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NEWS
April 22, 2014
I am responding to the letter from Dr. Andy Lazris entitled "Screening for Alzheimer's carries its own risks," (April 17). The Alzheimer's Association supports efforts that increase early detection and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease by trained professionals in a medical setting after a comprehensive evaluation. Today more than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's disease. With an aging baby boomer population, that number is expected to soar to as many as 16 million by mid-century.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
John Bruce Innes Jr., a former marketing executive for Genesis Health Ventures who was later a senior housing consultant, died July 22 of brain injuries suffered in a fall while he was vacationing in Greece. The Lutherville resident was 70. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Springfield, Pa., he was the son of John B. Innes Sr., a chemist, and Marion Rohrer Innes, a teacher. A 1962 graduate of Springfield High School, where he was on the school's newspaper editing staff, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at George Washington University, where he belonged to the Kappa Sigma Fraternity and was Inter-Fraternity Council president.
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HEALTH
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
Deb Donofrio had hoped to waltz with her husband at the Alzheimer's Association Memory Ball on Saturday. They would be one of the eight couples dancing to raise money to battle the disease that robs its victims of their memories. She and Chuck, the man who has shared her life for more than 25 years, had always loved to dance. As the benefit approached, they tried the fox trot and practiced other familiar steps. But the task overwhelmed Chuck, who was diagnosed six years ago, at age 50, with early-onset Alzheimer's.
NEWS
By Janet Simon Schreck | August 21, 2014
While the roles of depression and addiction in Robin William's suicide were the focus of most news stories about his death, perhaps the headlines should have focused on his recent diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, highlighting the intricate relationships between neurological diseases and mental health conditions. The U.S. health care system is woefully inadequate at addressing the overlap between the body, mind and soul in these patients. The anatomical, physiological and neurochemical changes in the brain associated with neurological disorders - such as stroke, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease - can exacerbate or worsen previously existing mental health conditions including depression and anxiety.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 28, 1999
Roadsters and rhythm were highlights of the recent Alzheimer's Association's "Cruisin' Down Memory Lane" gala.The 175 guests first got an eyeful of classic cars parked outside Ravens Stadium, then an earful of vintage tunes inside the North Club Level Lounge.It didn't take long for the Mood Swings dance band to get into full swing for Lindy-Hop pros like John Sargent and Samanta Papa-Sargent.Among those having a ball were event co-chairs Michael and Lois Hodes; Charles Borek, president of the Alzheimer's Association, Central Maryland; Micki Pellington and John Barnes, board members; Sharon and Doug Strouse, president of American Legal Reporting Inc.; Janice Dent, training director for VIPS Inc.; Betty Shelton and Gloria Muldrow, co-leaders of the Enon Baptist Church Alzheimer's group; Maybian and Dr. Michael Gloth, chief of geriatrics at Union Memorial Hospital; and Dr. John Breitner, chairman of Johns Hopkins University's department of mental hygiene.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
Pacemakers regulate the beat of a weak heart and ease the tremors caused by Parkinson's disease, and now Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers hope the devices also will slow down the symptoms of Alzheimer's. Doctors at Hopkins and four other medical institutions will spend the next year implanting pacemakers in the brains of 40 patients with early-onset Alzheimer's as part of a clinical trial looking at whether deep electric stimulation of the brain can slow down or reverse memory and cognitive declines.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
Everyone forgets a name or a date from time to time. But how do you know when it's something serious? Marina Tompkins, a certified social worker and director of Keswick Multi-Care Center's adult day program, talks about how to tell the difference between normal behavior for an aging population and what could perhaps be the early onset of dementia or Alzheimer's. She says there are actions that people and their families can take: When someone is forgetful, how do you know when to seek help?
NEWS
April 16, 2014
In her commentary, Susan Peschin criticizes the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force for not finding evidence of benefit for screening for dementia as based on sound science ( "Alzheimer's again gets short shrift," April 14). On what else should such a profound public health policy be made? It is interesting she mentions breast cancer , the disease over which we have been fighting the most bitter screening war. For although it makes intuitive sense to screen and catch diseases early, for all our good intentions, the more we learn, the more we are finding that screening has been way oversold in breast cancer and a number of other diseases.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
I write in response to Susan Peschin's recent commentary on Alzheimer's disease ("Alzheimer's again gets the short shrift," April 14). Ms. Peschin contends that we are not doing enough to screen for Alzheimer's Disease, and she faults the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent panel charged with developing guidelines for primary care clinicians, for not recommending widespread dementia testing. As a geriatric physician who has been caring for dementia patients for more than 20 years, I have found several problems with screening.
