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NEWS
September 6, 2013
Live at Montpelier! fall concert series opens with American singer-songwriter and artist Joseph Arthur, Friday, Sept. 6, at 8 p.m. at the Montpelier Arts Center, 9652 Muirkirk Road. His alternative rock performance incorporates use of sound-modifying equipment including distortion and loop pedals. Tickets, $30. Montpelier members and seniors (age 60 and over) eligible for 10 percent discount. Advanced purchase encouraged. To purchase tickets, call 301-377-7800; stop by center, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily; or go to arts.pgparks.com .
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NEWS
September 6, 2013
Live at Montpelier! fall concert series opens with American singer-songwriter and artist Joseph Arthur, Friday, Sept. 6, at 8 p.m. at the Montpelier Arts Center, 9652 Muirkirk Road. His alternative rock performance incorporates use of sound-modifying equipment including distortion and loop pedals. Tickets, $30. Montpelier members and seniors (age 60 and over) eligible for 10 percent discount. Advanced purchase encouraged. To purchase tickets, call 301-377-7800; stop by center, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily; or go to arts.pgparks.com .
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FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 19, 1991
For a lot of music fans, alternative rock seems the only choice there is. Unable to subsist on a diet of classic rock leftovers and unable to swallow the likes of Tesla, Nelson or Winger, these fans seek sustenance outside the mainstream. They listen to college stations instead of the local album rock outlet, read Spin instead of Rolling Stone and prefer "120 Minutes" to anything else on MTV.Occasionally, some of their favorites do cross over, gathering enough of a following to play the same arena circuit as mainstream rock stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2011
CBS radio is billing it as "the alternative rock music Baltimore grew up and the personalities who made it popular" returning to the airwaves starting at noon today with the debut of HFS at 97.5 FM on the local radio dial. Featured artists on the playlist will include:  Foo Fighters, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Pearl Jam, Coldplay, Incubus, and Green Day, according to the station's release. Station personalities will include: Tim Virgin, Gina Crash, Jenn Marino,Chris Emery, and Neci.  One  question is whether HFS will be going for the some of the same audience as WTMD-FM, the Towson Unibversity station?
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - No parents, no teachers, no principals or any other real authority figures are anywhere in sight, so behavior isn't closely monitored much here. Naturally, nearly everyone cuts loose, lets it all hang out - literally and figuratively. Giggling girls run in and out of the men's restroom. Reefer smoke mingles with the greasy scent of fries and chicken fingers. Welcome to the HFStival at RFK Stadium. This is the annual all-day rock extravaganza put on by the "true alternative" rock station, 99.1 WHFS and sponsored by the likes of Miller Lite, Subway, Bacardi, Starbucks and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO | August 17, 2006
Teddy Geiger Singer-songwriter Teddy Geiger has a knack for being ahead of the game. At age 8, the self-taught musician was writing and arranging songs on piano and guitar. Now 17, he played guitar, bass, drums and piano on his debut, Underage Thinking. His songs have a folk-rock sound with elements of alternative rock. Teddy Geiger plays the 9:30 Club, 815 V St. N.W., Washington, on Wednesday. Doors open at 7:30 p.m., and tickets are $15. Call 800-955-5566 or visit tickets.com.
NEWS
January 16, 2005
DUDES, A MOMENT of silence, please, or perhaps better yet a full-blown garage band romp and rattle in memory of WHFS, the FM radio station that passed away this week. WHFS suffered a fate common enough in radio: It changed formats. Suddenly. Goodbye alternative rock. As of Wednesday at noon, 99.1 FM is occupied by El Zol, a Spanish-language blend of Caribbean and Central American dance music. Fans of The Hives and White Stripes will have to go elsewhere. Owner Infinity Broadcasting sees a bigger future in the growing Latino culture.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2001
The death of George Harrison at the age of 58, another milestone in the mortality of the baby boomer generation, brings to an end an improbable life of music, movies, stardom and solitude. When he was born in 1943, the sons of Liverpool bus conductors did not grow up to be huge international stars. In England, such status was reserved for the offspring of royalty and other members of the narrowly defined upper class. Along with Paul McCartney, whom he met on the bus to school, John Lennon and Ringo Starr, the Beatles changed that, becoming the first members of the working class in England to rise to world acclaim.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1998
Art Alexakis, frontman of the hard-driving, alternative band Everclear, is a rock star who helps load kids on to the bus for his daughter's kindergarten field trip.He's also a rock star who's not afraid to reveal his sensitive side, especially when it comes to Bruce Springsteen's "Thunder Road.""I get chills every time I hear that song," he says from his home in Portland, Ore. "I know it's not very punk rock to say that."And the refreshing dichotomies that define Alexakis and Everclear don't stop there.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 30, 1995
As the latest Lollapalooza tour makes its way across America (and on to Charles Town, W.Va., this Thursday), two points keep recurring: First, that alternative music is now the mainstream, and second, that the punk revolution has finally ended in victory.As for the first, there's little room for debate. Such second-generation rockers as Bob Dylan, Van Morrison and Pink Floyd are being shouldered aside on radio and TV to make room for next-generation stars like U2, the Cranberries and R.E.M.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO | August 17, 2006
Teddy Geiger Singer-songwriter Teddy Geiger has a knack for being ahead of the game. At age 8, the self-taught musician was writing and arranging songs on piano and guitar. Now 17, he played guitar, bass, drums and piano on his debut, Underage Thinking. His songs have a folk-rock sound with elements of alternative rock. Teddy Geiger plays the 9:30 Club, 815 V St. N.W., Washington, on Wednesday. Doors open at 7:30 p.m., and tickets are $15. Call 800-955-5566 or visit tickets.com.
