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By Brian Fitzmaurice and Brian Fitzmaurice,Special to The Sun | January 13, 1995
Alternative radio, a staple of Baltimore's musical life for more than 25 years, is experiencing a resurgence with the growing popularity of two small stations fighting for the hearts of progressive rock fans.WHFS, the granddaddy of area alternative rock stations, now shares the airwaves with the progressive free-form station WRNR in Annapolis and an Adult Album Alternative station from Philadelphia that sends its signal to the area via WKHS on the Eastern Shore.But even as those stations are generating excitement among listeners, WHFS is enjoying some of its strongest ratings ever.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 2, 2008
More stations, playing different kinds of music, with better sound. HD Radio, offering all those features, sounded like a natural. But five years after its introduction, digital radio, even with all its technological bells and whistles, is still struggling to gain a foothold in the American marketplace. "We're where we'd like to be, but we'd like to make it go quicker," says Bob Struble, president and chief executive officer of Columbia-based Ibiquity Digital, which developed and licenses the HD Radio technology.
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By Alan Sculley and Alan Sculley,Special to the Sun | October 28, 1994
For most of the past decade, Bryan "Dexter" Holland figured his future would be in a science lab, where as a budding microbiologist he'd been cloning viruses in hopes of improving treatments of genetic diseases.Lately, though, as his "hobby" has begun to take on a life of its own, Holland has had to put his scientific plans on hold.Holland, guitarist/singer for the Orange County, Calif., punk band The Offspring, has watched two of his band's songs -- "Come Out And Play" and more recently "Self Esteem" -- become major alternative radio hits.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 16, 1995
After a couple of albums and a lot of touring, most bands would be overjoyed to hear that their latest album is beginning to catch on with radio. But as far as 311 singer/guitarist Nick Hexum is concerned, radio play is a nice plus, but it's not really anything he much thinks about."
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 16, 1995
After a couple of albums and a lot of touring, most bands would be overjoyed to hear that their latest album is beginning to catch on with radio. But as far as 311 singer/guitarist Nick Hexum is concerned, radio play is a nice plus, but it's not really anything he much thinks about."
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By Betty Webb and Betty Webb,Cox News Service | September 20, 1991
MENTION alternative music and many people conjure up visions of Jane's Addiction, with lead singer Perry Farrell passing out into the drums.Or worse.But alternative music has many faces, not all of them strange. There are the art-rock enthusiasms of Pere Ubu, the lyricism of The Candy Skins, the strong melody line of Chapterhouse and the psycho-folksiness of Richard Thompson.And even the hilarious "theater criticism" of Crowded House, whose single "Chocolate Cake" takes a few below-the-belt potshots at composer Andrew Lloyd Webber.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | January 7, 1994
David Broza is a folk-rock musician in the truest sense of the term. "When people ask me, 'So who would be your biggest influences?' I say, 'Jimi Hendrix and Woody Guthrie,' " he explains.Born in Israel, Broza "grew up" on Woody Guthrie. "My mother was a folk singer, and that's what we'd hear in the house," he says, over the phone from Tel Aviv. "Then, when I got a guitar and thought about playing, Hendrix was the big thing for me. Or Clapton, or Cream, or anything the Doors did. Anything electric."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 2, 2008
More stations, playing different kinds of music, with better sound. HD Radio, offering all those features, sounded like a natural. But five years after its introduction, digital radio, even with all its technological bells and whistles, is still struggling to gain a foothold in the American marketplace. "We're where we'd like to be, but we'd like to make it go quicker," says Bob Struble, president and chief executive officer of Columbia-based Ibiquity Digital, which developed and licenses the HD Radio technology.
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By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2005
Only in death could WHFS find life. The alternative radio station was pulled from the air in January - an act of mercy after a long death spiral. Ratings had tanked, and WHFS had lost much of the audience and spirit that had made it among the most beloved and progressive stations in the country. But just four months later, HFS is back, staging its popular HFStival today at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, settling into a new home on the dial and making an unlikely climb to the top of the ratings.
