Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAltitude
IN THE NEWS

Altitude

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | March 30, 1991
MEXICO CITY -- Experience paid off for the U.S. Davis Cup team yesterday afternoon.Troubled by the 7,250-foot altitude, temperatures near 90 degrees, a festive holiday crowd and his opponent's perfectly executed aggressive game plan, Jim Courier was upset in his Davis Cup debut by Luis Herrera, 6-4, 2-6, 7-5, 6-4.But in the second singles match of the three-of-five-match first-round series, a veteran, Brad Gilbert, defeated Leonardo Lavalle, 6-3, 6-2, 6-7,...
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2014
Bye bye, blimp. Hello, helicopter. For the second time in recent months, Baltimore residents will see an unfamiliar aircraft flying above the city as part of surveying work by the federal government. Last time it was a blimp. This time a helicopter will be flying a lot closer, a lot louder and a lot faster. On Wednesday and Thursday, a helicopter performing an aerial survey of "naturally occurring background radiation" will repeatedly fly over Baltimore at low altitudes and at a speed of about 80 mph, according to the National Nuclear Security Administration.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By ALAN GREENBERG and ALAN GREENBERG,THE HARTFORD COURANT | January 14, 2006
DENVER -- Out here in the thin air, one mile above sea level, a visitor from the lowlands quickly finds himself gasping for breath after serious exertion. It's a physiological fact that when aerobic sports are played at high altitude, the people who live there have an advantage over those who don't. But Bill Belichick habitually scorns that notion, because to give it credence might make his New England Patriots less confident entering tonight's AFC divisional playoff against the Denver Broncos at Invesco Field.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Jimmy Smith knew it was real the first time he walked up the big hill to football practice, his 18-year-old lungs unable to find enough air. In the years that followed, the images of husky linemen, gasping on the sidelines, only confirmed the potency of Colorado's thin, Rocky Mountain air. The Ravens cornerback played at the University of Colorado in Boulder, which sits about a mile above sea level. That's almost exactly the same elevation he and his teammates will encounter at Denver's Sports Authority Field on Saturday when they try to keep their season alive in an AFC divisional-round playoff game against the top-seeded Broncos.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 5, 2012
The last time Pittsburgh Steelers leading tackler Ryan Clark played a game in Denver, he ended up in a hospital having his spleen and gallbladder removed. Since then Clark, who suffers from the sickle cell trait, hasn't played when the team travels to the high-altitude, midwestern state. He will miss his team's playoff game there Sunday as well. The sickle cell trait causes some of the body's red blood cells to change shape and harden, making it hard to carry oxygen throughout the body, said Sophie Lanzkron , a Johns Hopkins associate professor and director of the Sickle Cell Center for Adults at Hopkins.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Marego Athans and Robert Little and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1999
Above 40,000 feet in the air, where Payne Stewart's Learjet was flying before it crashed mysteriously last week, even a top athlete would lose consciousness in about 8 seconds and slip into a frozen death, experts say.Investigators suspect that Stewart's plane lost pressure at high altitude, incapacitating the crew and setting off a four-hour, autopilot ghost flight that ended in a nose-dive crash in South Dakota.Whatever the cause, aviation experts say, the crash should remind passengers -- who tend to ignore flight attendants' preflight safety demonstrations -- that modern jets are little more than tubes of simulated sea level, flying through a sky so inhospitable that it would kill most humans before they took a second breath.
NEWS
By David Kelly and David Kelly,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2003
LEADVILLE, Colo. - Driving up the mountain, Karen Hirsheimer knows she's nearly home when the potato chip bags explode. "They go off like a bomb," she said. "Suddenly there are chips all over the car." Exploding chip bags, cigarettes that snuff themselves in ashtrays, woozy mosquitoes and tepid boiling water are part of life in Leadville, America's highest city. At 10,200 feet, Leadville is twice as high as Denver. Once it was among the richest towns in the United States, when its silver, gold and lead mines drew thousands of rowdy prospectors, giving birth to the Guggenheim and May Co. fortunes.
SPORTS
By Chris Cowles and Chris Cowles,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 28, 2005
MEXICO CITY - The healing process has finally begun for Mexico's national soccer team, and for that they owe a great deal of thanks to their fiercest rival. While the U.S. has lately enjoyed the better of what is considered one of international soccer's most heated rivalries, the once untouchable Mexicans not only earned a deserved 2-1 victory before 100,000 at Azteca Stadium in a World Cup qualifier yesterday, but also gained a modicum of the invincibility they enjoyed for decades until the U.S. emerged as a team to be taken seriously on the world's stage.
TRAVEL
By Sig Mejdal and By Sig Mejdal,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 2, 2001
Looking back, I'm not sure why I was worried about climbing the highest mountain in the world, even though the hardest thing I ever climbed was a flight of stairs. Maybe I just got psyched out. In every group there's always one person you point to as you say to yourself, "If he can do it, so can I." As I waited in a pub in Quito, Ecuador, for the dozen others who would join me on this Andean expedition to Mount Chimborazo, I kept expecting that guy to appear. When we took our seats at the table, I looked around at all the well-conditioned mountaineers full of swaggering tales about traversing knife-edge ridges in howling winds, and the light began to dawn.