NEWS
January 16, 2005
DUDES, A MOMENT of silence, please, or perhaps better yet a full-blown garage band romp and rattle in memory of WHFS, the FM radio station that passed away this week. WHFS suffered a fate common enough in radio: It changed formats. Suddenly. Goodbye alternative rock. As of Wednesday at noon, 99.1 FM is occupied by El Zol, a Spanish-language blend of Caribbean and Central American dance music. Fans of The Hives and White Stripes will have to go elsewhere. Owner Infinity Broadcasting sees a bigger future in the growing Latino culture.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | January 13, 2005
Alternative rock station WHFS (99.1 FM) bit the dust yesterday, unexpectedly switching to a Spanish-language and music format - a decision that jolted the station's many fans. "There was no notice and no explanation," said Cindy Lindstrom, 20, a longtime listener from Perry Hall. "At 12:01 p.m. today, the radio station went silent. At 12:05 p.m., there was music in Spanish. Fifty people must have called me today. Everyone's in shock. No one knows why." In a news release, Joel Hollander, president of Infinity Broadcasting, which owns WHFS, said the format change will serve more than 400,000 Hispanic customers in Baltimore, Washington and Annapolis.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - No parents, no teachers, no principals or any other real authority figures are anywhere in sight, so behavior isn't closely monitored much here. Naturally, nearly everyone cuts loose, lets it all hang out - literally and figuratively. Giggling girls run in and out of the men's restroom. Reefer smoke mingles with the greasy scent of fries and chicken fingers. Welcome to the HFStival at RFK Stadium. This is the annual all-day rock extravaganza put on by the "true alternative" rock station, 99.1 WHFS and sponsored by the likes of Miller Lite, Subway, Bacardi, Starbucks and others.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2001
The death of George Harrison at the age of 58, another milestone in the mortality of the baby boomer generation, brings to an end an improbable life of music, movies, stardom and solitude. When he was born in 1943, the sons of Liverpool bus conductors did not grow up to be huge international stars. In England, such status was reserved for the offspring of royalty and other members of the narrowly defined upper class. Along with Paul McCartney, whom he met on the bus to school, John Lennon and Ringo Starr, the Beatles changed that, becoming the first members of the working class in England to rise to world acclaim.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 3, 1998
They say it's wrong to judge a book by its cover, but what about judging a pop star by his hits?If all you know about Beck is what you hear on the radio, odds are you think of him as a wry, funky guy. Thanks to such hits as "Loser," "Where It's At" and "New Pollution," he seems the perfect post-modern pop star, grounding his smash-and-grab arrangements in grooves borrowed from hip-hop and funk.Seen through those songs, he seems the weisenheimer alterna-rock cousin of the Beastie Boys. But if that's the sort of sound you expect from "Mutations" (DGC 25309, arriving in stores today)
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | January 13, 2005
Alternative rock station WHFS (99.1 FM) bit the dust yesterday, unexpectedly switching to a Spanish-language and music format - a decision that jolted the station's many fans. "There was no notice and no explanation," said Cindy Lindstrom, 20, a longtime listener from Perry Hall. "At 12:01 p.m. today, the radio station went silent. At 12:05 p.m., there was music in Spanish. Fifty people must have called me today. Everyone's in shock. No one knows why." In a news release, Joel Hollander, president of Infinity Broadcasting, which owns WHFS, said the format change will serve more than 400,000 Hispanic customers in Baltimore, Washington and Annapolis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1998
Art Alexakis, frontman of the hard-driving, alternative band Everclear, is a rock star who helps load kids on to the bus for his daughter's kindergarten field trip.He's also a rock star who's not afraid to reveal his sensitive side, especially when it comes to Bruce Springsteen's "Thunder Road.""I get chills every time I hear that song," he says from his home in Portland, Ore. "I know it's not very punk rock to say that."And the refreshing dichotomies that define Alexakis and Everclear don't stop there.
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