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Althea Gibson

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By Andrea Lewis | October 7, 2003
ALTHEA GIBSON has been one of my heroes for as long as I can remember. Tennis was the first sport that I loved when I was growing up, and though Ms. Gibson's tennis career was over well before I knew what "30-love" meant, I can still remember heading off to our Detroit neighborhood playground with the wood racket and can of tennis balls my mother bought me. I spent hours whacking balls against a wall and imagining myself winning Wimbledon just as Althea...
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NEWS
By Andrea Lewis | October 7, 2003
ALTHEA GIBSON has been one of my heroes for as long as I can remember. Tennis was the first sport that I loved when I was growing up, and though Ms. Gibson's tennis career was over well before I knew what "30-love" meant, I can still remember heading off to our Detroit neighborhood playground with the wood racket and can of tennis balls my mother bought me. I spent hours whacking balls against a wall and imagining myself winning Wimbledon just as Althea...
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SPORTS
By Melissa Isaacson and Melissa Isaacson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 29, 2003
CHICAGO - She was a professional golfer, a saxophone player, a blues singer, a teacher, an orator, an actress - and one of the greatest champions in the history of tennis. But the significance of Althea Gibson's life, which ended yesterday at 76, probably is appreciated by far too few. No less a trailblazer than Jackie Robinson and Arthur Ashe, she had accomplishments perhaps more impressive because of her singular place as an African-American female athlete in the 1950s. Gibson was the first African-American to compete in the U.S. championship in 1950 and at Wimbledon in 1951.
SPORTS
By Melissa Isaacson and Melissa Isaacson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 29, 2003
CHICAGO - She was a professional golfer, a saxophone player, a blues singer, a teacher, an orator, an actress - and one of the greatest champions in the history of tennis. But the significance of Althea Gibson's life, which ended yesterday at 76, probably is appreciated by far too few. No less a trailblazer than Jackie Robinson and Arthur Ashe, she had accomplishments perhaps more impressive because of her singular place as an African-American female athlete in the 1950s. Gibson was the first African-American to compete in the U.S. championship in 1950 and at Wimbledon in 1951.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson and Harold Jackson,Sun Staff Writer | January 20, 1995
A major overhaul of Druid Hill Park unveiled yesterday would restore the park's old "Negro" tennis courts as a memorial to Althea Gibson and the late Arthur Ashe -- champions who learned the game when Jim Crow laws prevented blacks and whites from playing together.The tennis memorial is part of a master plan to end years of neglect at Druid Hill, which was designed in 1860 and, with more than 1 million visitors annually, is one of the city's most popular parks.Other proposals include restoring the Sisters Pools and the surrounding meadows and woodlands, expanding and improving the Conservatory gardens, and replanting the Promenade tree rows and restoring the tower at Druid Lake.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 8, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England - Venus Williams proved she can beat her little sister Serena. But can she beat a champ? That's the main question heading into today's Wimbledon women's final as Williams takes on defending champion Lindsay Davenport in an all-American Centre Court classic. It's an occasion filled with great expectations and crammed with potential drama and history. There's Davenport, a tall player with a big game seeking to reassert her dominance in women's tennis while trying to retain a title that has filled her with wonder and confidence.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1999
NEW YORK -- Minutes earlier, Serena Williams had seen No. 1 seed Martina Hingis' backhand fly long. She, Serena, not her older, more celebrated sister, Venus, had just beaten Hingis, 6-3, 7-6 (7-4) for the U.S. Open women's championship. Serena was staggered.As the roar of a standing-room-only crowd rose around her, she screamed, laughed and cried and then ran to kiss her mother, Oracene, and hug her father, Richard, both of whom had coached her to this moment.And now, as she stood, waiting to receive the Open trophy and her check for $750,000, she was still overwhelmed.
SPORTS
By Paul McCardell | April 15, 1997
1945Oct. 30: Brooklyn Dodgers executive Branch Rickey signs Jackie Robinson, infielder with the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro leagues, to a minor-league contract.1946April 18: Robinson makes his minor-league debut for the Montreal Royals, the International League affiliate of the Dodgers.1947The NAACP says 1946 was "one of the grimmest years" in African-American history, with "blowtorch killing and eye-gouging of Negro veterans freshly returned from a war to end torture and racial extermination."