NEWS
April 18, 2014
Commentator Susan Peschin cites a recent statement by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force that highlights the insufficient evidence around screening for cognitive impairment in older adults, characterizing it as "masking" obstacles to detecting Alzheimer's disease ( "Alzheimer's again gets the short shrift," April 14). However, as chairman of the USPSTF I would like to clarify that the task force recognizes the seriousness of this devastating disease and its impact on millions of older Americans and their loved ones.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 15, 2014
I am standing at the front door, locked out of my own house. If this were a movie, it'd be raining. Thankfully, this isn't so it isn't. But the reality is embarrassing enough without any Hollywood embellishments. You see, we have this digital lock. To open it, you input a numeric code. We bought it months ago and I've been using it without incident. But now, standing out here in the dark, I am, suddenly and for no apparent reason, stuck. After a moment, with more hope than confidence, I punch in some numbers.
HEALTH
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
As an alternative to a traditional nursing home facility, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has turned to a new program in which those in need of assisted-living care are treated in a more intimate setting. Medical foster homes place up to three patients, typically veterans, in the private home of a vetted caregiver who is responsible for their care on a daily basis. Additionally, physicians, therapists, social workers and other VA staffer members regularly work with the patients.
NEWS
April 24, 2014
In his letter to the editor in response to Alliance for Aging Research's CEO Sue Peschin's commentary, "Alzheimer's again gets the short shrift" (April 14), Dr. Andy Lazris of Columbia contends that since there are no effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease there should be no testing ( "Screening for Alzheimer's carries its own risks," April 17). We could not disagree more. There is much both an individual and family can do if they get the devastating news of an Alzheimer's diagnosis.
NEWS
April 22, 2014
I am responding to the letter from Dr. Andy Lazris entitled "Screening for Alzheimer's carries its own risks," (April 17). The Alzheimer's Association supports efforts that increase early detection and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease by trained professionals in a medical setting after a comprehensive evaluation. Today more than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's disease. With an aging baby boomer population, that number is expected to soar to as many as 16 million by mid-century.
NEWS
April 18, 2014
Commentator Susan Peschin cites a recent statement by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force that highlights the insufficient evidence around screening for cognitive impairment in older adults, characterizing it as "masking" obstacles to detecting Alzheimer's disease ( "Alzheimer's again gets the short shrift," April 14). However, as chairman of the USPSTF I would like to clarify that the task force recognizes the seriousness of this devastating disease and its impact on millions of older Americans and their loved ones.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
I write in response to Susan Peschin's recent commentary on Alzheimer's disease ("Alzheimer's again gets the short shrift," April 14). Ms. Peschin contends that we are not doing enough to screen for Alzheimer's Disease, and she faults the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent panel charged with developing guidelines for primary care clinicians, for not recommending widespread dementia testing. As a geriatric physician who has been caring for dementia patients for more than 20 years, I have found several problems with screening.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2012
They may be elderly, frail and dealing with debilitating memory loss, but a lively beat, noisy maracas and an enthusiastic instructor can get them dancing. Deb Shavitz, a Zumba instructor who offers residents at Sunrise at Pikesville a free class each week, is convinced that music can jog the memory. "Music transcends everything," she said. "I don't care what the doctors say. Part of that individual still gets the music and I see the sparkle in their expression. " Residents at the assisted living home may not remember her name, but they know she is the "exercise lady," who brings them a routine steeped in the fast-paced Zumba dance genre, rooted in South America and growing in popularity across the U.S. The 58-year-old exercise lady is choreographing her third annual Zumbathon fundraiser for the Alzheimer's Association Sunday, Nov. 4. She hopes to raise $10,000 for research into the disease that is the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States and one that cannot be prevented, cured or even slowed.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Linda Kellar seemed too young for dementia, the slow-forming disease that erodes the memories of people usually much older than the then-54-year-old housewife. But in 2009 that's what doctors found to be the cause of Kellar's severe agitation, memory loss, sleepless nights, babbling and hallucinations. Kellar now spends her days at Keswick Multi-Care Center under constant care because of the disease, which has progressed steadily since the diagnosis. Her husband, Arnold, knows that dementia will eventually take his wife's life.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
In her commentary, Susan Peschin criticizes the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force for not finding evidence of benefit for screening for dementia as based on sound science ( "Alzheimer's again gets short shrift," April 14). On what else should such a profound public health policy be made? It is interesting she mentions breast cancer , the disease over which we have been fighting the most bitter screening war. For although it makes intuitive sense to screen and catch diseases early, for all our good intentions, the more we learn, the more we are finding that screening has been way oversold in breast cancer and a number of other diseases.
NEWS
By Susan Peschin | April 14, 2014
This is getting old. Every time our nation has an opportunity to do something positive in the fight against Alzheimer's disease, we come up short. The latest example is the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, the independent panel charged with developing guidelines on preventive care services for primary care clinicians and health systems. The task force came to the conclusion that there is not enough evidence to warrant population screening for cognitive impairment in older adults in America.
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