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By James Dulley | July 13, 1991
Q: Will stapling inexpensive aluminum foil under the roof rafters really reduce the heat inside my house?A: Installing a radiant barrier (foil) in your attic can dramatically lower your air conditioning bills and improve your comfort. You can easily install it yourself in a few hours with common hand tools.Even if you air-condition seldom or not at all, a radiant barrier can greatly improve your comfort level, especially in second-floor bedrooms.A radiant barrier is a material that blocks radiant heat energy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Carol Frey from Baltimore was looking for a recipe she has lost for making a ricotta cheesecake. Thomas Scavuzzo from Rosedale shared an old family recipe from the Renna Dairy Co. in Rosedale, Pa. His grandparents owned the dairy, which closed in 1965. The instructions that came with his recipe were very basic. While cheesecakes are not difficult to make, there are a few golden rules one should try and follow when making them. Start by making sure all your ingredients are at room temperature; take care not to overbeat them; and because cheesecake is essentially custard, it is best to bake it in a water bath.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1997
What a dark time it was in the American kitchen: 1926, a year before the dawn of the Age of Convenient Wrapping.There was butcher paper, a waxed paper available in sheets from the meat market, but little else was available to protect food from spoiling in a sea of air and ambient smells. No Baggies. No Saran Wrap, Ziplocs, Reynolds Oven Bags or Hefty OneZips. No Reynolds Wrap. Not even Cut-Rite Wax Paper in the box with the serrated metal cutting edge -- wax paper as handy as water from a kitchen sink.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special To The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2012
Wanda Reynolds from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for baked shad. She remembered seeing a recipe for making the fish some years ago in a local newspaper. She thought the recipe called for a long baking time that helped soften the bones. Pamela Green from Arnold sent in a recipe that she says she found in either The Washington Post or the Capital in Annapolis in the 1980s that calls for wrapping the fish in foil and baking it for six hours at a very low temperature.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2006
Aluminum foil was everywhere. It was used to build boats, planes and towers. It even broke the fall of dozens of eggs dropped yesterday during a physics tournament at Liberty High School in Eldersburg. Nearly 300 students used the shiny metal during the Central Maryland Physics Olympics. The theme of this year's competition was aluminum. Most of the 30-minute events required participants to build things with aluminum foil and to consider its use in 20 thought experiments. Event organizers hope the competition will stimulate interest in physics.
FEATURES
April 6, 1996
Around the houseKeep kitty off couch. Scatter sheets of aluminum foil on furniture where you don't want the cat to land. The noise will discourage your pet from getting too comfy.When storing hard-boiled eggs, write the date on the shells to keep track of their freshness.To clean compact discs, remove dust with a soft, dry cloth; rinse with cold water, and wipe dry with a clean, soft cloth in strokes from the center of the disc to the edges.Pub Date: 4/06/96
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | August 7, 1991
Picture this Hollywood scenario: A mad scientist and his young protege gleefully examine a carefully prepared contraption, then cautiously place it in a scary-looking heating machine.They put on goggles and radiation-resistant smocks and run into a glass-encased fortress. With brows sweating and hands trembling, they turn the machine on with a remote control.Sparks bounce against the interior walls of the machine, causing the material inside the contraption to smoke. Reluctantly, the scientists turn off the machine.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 17, 1996
If you were told this technique of baking in individual tasty packages was termed "en papillote," you might well pass over the recipe without a second glance, especially if you were in a hurry.But this quick-baking version doesn't call for the traditional parchment paper cut with its rather involved enclosure; rather, simply use aluminum foil folded so the food inside will steam.The ingredients are very simple and yield a mellow flavor when baked. A mild whitefish fillet can be substituted for the tuna pictured here.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
This Sunday, the Ravens will have to brave frigid Foxborough, Mass. to take on the New England Patriots. But you won't have to stand out in the cold to make these ribs. Instead of a grill, you can use your oven to roast this tender, savory game-time snack. No-grill BBQ ribs Makes 1 rack 1 full rack of ribs (country or baby back) 1/2 cup orange juice Juice of 2 limes 2 tablespoons honey 1 teaspoon liquid smoke Extra-large aluminum foil 1 cup of your favorite bbq sauce Spice rub 5 tablespoons brown sugar 3 tablespoons chili powder 1 tablespoon garlic powder 11/2 teaspoon ground cumin 11/2 teaspoon ground coriander 11/2 teaspoon onion powder 11/2 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon dry sage 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon cayenne powder In a bowl, combine all of the dry rub ingredients.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2003
Helen M. Huebel of Parkville requested an Accordion Treat Cookies recipe. She said she had "scoured cookbooks and papers. [They are] very tender cookies and the batter was poured into accordion-pleated aluminum foil to bake." From Kathy Catlin of Severn came the chosen response. She wrote: "Many years ago, this was the recipe used for a National Grange cooking contest. My mother made it then, and I have kept the recipe." Accordion-Pleated Cookies Makes 4 dozen cookies 1/4 cup butter, softened 3/4 cup granulated sugar 2 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 1/4 cups sifted flour 1/2 cup chopped nuts, if desired heavy-duty aluminum foil confectioners' sugar, optional Cream the butter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
This Sunday, the Ravens will have to brave frigid Foxborough, Mass. to take on the New England Patriots. But you won't have to stand out in the cold to make these ribs. Instead of a grill, you can use your oven to roast this tender, savory game-time snack. No-grill BBQ ribs Makes 1 rack 1 full rack of ribs (country or baby back) 1/2 cup orange juice Juice of 2 limes 2 tablespoons honey 1 teaspoon liquid smoke Extra-large aluminum foil 1 cup of your favorite bbq sauce Spice rub 5 tablespoons brown sugar 3 tablespoons chili powder 1 tablespoon garlic powder 11/2 teaspoon ground cumin 11/2 teaspoon ground coriander 11/2 teaspoon onion powder 11/2 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon dry sage 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon cayenne powder In a bowl, combine all of the dry rub ingredients.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2011
While the en papillote ("in parchment") method of cooking might sound a little too fancy for tailgating, Mark Graham, in his Dinner Tonight column for the Chicago Tribune, has suggested that it's really nothing more than food wrapped in parchment paper and cooked. What may sound intimidating turns out to be a handy method for cooking at a tailgate or other outdoor party. The packets can be easily assembled at home and then grilled at the tailgate party. They travel well in a cooler of ice. Instead of parchment paper, which can be tricky for first-time users, his recipe uses foil for these salmon-and-veggie packets.