NEWS
February 14, 1995
A recent consultants' report details the many things desperately needed in Druid Hill Park. It also urges that the managers of this 740-acre oasis should capitalize on the park's relationship with the Baltimore Zoo, which occupies 180-acres of the land. Now it is up to city officials to implement the recommendations.Since the consultants' report is largely silent on the costs of all the recommendations, it is illustrative to consider how Druid Hill Park came about, 137 years ago. Although Baltimore was a rapidly growing city in those days, it had no readily available cash to buy a park.
NEWS
February 27, 1995
Consultants are right to underscore that the city's parks and recreation department should capitalize on Druid Hill Park's relationship with the non-profit Baltimore Zoo. Not only has the zoo been located in the park for nearly 120 years but its exhibits today account for a hefty share of the park's year-round visitors.The recommendation is just one of many suggestions that aim to spruce up the 740-acre oasis.Since Druid Hill Park was created in 1858, the open-air greenery has had its ups and downs.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 8, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England - Venus Williams proved she can beat her little sister Serena. But can she beat a champ? That's the main question heading into today's Wimbledon women's final as Williams takes on defending champion Lindsay Davenport in an all-American Centre Court classic. It's an occasion filled with great expectations and crammed with potential drama and history. There's Davenport, a tall player with a big game seeking to reassert her dominance in women's tennis while trying to retain a title that has filled her with wonder and confidence.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1999
NEW YORK -- Minutes earlier, Serena Williams had seen No. 1 seed Martina Hingis' backhand fly long. She, Serena, not her older, more celebrated sister, Venus, had just beaten Hingis, 6-3, 7-6 (7-4) for the U.S. Open women's championship. Serena was staggered.As the roar of a standing-room-only crowd rose around her, she screamed, laughed and cried and then ran to kiss her mother, Oracene, and hug her father, Richard, both of whom had coached her to this moment.And now, as she stood, waiting to receive the Open trophy and her check for $750,000, she was still overwhelmed.
SPORTS
By Paul McCardell | April 15, 1997
1945Oct. 30: Brooklyn Dodgers executive Branch Rickey signs Jackie Robinson, infielder with the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro leagues, to a minor-league contract.1946April 18: Robinson makes his minor-league debut for the Montreal Royals, the International League affiliate of the Dodgers.1947The NAACP says 1946 was "one of the grimmest years" in African-American history, with "blowtorch killing and eye-gouging of Negro veterans freshly returned from a war to end torture and racial extermination."
NEWS
By Harold Jackson and Harold Jackson,Sun Staff Writer | January 20, 1995
A major overhaul of Druid Hill Park unveiled yesterday would restore the park's old "Negro" tennis courts as a memorial to Althea Gibson and the late Arthur Ashe -- champions who learned the game when Jim Crow laws prevented blacks and whites from playing together.The tennis memorial is part of a master plan to end years of neglect at Druid Hill, which was designed in 1860 and, with more than 1 million visitors annually, is one of the city's most popular parks.Other proposals include restoring the Sisters Pools and the surrounding meadows and woodlands, expanding and improving the Conservatory gardens, and replanting the Promenade tree rows and restoring the tower at Druid Lake.
SPORTS
By James Giza and James Giza,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2000
Soft-spoken and demure, professional tennis player Chanda Rubin is not one to crave the spotlight. But she found herself at the forefront of the festivities that took place yesterday on the Druid Hill Park Lakeside Tennis Courts. Rubin, No. 18 in the world, was on hand for the fourth annual Head Kids Fun Day, organized by the Department of Recreation and Parks and the Head Urban All-Star Tennis Academy. From 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., more than 200 kids ages 8 to 16 showed up on the 10 courts in West Baltimore to enjoy a day of tennis with one of the best players in the world.
NEWS
By LISA RESPERS | November 3, 1993
This country has a love affair with sports. From baseball to wrestling, sporting events rake in millions every year.Parents dream of raising super athletes who will tearfully turn to the camera and thank them after winning championships. For the past few weeks, Baltimore has paid more attention to whether it will receive an NFL expansion team than to the fighting in Somalia.Still, there is a stereotype that African-Americans only particpate in certain sports. Too many racial barbs and slurs are based on the fact that there is an abundance of blacks playing football and basketball.
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