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Alydar

SPORTS
By Bill Christine and Bill Christine,Los Angeles Times | July 12, 1991
Last February, J.T. Lundy, the president of Calumet Farm, was in San Francisco, receiving 1990 Eclipse Awards for being the best breeder and for Criminal Type, the Horse of the Year.Two months later, Lundy resigned as president, and yesterday, after a succession of stories in the racing trade press about clients suing Calumet, the historic farm filed two Chapter 11 bankruptcy petitions in Lexington, Ky., listing debts of about $135 million.John Ward, who replaced Lundy as president of Calumet, said the 869-acre farm is for sale and added: "We needed protection from the courts so that we could go on and do business."
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SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | November 27, 1994
For the first time in the 23-year history of the Eclipse Awards, the 1994 Horse of the Year honor will be announced in Washington.Members of the Thoroughbred Racing Associations, which represents the bulk of North American racetracks, are breaking from tradition this year.Normally, the TRA's annual convention, and accompanying Eclipse Awards dinner, is held at some cushy warm-weather location such as Palm Springs, Calif., or Miami.This year it means Jimmy Croll, owner-trainer of likely winner Holy Bull, will have to leave his winter headquarters in South Florida and head north to accept racing's biggest prize.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 30, 1991
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Nick Zito wants to compare Strike the Gold to Alysheba. Let him indulge. There are enough similarities for a pre-Derby mix of a little realism, a little dreaming and a lot of hope.Alysheba, racing's all-time leader in money earnings, won the Kentucky Derby four years ago. It was, officially, his second career victory. He had won the Blue Grass Stakes in his final start before the Derby but was disqualified for a bumping incident.Now, Strike the Gold, trained by Zito, enters off a win in the Blue Grass, his second career victory.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | May 18, 1991
How could it be? How could a single moment be so splendid and awful? Sum up all that is grand and tragic about a place? Can there be a moment of such profound irony anywhere other than in a Hollywood script?The answer is yes. It happened when Strike the Gold crossed the finish line ahead of 15 horses at Churchill Downs on May 4, winning the Kentucky Derby. Splendid, awful, grand, tragic -- the victory was all that to Calumet Farm, the horse fame to which all aspired for so long.It sent a message to everyone in racing that Calumet, which bred Strike the Gold and owned him for two years, still had a knack for producing champions.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Staff Writer | January 28, 1994
If you think about it, whatever horrible curse has befallen actress Susan Lucci now seems to have enshrouded the Super Bowl-bound Buffalo Bills.Fourteen times, Susan Lucci has been nominated for a Daytime Emmy for her work on the popular soap "All My Children."And 14 times, the poor woman has watched as some other actress yelps with joy, rushes to the podium and cradles a gleaming gold trophy while dabbing her eyes with a Kleenex.Could you blame Ms. Lucci if she came home every day and threw a shoe at the dog?
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | July 26, 1991
LAUREL -- Peter Pugh pulls on his red baseball cap with the blue lettering that spells "Calumet Farm," and hops into his pickup truck."You wanna know what really makes me mad? People that dump this farm," the 39-year-old trainer said."I hear it all the time -- 'hey, have you got paid yet?' -- stuff like that. They would be so lucky to have even one son of Alydar standing in their shedrow."The litany goes on, ever since the world-renowned farm, the farm that is synonymous in this country with horse racing and Kentucky bluegrass, filed for bankruptcy on July 11.A week earlier Pugh shipped into Laurel with the bulk of what is left of the Calumet Farm racing string -- 10 horses, including two sons of Alydar, named Joy Maker and Aly Fresco; Beautiful Gold, a daughter of champion sire Mr. Prospector out of Calumet's champion filly, Before Dawn, and seven other royally-bred, though heavily leveraged, horses.
SPORTS
By ASSSOCIATED PRESS | March 18, 1991
HALLANDALE, Fla. (AP) -- Strike the Gold trainer Nick Zito says his colt is gaining on Florida Derby winner Fly So Free."Sooner or later, we'll catch up to him," Zito promised.Strike the Gold was a surprise runner-up in Saturday's Florida Derby at Gulfstream Park. He rallied from last through the final turn and closed within a length of Fly So Free early in the stretch, but the horses ran even the final 70 yards."I wasn't worried," said Fly So Free trainer Scotty Schulhofer, whose colt is the Kentucky Derby favorite.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1995
Tim Kelly, Jimmy Toner and Dick Delp -- trainers of the top three contenders in today's Grade II $200,000 Barbara Fritchie Handicap at Laurel Park -- all concede one point.If any of them is going to pocket the trainer's share of $12,000 for saddling today's winner, each of their horses must catch Queen Suite.The daughter of Bates Motel, trained at Laurel by Ron Benshoff, is the target for the connections of the three highweights.Kelly jokes about slipping into Laurel under the cloak of darkness and carrying off the Fritchie spoils.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service ` | July 18, 1991
Racing officials reported yesterday that prices were down nearly 11 percent in the final tally of the prestigious July sale of selected yearlings at Keeneland race course in Lexington, Ky.But they expressed relief that there had been no worse decline in a market that had already plunged 40 percent in the preceding five years.They also acknowledged again that the market was still being saved by heavy spending by investors from the Arab nations and Japan, who once more dominated the two days of auction sales that closed Tuesday night.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | August 16, 1992
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. -- November Snow raced into the lead of the 3-year-old filly division yesterday when she outran six of the fanciest fillies in the land and won the 112th Alabama Stakes by a nose.It was the second major victory in two weeks for November Snow, who won the Test Stakes here on the first weekend of Saratoga's rousing season. And she achieved it with a drive along the rail in the deep homestretch that nipped Saratoga Dew by the length of her nose, with the favored Pacific Squall nearly two lengths farther back and the popular Easy Now finishing seventh and last.
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