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By Jean Thompson and JoAnna Daemmrich and Jean Thompson and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writers | February 16, 1995
The Baltimore school system will "stretch" the criteria used to place disruptive students at its alternative middle school, which should increase its enrollment and remove more troubled children from regular schools, Superintendent Walter G. Amprey said yesterday.Responding to criticisms voiced by City Council members during a public hearing last month, he revised his previous position that Woodbourne Academy would be limited to those students whose behavior problems were most serious or anti-social.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | March 25, 2014
Accused of not hanging up their jackets, two defendants giggled and squirmed in their seats like schoolgirls, which they were. "How do you plead?" asked Leila Pearsall, 8, of Hamilton. "Guilty," said the girls, also 8, who had the option of paying 50-cent fines or being brought up on charges. They were sentenced to 25 minutes of community service: cleaning the play room. The setting was the Judicial Committee room at Arts & Ideas Sudbury School, also known as AI Sudbury. The 6-year-old alternative school, founded in Hamilton and operated as a democratic community managed by students and staff, moved this year to the old St. John's Episcopal Church at Kelly Avenue and South Street in Mount Washington.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1996
The alternative high school that Anne Arundel County educators want to open next year for disruptive teen-agers probably will be housed in a county-owned building at the state complex in Crownsville.County officials, who support the creation of the alternative school, are offering the school system free use of one of the three buildings at the campus off Generals Highway.Ironically, for 15 years the Crownsville complex housed another county program for problem youths -- the Careers Center vocational program for troubled teen-agers, which fell victim to the budget ax in 1993.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | March 7, 2014
I crossed the Patapsco River and arrived in Brooklyn in search of the Chesapeake Center for Youth Development. It was not hard to spot in this neighborhood in the southern section of the city, not too far from the Anne Arundel County line. The Chesapeake Center is housed in an old Brooklyn landmark, the quaint-looking former Crisp Presbyterian Church, on Patapsco Avenue at Third Street. It sits atop a hill, and its belfry is the highest point around. As I arrived from downtown Baltimore, the little chapel seemed a remnant of the one-time village that was Brooklyn before all the industry arrived long before the two world wars.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1994
Campfield Elementary School, closed nine years ago because of declining enrollment and maintained by Baltimore County since, has been returned to the Baltimore County school system, which will expand its alternative middle school there.The school, on Alter Avenue in the Pikesville area, has housed the alternative school since September, when it opened with a capacity of 45 students. Next school year, Campfield will be able to accommodate 100 students from 10 middle schools in the southwest and northwest areas of the county.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,Sun Staff Writer | February 21, 1995
"I don't need no caning," said Tyrone.Tyrone is a young man of indeterminate age. He says he's 13. His teacher says he's 15. He looks 16, but at that legal age for rTC dropping out of school, he probably wouldn't be in this high-ceilinged double classroom on the fourth floor of Sojourner-Douglass College in East Baltimore. He'd be on the street.With 21 other young men and a couple of young ladies, Tyrone is enrolled in the Tri-School Alternative Project, an effort by three city public middle schools -- Charles Carroll of Carrollton, Dunbar and Lombard -- to remove their worst behavior cases from home schools and subject them to a month of training and counseling about civilized behavior, combined with a dose of rudimentary academics.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2004
For most of the past eight years, Dale Grimes has had his own classroom at the Rosedale Center alternative school. Starting today, he'll have to share. A second alternative school, the Inverness Center, completed a move from its Dundalk facility to the Rosedale Center on Friday. Baltimore County school system officials say the move was necessary because of problems with Inverness' aging building. Each school, geared for students with behavioral problems and other challenges, offers a half-day program.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | December 25, 1999
Students at Baltimore County's six alternative middle and high schools have serious reading problems but only one specialist to help them improve -- an alarming situation that has forced the Board of Education to consider hiring reading specialists at each school next year."
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1998
Howard County Schools Superintendent Michael E. Hickey has proposed a $35.48 million capital budget for next year that includes construction of an alternative school for troubled students and the planning of a new high school in Fulton to open by fall of 2002.The building plan, released yesterday and presented to the school board, also proposes constructing an Ellicott City middle school by 2004 and many additions, replacements or renovations to county schools over the next decade.Officials predict that the school system will have 6,732 new students in the next 10 years, a 17 percent increase.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erika Niedowski and Liz Bowie and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2002
Baltimore education officials reversed course last night and said that an alternative school in Hampden that was facing closure because its funding had been cut will get the money it needs to stay open after all. Chief Academic Officer Cassandra W. Jones said that the Learning Cooperative, a school for 24 teen-age students who have dropped out or failed grades at regular city public schools, will get about $140,000 for the current year -- the same amount...
