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NEWS
October 14, 2005
MORE THAN 600 EMPLOYEES AT the Eastalco aluminum smelting plant in Frederick County were given layoff notices yesterday. The plant's owner, Alcoa Inc., says it would like to keep the facility open but can't -- unless the company can find a less-expensive source of electricity. But finding that solution is already generating at least one bad idea from local politicians. The shutdown comes as no surprise. Making aluminum requires a lot of electricity. Currently, Eastalco gets its power from Pennsylvania-based Allegheny Energy, but the discount contract is set to expire at the end of the year.
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NEWS
Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2014
A 57-year-old Glen Burnie man pleaded guilty Tuesday to theft of thousands of aluminum carts from the U.S. Postal Service that will cost more than $2.8 million to replace, according to the U.S. State's Attorney's Office. Officials allege Roland Michael Muir and another man stole about 2,030 containers and sold them to metal recyclers for more than $323,000. Prosecutors said Muir worked for a private mailer company in Baltimore driving a box truck, and from July 2010 to 2014 he drove the truck to two U.S. Postal Service bulk mail centers in Capitol Heights where he took the large containers and loaded them on the truck.
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BUSINESS
October 14, 1990
Aluminum's biggest advantage for recyclersMuch higher resale value. Aluminum fetches 1 cent to 1 1/2 cents per can, or 35 cents a pound (57 cents a pound if baled). Steel is worth less than a quarter of a cent a can, or zero to 2 1/2 cents a pound (7 cents a pound if baled).Steel'sbiggest advantageIts magnetic attraction. Using giant electromagnets, companies mechanically remove steel cans along with other cans from garbage. Even if the consumer can't be bothered, his cans might be recycled.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | December 14, 2012
A Havre de Grace man, who pleaded guilty to stealing tons of aluminum from Aberdeen Proving Ground when he was employed at the installation, was sentenced to a year of home detention by a federal judge Wednesday. In U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Judge William D. Quarles Jr. sentenced Ronald Phillips Baker Sr., 62, to one year of home detention with electronic monitoring as part of five years' probation, according to Rod J. Rosenstein, U.S. Attorney for Maryland. Quarles also ordered Baker to pay restitution of $25,732.38.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | December 14, 2012
A Havre de Grace man, who pleaded guilty to stealing tons of aluminum from Aberdeen Proving Ground when he was employed at the installation, was sentenced to a year of home detention by a federal judge Wednesday. In U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Judge William D. Quarles Jr. sentenced Ronald Phillips Baker Sr., 62, to one year of home detention with electronic monitoring as part of five years' probation, according to Rod J. Rosenstein, U.S. Attorney for Maryland. Quarles also ordered Baker to pay restitution of $25,732.38.
NEWS
June 5, 1991
The Hechinger Co. is launching a special program, "Save Aluminum Cans -- Save the Bay," at 10 a.m. with a "can-cutting" ceremony at its Glen Burnie store, 6704 Governor Ritchie Highway.Hechinger stores will provide recycling bins for cans. All proceeds will be donated tothe Chesapeake Bay Foundation.The program began last September, when a number of Valu Food stores joined forces with the Anne Arundel County school system to raise about $2,000.Recycling aluminum protects landfills, eliminates litter and preserves natural resources.
NEWS
Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2014
A 57-year-old Glen Burnie man pleaded guilty Tuesday to theft of thousands of aluminum carts from the U.S. Postal Service that will cost more than $2.8 million to replace, according to the U.S. State's Attorney's Office. Officials allege Roland Michael Muir and another man stole about 2,030 containers and sold them to metal recyclers for more than $323,000. Prosecutors said Muir worked for a private mailer company in Baltimore driving a box truck, and from July 2010 to 2014 he drove the truck to two U.S. Postal Service bulk mail centers in Capitol Heights where he took the large containers and loaded them on the truck.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | November 27, 1990
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine have observed that abnormally high levels of aluminum produce toxic changes in animal brain cells -- changes that may suggest a link between the metal and human diseases of the brain, such as Alzheimer's.But Dr. Harvey Singer, a Hopkins neurologist, said yesterday that the experiment doesn't answer long-festering suspicions that aluminum causes Alzheimer's and a host of other brain disorders. Further research, he said, is needed before consumers should consider discarding their aluminum pots and pans.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 31, 1992
In the late 1940s, 30,000 people wanted to buy R. Buckminster Fuller's round Dymaxion House, which was made of aluminum and Plexiglas, assembled in a factory, weighed only 6,000 pounds and was designed to be disassembled, tucked into a cylinder and air-freighted anywhere in the world.But only two prototypes were made, and William L. Graham, an entrepreneur from Wichita, Kan., bought both.Last week, Mr. Graham's family announced the donation of the prototypes to the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village in Dearborn, Mich.