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By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | September 26, 1990
Sometimes with a new album it's not the content or the publicity involved, but rather the timing of the release that can dictate success.Take The Connells and their latest work, "One Simple Word."The North Carolina-bred pop band hasn't released anything since "Fun and Games," 18 months ago, but their constant touring and word-of-mouth public relations have found the band entering new markets for concerts with more than marginal success.Being on a tiny label, TVT Records, which doesn't have the funds or the manpower to entice huge sales or MTV air play, singer Doug MacMillan said sometimes it's the legwork of the band members that sell the band.
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By Brian Fitzmaurice and Brian Fitzmaurice,Special to The Sun | January 13, 1995
Alternative radio, a staple of Baltimore's musical life for more than 25 years, is experiencing a resurgence with the growing popularity of two small stations fighting for the hearts of progressive rock fans.WHFS, the granddaddy of area alternative rock stations, now shares the airwaves with the progressive free-form station WRNR in Annapolis and an Adult Album Alternative station from Philadelphia that sends its signal to the area via WKHS on the Eastern Shore.But even as those stations are generating excitement among listeners, WHFS is enjoying some of its strongest ratings ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alan Sculley and Alan Sculley,Special to the Sun | October 28, 1994
For most of the past decade, Bryan "Dexter" Holland figured his future would be in a science lab, where as a budding microbiologist he'd been cloning viruses in hopes of improving treatments of genetic diseases.Lately, though, as his "hobby" has begun to take on a life of its own, Holland has had to put his scientific plans on hold.Holland, guitarist/singer for the Orange County, Calif., punk band The Offspring, has watched two of his band's songs -- "Come Out And Play" and more recently "Self Esteem" -- become major alternative radio hits.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | January 7, 1994
David Broza is a folk-rock musician in the truest sense of the term. "When people ask me, 'So who would be your biggest influences?' I say, 'Jimi Hendrix and Woody Guthrie,' " he explains.Born in Israel, Broza "grew up" on Woody Guthrie. "My mother was a folk singer, and that's what we'd hear in the house," he says, over the phone from Tel Aviv. "Then, when I got a guitar and thought about playing, Hendrix was the big thing for me. Or Clapton, or Cream, or anything the Doors did. Anything electric."
FEATURES
By Betty Webb and Betty Webb,Cox News Service | September 20, 1991
MENTION alternative music and many people conjure up visions of Jane's Addiction, with lead singer Perry Farrell passing out into the drums.Or worse.But alternative music has many faces, not all of them strange. There are the art-rock enthusiasms of Pere Ubu, the lyricism of The Candy Skins, the strong melody line of Chapterhouse and the psycho-folksiness of Richard Thompson.And even the hilarious "theater criticism" of Crowded House, whose single "Chocolate Cake" takes a few below-the-belt potshots at composer Andrew Lloyd Webber.
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By Gary Graff and Gary Graff,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 21, 1992
It's music that doesn't bop or drive or grind or charge.Instead, it washes across your ears in sonic sheets, blending guitars, drums and vocals into dense layers that disregard the standard stereophonic sensibilities of balance, clarity and separation.It's a sound of contradictions -- thick but ethereal, dissonant but melodious, complex but seemingly simple, mostly because it's difficult to pick individual parts out of the deliberately murky mixes.The touchstones are familiar: Any fan of late-'60s psychedelia will hear echoes of the Beatles, Pink Floyd and the Velvet Underground.
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By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sam.sessa@baltsun.com | October 15, 2009
Big crowds don't scare singer/songwriter Ray LaMontagne. It's the little spaces that really unsettle him. For LaMontagne, performing live is such a painfully intimate process, he prefers to play larger venues where he is more removed from the crowd. "I don't like it when my audience is right on top of me," he said. "It's just too close. I need to have some distance from them. I need some space, that's all." LaMontagne will have all the space he needs when he performs with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra today at Strathmore and Friday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
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