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
After four years of deliberation, the Maryland school board passed new disciplinary regulations Tuesday that will end a zero-tolerance policy that sent home large numbers of boys, special education students and African-Americans for minor infractions. Education experts said they believe Maryland is among the first states to take the step toward a less-punitive disciplinary code that will require administrators to use suspensions as a last resort. Students who are violent or bring weapons to school will still receive swift and tough punishment.
NEWS
May 6, 2013
Baltimore schools CEO Andrés Alonso's resignation at the end of this academic year is a major blow to a city whose trajectory he helped change. There can be little doubt that the energetic and rapid reforms he implemented in the city's long-struggling school system have set the stage for broader renewal and growth in Baltimore. But city leaders also need to look on his departure as a tremendous opportunity, a chance to bring in a new superintendent who will build on Mr. Alonso's successes.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
When John Thompson was growing up in a blue-collar area of Pittsburgh, he knew he likely wouldn't become a third-generation steelworker. Buoyed by his father's belief that teaching was an important profession, he took a circuitous route toward education - and he discovered a drive and desire to help the underprivileged and underserved. Currently, Thompson is assistant principal at Phoenix Center Annapolis, the state's only school that serves students with disabilities from kindergarten through the 12th grade.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
It began as many confrontations between students do: with a hard stare between two passing strangers, according to Toni Holmes, a senior at an Ellicott City alternative school. One of the girls told a friend, "I don't like her. " Snide remarks about clothing and appearance went back and forth, and then other girls chimed in. Soon, unexplained yet simmering enmity exploded into a series of face-to-face confrontations among about 20 girls at the Homewood Center. Teachers got hurt preventing the arguments from becoming physical, and hallways were often deemed unsafe.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2011
Maryland's school board will consider passing a regulation that would limit the time a school district can keep a student out of school waiting for a decision on the appeal of a suspension or expulsion. After a Fairfax County, Va., student committed suicide following a long suspension from school, the Maryland board asked state administrators to survey school systems for their policies. "It is clear what happened in Fairfax could happen in any district in Maryland," board member Kate Walsh said Tuesday after seeing the survey results.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 20, 2009
At the Baltimore premiere of "Precious," Jacqueline Robarge, the founder of Power Inside, a support group for women in jail or at risk outside, and Adam Rosenberg, executive director of Baltimore Child Abuse Center, declared that the domestic atrocities depicted in the film occur every day - and that facing them squarely provides hope as well as release. This movie proves them right. In the end, it's cathartic and exhilarating. Gabourey "Gabby" Sidibe is an emotional lodestone as Precious, an obese teenager whose life is filled with horror.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2004
The stage - if you can call a patchwork of 6-inch risers a stage - was set up in the school's "gymteria," a room that is part gymnasium, part cafeteria. A computer cart covered with a white paper tablecloth served as a diploma table. There seemed to be no rhyme or reason to the colors of caps and gowns worn by the graduates. But none of that mattered. The hundreds of parents and cousins, aunts and uncles, siblings, teachers and counselors who crowded into the Gateway School on Tuesday night came for one reason: to see 24 students - many of whom never expected to make it through high school - receive diplomas.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2004
In the first days of her last year of high school, 16-year-old Brittany Decker hugged her teachers - and mouthed off to them. Sometimes scowling and sullen, the girl who already had been kicked out of three Carroll County high schools swept notebooks from her desk to the floor and punched lockers in frustration. Piercings hugged the arch of her eyebrow and flashed from her nose and tongue. Nine months later, Brittany rolls her eyes in disgust when friends act up. She earned an A and B in her first community college classes this semester and plans to apply next year to four-year, Christian colleges.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | November 18, 2009
The Chesapeake Alternative School in South Baltimore will remain open for the rest of the school year after being assured by the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services on Tuesday that there had been a misunderstanding about funding cuts. Chesapeake, a nonprofit that teaches students who have been referred to Juvenile Services, had issued a news release saying it would close its doors Friday after funding had been cut from $1.3 million annually to $350,000. The school serves about 40 students who often have a history in the juvenile justice system and have gotten into trouble for drugs or theft.
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