FEATURES
By Bob Condor and Bob Condor,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 17, 1996
Some skiers pay a steep price for a week of powder, even if they get good rates on flights, accommodations and lift tickets. That's because even the most savvy traveler can't negotiate altitude out of the deal.Everyone reacts differently to a change in elevation, but it is not unusual for the human body to do a physiological snow-plow during the first few days of a ski trip."You will probably feel the worst about 48 hours after arriving," said Barry Mink, an internist at the Aspen (Colo.)
NEWS
October 8, 2012
Is The Sun's excuse for dismissing President Obama's pitiful debate performance against Mitt Romney really to claim that the whole event was so spiritless and lackluster that it was a wonder viewers could stay awake ("Denver snoozefest," Oct. 5)? That has even less credibility than Al Gore's laughable excuse that Mr. Obama was adversely affected by altitude in the Mile High City. Next we'll hear that First Dog Bo must have eaten the president's debate preparation notes. J. Shawn Alcarese, Towson
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
Michael Phelps has the money to pretty much sleep anywhere, in anything, that he wants. It turns out for the last year or so, the Olympian has been hitting the hay in a high-altitude sleeping chamber. Mention of the so-called "contraption" got a big eye-brow raise out of Anderson Cooper on Sunday's "60 Minutes. " "Inside Michael's apartment, an unusual contraption," Cooper said with drama. "A chamber he sleeps in that simulates high altitude. " And, Cooper added for effect: "He doesn't want anyone to see it, but he was willing to talk to us about it. " Phelps described the weirdness of heading into his bedroom, but then having to enter something else before retiring.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | May 5, 2012
In the four years since he made history at the Beijing Olympics, Michael Phelps concedes losing his focus. But with the London Games looming, the Baltimore swimmer told "60 Minutes" in an interview that will air Sunday that he has gone all-out recently and says he is now approaching the shape he was in before Beijing, where he won an unprecedented eight gold medals. His coach, Bob Bowman, predicts Phelps will again win multiple gold medals for the United States this summer.
SPORTS
Sports Xchange | March 11, 2012
Michael Phelps won his second gold medal of the Columbus Grand Prix by cruising to victory in the 200-meter butterfly Saturday. His time of 1 minute, 55.17 seconds unofficially is the fastest in the world this year. "It's my second-fastest in-season time ever," said Phelps, of Baltimore. "I guess I can't complain too much, but I wanted to break [1:55]. There's some little, small stupid things that I shouldn't be making mistakes doing — a couple of walls I was long on and breathing off the first stroke the last two 50s. It wasn't very good.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 5, 2012
The last time Pittsburgh Steelers leading tackler Ryan Clark played a game in Denver, he ended up in a hospital having his spleen and gallbladder removed. Since then Clark, who suffers from the sickle cell trait, hasn't played when the team travels to the high-altitude, midwestern state. He will miss his team's playoff game there Sunday as well. The sickle cell trait causes some of the body's red blood cells to change shape and harden, making it hard to carry oxygen throughout the body, said Sophie Lanzkron , a Johns Hopkins associate professor and director of the Sickle Cell Center for Adults at Hopkins.
NEWS
May 31, 2011
I read the summary of the Air France crash this morning and I am sadly dismayed at the implications. I am a pilot and have been for 50 years, and I am amazed at the similarity between this crash and the Buffalo airline crash. In both you had the crew reacting to a loss of altitude by pulling up and stalling the aircraft, not once but several times. The Air France crew at the controls were in instrument conditions, and the auto pilot was turned off or disengaged after some turbulence was encountered.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 12, 1991
The National League will pioneer in both high altitude baseball and scuba baseball. Denver-Miami games will really make a splash.Vote Yeltsin, comrades, and you'll never have to vote again!
SPORTS
July 27, 1991
California, his kind of townRookie catcher Pudge Rodriguez of the Texas Rangers, on ESPN's "Baseball Tonight," talked about getting married shortly after being brought up to the big leagues:"Nice honeymoon. Got a big trip. Go to Chicago, Oakland and California. California is one of the best cities in the United States."The quoteCarl Lewis, asked about his chances of breaking Bob Beamon's legendary long jump world record of 29 feet, 2 1/2 inches, set in the high altitude of Mexico City during the 1968 Olympic Games: "Altitude doesn't set world records.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker | andrea.walker@baltsun.com | October 21, 2009
Kevin Crowley's job as a computer salesman for Hewlett-Packard requires a lot of travel, and lately his company is telling him to do it as cheaply as possibly. So even though the Montgomery County resident could fly from any of three nearby airports, he usually bypasses Reagan National and Dulles in search of the cheapest fares. "If I'm going to fly, it's normally going to be from BWI," Crowley said after checking in for a flight to Orlando this week. He said the airport is also easier to drive to than others in the region.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.