N. Arundel Hospital names Physician of the Year North Arundel Hospital has announced that vascular surgeon Dr. U. Rao Sunkara has been named Physician of the Year. The award was established this year to recognize a member of the hospital's medical staff who has made significant contributions to the success of the institution and who best exemplifies its goal to provide excellent patient care. The hospital also announced that Dr. Bradford Carter has been named director of surgical oncology at Tate Cancer Center.
NEWS
By Paul S. Fishman | June 16, 2004
I HAVE SEEN dramatic improvements in understanding the basic biology of Alzheimer's disease in the past 25 years and am encouraged that public awareness, medical knowledge, support and care for Alzheimer's patients have never been better. But I remain frustrated with the limits of current treatments to improve the outcome for patients dealing with a cruel and malignant condition that progressively robs them of the ability to remember, reason, speak, understand and function independently.
NEWS
October 15, 2006
Raymond J. Noorda, a co-founder of Novell Inc., a software company that helped pioneer computer networking, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Monday at his home in Orem, Utah. He was 82. He was the chief executive of Novell from 1983 to 1995, a period of explosive growth in the use of computers in businesses and homes. During that time, a software program developed by Novell called NetWare was used extensively by businesses and other organizations to link together, or network, individual desktop computers so they could share printers and files.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN | September 9, 2007
FACE/OFF Special Collector's Edition DVD AWAY FROM HER Lionsgate -- $27.98 It is rare to see the luminous Julie Christie on the screen. She has never been enamored with the movie business and turns down far more roles than she accepts. But young director Sarah Polley was persistent, and Christie gave in. In this deeply moving tale, she plays a woman married for 50 years to a man (Gordon Pinsent), upon whom it dawns that his wife is slowly losing her mind to Alzheimer's disease. Co-starring Michael Murphy and Olympia Dukakis.
NEWS
By From Sun staff and news services | November 19, 2008
NAACP chairman Bond won't seek new term BALTIMORE: Veteran civil rights activist Julian Bond will not seek another term as chairman of the NAACP's national board, saying the time is right to "let a new generation of leaders" take over the century-old organization. Bond, 68, has served as chairman since 1998. He announced yesterday that his current one-year chairman's term, which expires in February, will be his last, although he plans to remain on the board. "This is a time for renewal.
NEWS
By Ernestine Jones Jolivet and Ernestine Jones Jolivet,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2008
My parents, Virginia Ida and Pythias Alexander Jones, were wonderful people who died from Alzheimer's disease within 13 years of each other. My mother was diagnosed in 1974 when she was in her 50s. She was the type of person who remembered every birthday or anniversary, but one year she forgot my birthday. That was when I began to notice a change in her. I would talk to my mother every day, sometimes two and three times a day. We would talk about everything - from children and daily happenings to TV soap operas.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | August 17, 2008
Glenn Ira Kirkland, a physicist who became an advocate for those suffering from Alzheimer's disease and their families, and who later founded the Alzheimer's Disease Association of Maryland, died of heart and kidney failure Monday at Riderwood Village Retirement Community in Silver Spring. He was 89. Born and raised in Pittsburgh, Mr. Kirkland was a 1937 graduate of Taylor Allderdice High School and earned his bachelor's and master's degrees in physics from what is now Carnegie Mellon University.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | July 27, 2008
Imre Kovacsi kept a nail through a deadbolt on a side door to his Glen Burnie home and a chain with a lock around the front door. He often padlocked a fence around the backyard. But the first line of defense was the lock on the door to his wife's room, which was reversed so she couldn't get out on her own. He was desperate to keep Kathy Kovacsi, only 57 but suffering from advanced stages of Alzheimer's disease, from wandering out of the home. But on July 16, she somehow managed to slip out. Sometime between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., she apparently left through a side door with a loose latch and walked to a nearby fire station.
NEWS
February 11, 2008
Budget shortchanges medical research The president's 2008 budget proposal continues a dangerous trend of underfunding medical and scientific research ("President's budget comes under fire," Feb. 3). It underestimates the vital hope such research offers families facing debilitating and fatal diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. It is absolutely critical to maintain a level of funding that ensures that scientists have the tools and resources to find treatments to delay, halt or reverse the progression of Alzheimer's and other life-threatening diseases.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | January 13, 2008
Mary Matton was so touched by the traveling exhibit of 52 art quilts interpreting Alzheimer's disease that she decided she wanted to help. Besides, the project involved two of her favorite things, charity and quilting, she said. "I am always looking for a good cause to which I can donate quilts," said Matton, 61, of Davidsonville. "And I find Alzheimer's to be a very scary disease. It's scarier than cancer. You're here, but not mentally." Matton and about 20 other members of the Annapolis Quilting Guild are participating in the Alzheimer's Art Quilt Initiative, a grass-roots effort begun in January 2006 to increase awareness and fund research to help find a cure for Alzheimer's.
NEWS
July 31, 1998
Chancellor Gardens of Ellicott City, a $12 million assisted-living community, is scheduled to open this winter on Dorsey Hall Drive.The 84,000-square-foot facility, which is being developed by CareMatrix Corp. of Needham, Mass., will feature 110 apartments ranging in size from studio to two bedrooms.The majority of units will provide living assistance, including help with bathing, dressing, medication and dining and housekeeping. The remaining 16 units will be part of a care area for residents with Alzheimer's disease and other memory disorders.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2004
PHILADELPHIA - Advances in imaging technology such as PET scans and MRI could someday help detect Alzheimer's disease years before obvious symptoms emerge, enabling doctors to begin therapy early and determine whether patients are benefiting, scientists told a conference on the brain-wasting disease yesterday. Until recently, the only sure way to detect the telltale plaques and tangles of Alzheimer's disease was to analyze the brain after the patient had died. Although doctors can diagnose the disease by testing a patient's memory and listening to caregivers' accounts, the diagnosis is usually made years after the brain has begun to deteriorate.
NEWS
January 6, 2008
On Friday December 28, 2007, DAVID A. SCHULTZ, age 70, died after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease. David served in the Maryland National Guard and retired from MTA after 28 years of service. He is survived by his wife Delores Schultz and children, Vicky Quesinberry and Kathleen Schultz, step-children, Michelle Bowman and Frank Reinhardt, 6 grandchildren, and brother, Edward Schultz Jr. He is predeceased by his sister Elizabeth Krug. A Memorial service will be held in his honor on Saturday January 12, 2008, 4P.M.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | November 8, 2007
Alzheimer's disease, which causes memory loss and changes in thinking and behavior, affects more than 5 million Americans (and more than 24 million people worldwide), according to Alzheimer's Disease International. The disease also has a profound impact on the lives of those who live with and care for Alzheimer's patients. Although the disease is not yet curable, there are many treatments, including medications and support, that can aid patient and caregiver, says ConstantineLyketsos, chairman of the psychiatry department at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center.
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