NEWS
By Sandra Pinckney | October 12, 2008
Autumn is my favorite time of year. I love the changing leaves, the cool temperatures, decorating with pumpkins and having a wide variety of vegetables in season. Root vegetables like squash, rutabagas, turnips, carrots, sweet potatoes and beets are all at their peak now. They not only are plentiful, but are powerhouses of nutrients. Take beets, for instance. They are loaded with iron, potassium, calcium and zinc. I know beets don't make it on most lists of favorite foods, but I grew up eating them.
NEWS
October 5, 2008
Victim's relative helps stymie car-theft attempt A Shady Side woman who saw her car being stolen contacted a relative, who blocked the only exit from the neighborhood, forcing the driver to back it into a ditch, police said. The woman told police about 4 p.m. Tuesday that she had seen three men take her Mercury sedan, which was parked in front of her home on Columbia Beach Road. She contacted her stepfather, who blocked the exit from the neighborhood, police said. The driver of the Mercury tried to turn around but backed into a ditch.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2006
Aluminum foil was everywhere. It was used to build boats, planes and towers. It even broke the fall of dozens of eggs dropped yesterday during a physics tournament at Liberty High School in Eldersburg. Nearly 300 students used the shiny metal during the Central Maryland Physics Olympics. The theme of this year's competition was aluminum. Most of the 30-minute events required participants to build things with aluminum foil and to consider its use in 20 thought experiments. Event organizers hope the competition will stimulate interest in physics.
NEWS
By Mark Graham and Mark Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 13, 2005
The en papillote method of cooking may sound fancy and intimidating, but it's as simple as wrapping in parchment paper and cooking. Instead of parchment paper, which can be tricky for first-time users, we're using foil for these salmon-and-veggie packets. This dish is easily adaptable to the grill: Place the packets over indirect heat on a closed hot grill until the salmon is cooked through and the veggies are crisp-tender, about 15 to 20 minutes. The foil packets make for a fun presentation and are easy to clean up. Beverage pairing Try a crisp, well-chilled sauvignon blanc.
FEATURES
By Susanne Davis and Susanne Davis,Contributing Writer United Features Syndicate | May 30, 1993
Sealing a chop or a fish fillet in paper wrapping and popping it into a hot oven is hardly a new trick -- the French have done it for centuries. Louis XIV's mistress, Madame de Maintenon, is credited with inventing the technique. She had lamb chops trimmed of their fat and baked en papillote for those times when the royal digestion needed a respite from heavier fare.The beauty of this old method is its relevance to today's low-fat cooking. Meats, vegetables and fruits can all be prepared without adding a drop of fat. In the oven, steam rapidly builds up inside the package to cook the contents efficiently, without any loss of nutrients.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | June 23, 1992
If your typical summer centers on the barbecue grill for fun, food and nutrition, dire warnings of cancer risks probably throw a pall over your party.Cooking at high temperatures, as well as direct contact between food and hot metals or grill smoke, are the culprits.All can be thwarted by packette grilling.The tidiest method is to make one aluminum foil packet per serving.On a large square of heavy duty aluminum foil, stack up the meat, chicken or fish, a potato, some vegetables, a few drops of water, and the herbs and spices of your choice.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | May 25, 2003
Bolton Hill's new b is the perfect summer bistro. It has cafe tables on a tree-lined street in a stately residential neighborhood. It has high ceilings and huge windows. It has slowly revolving ceiling fans -- with air conditioning when necessary, of course. And it serves the kind of food you want to eat in the summer: a clever choice of small plates, light dishes, salads and vegetarian fare (although the offerings aren't limited to those). Yes, I know the name is annoying. For one thing, if you try to look up the phone number on the AT&T Web site, you get an error message saying the name has to consist of at least two letters.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2003
Helen M. Huebel of Parkville requested an Accordion Treat Cookies recipe. She said she had "scoured cookbooks and papers. [They are] very tender cookies and the batter was poured into accordion-pleated aluminum foil to bake." From Kathy Catlin of Severn came the chosen response. She wrote: "Many years ago, this was the recipe used for a National Grange cooking contest. My mother made it then, and I have kept the recipe." Accordion-Pleated Cookies Makes 4 dozen cookies 1/4 cup butter, softened 3/4 cup granulated sugar 2 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 1/4 cups sifted flour 1/2 cup chopped nuts, if desired heavy-duty aluminum foil confectioners' sugar, optional Cream the butter.
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