NEWS
January 11, 2004
Donald S. Levinson, former president of Tomke Aluminum Co. and a former member of the Maryland Racing Commission, died in his sleep Friday at his winter home in Palm Beach, Fla. He was 91. Mr. Levinson was born in Roanoke, Va., and moved with his family in 1916 to Eutaw Place. He later moved to Ashburton, where he graduated in 1930 from Forest Park High School. He earned his bachelor's degree from Washington & Lee College in Lexington, Va. in 1934. He was president for 50 years of Tomke Aluminum Co., a division of United Iron & Metal Co., until retiring in 1989.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
Three Baltimore men have pleaded guilty to being involved with a scheme to steal imported metal worth $2.6 million from the Port of Baltimore, prosecutors said Tuesday. Thomas Jefferson, 50, and James Robinson, 41, admitted in court Tuesday to conspiring to possess stolen goods from a foreign shipment. In December, Alan Verschleisser, 66, also pleaded guilty to that charge, according to a statement Tuesday from Maryland's U.S. Attorney's Office. Jefferson also pleaded guilty to actually possessing the stolen metal.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2011
John Carroll's K.J. Hockaday set the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association career record for home runs this season with 31. It could be a record that stands for a long time. Next season Maryland, like the rest of the country, will follow the new regulations set forth by the National Federation of State High School Associations' baseball rules committee and outlaw the use of the current aluminum bat. In its place will be a bat that must meet the Batted Ball Coefficient of Restitution (BBCOR)
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2008
Millicent Jordan vividly recalls the first aluminum Christmas tree she ever purchased. She was 22 years old when she saw the sad-looking little silver tree at a garage sale. "It was marvelous," says Jordan, 38, of Forest Hill. "It came with a rotating color wheel that changed the hue of the tree. I was fascinated by it." She purchased the tree - which she still owns - and 16 years later, it is part of a collection of vintage Christmas trees. Today, she is opening an exhibit at the Liriodendron featuring about 30 aluminum trees that are a kaleidoscope of colors, including green, blue, silver, blue and green, and pink.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | August 7, 2008
I have heard about a link between aluminum in antiperspirants and breast cancer. I have also read that aluminum may be associated with Alzheimer's disease. Every antiperspirant I have checked has aluminum as its main ingredient, which worries me. I switched to a deodorant of mineral salts to get away from aluminum, but I've just discovered that it contains alum. Is that aluminum? The crystal works great, but I don't want aluminum in my life in any form. Is there anything I can use that doesn't contain aluminum?
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | April 8, 2008
THE PROBLEM -- Two explanatory panels at the National Katyn Memorial have been damaged for months. THE BACKSTORY -- Vicky Schetelich and her husband, who have lived in Harbor East for nearly three years, take daily strolls along Aliceanna and President streets. They walk past the National Katyn Memorial, a soaring golden statue and fountain that commemorates the 1940 massacre of Polish soldiers by Soviet troops during World War II. Schetelich called the memorial "a little oasis in the middle" of construction that's taken place over the past several years.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2008
Alcoa Inc. Shares tumbled $1.76, or 5.1 percent, to $33.11. Friedman Billings Ramsey & Co. said the world's third-largest maker of aluminum may report less profit than analyst estimates when it releases its results this week.
BUSINESS
By Robert Lee | October 14, 1990
Hoping to pressure Maryland Pepsi bottlers to switch from steel to aluminum cans, Alcoa, the world's largest aluminum company, has targeted Baltimore consumers with an aggressive "green marketing" campaign.But Pepsi and steel recyclers suggest that the Alcoa campaign, which presents aluminum as the environmentally sound alternative to steel, is a case of green marketing in a gray area -- like the muddled debate on cloth vs. disposable diapers.Alcoa has kicked off a joint aluminum-recycling venture with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation in which the foundation receives the total resale value of aluminum cans turned in at special receptacles at Anne Arundel County's 121 public schools and at Valu Food's 12 Maryland supermarkets.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | March 22, 1998
AS WITH most home-improvement projects, the decision to build or screen in a porch or patio is just the beginning of the decisions you have to make. They can be as basic as what kind of screening to use and as frivolous as whether to put a light fixture on the ceiling fan.Let's start with the screening: What kind of structure you decided to build will have some bearing on the screening and the system used to install it. With a wood-frame structure, the...
BUSINESS
August 15, 2007
Maryland : Investing Integral Systems announces buyback Satellite provider Integral Systems Inc. said yesterday that it would pay $27 apiece up to $50 million to buy back as much as 1.85 million shares, or 16.7 percent, of its outstanding common stock. The price represents a premium of 9.5 percent over Monday's closing share price for the Lanham-based company. The tender offer expires at midnight Sept. 11. Tricia Bishop Defense Lockheed wins $23 million pact Lockheed Martin Corp. won a $23 million contract from the U.S. Navy to provide technical services for Aegis weapon systems on Norway's F310-class frigates.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmacy.com | June 14, 2007
I have read that aluminum seems to be associated with Alzheimer's disease. Could the aluminum in antiperspirants increase the risk? What else can you use to reduce underarm sweating and odor? The aluminum/Alzheimer's connection has been debated for decades. Although there is no definitive proof, scientists have linked elevated levels of aluminum to the development of dementia (Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, May). It is not clear whether enough aluminum is absorbed from antiperspirants to pose a problem.
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