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By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | June 5, 1994
When patients in the University of Maryland Medical System are referred to a treatment center near Dickeyville, they are just as likely to receive acupuncture, Chinese herbs or a homeopathic remedy as they are a prescription drug.Murry Nichelson, a 36-year-old man wracked with muscle spasms in his shoulder, went there after deciding surgery was too risky and anti-inflammatory drugs might irritate his stomach. Desperate for help, he said he felt as if a knitting needle were piercing his shoulder.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2013
Sherlock Swann Gillet, a Baltimore County farmer and water utility owner, died Sept. 9. Family members said that he went out for his daily horseback ride in Glyndon and did not return. He was later found in a field. Family members said he fell from his horse and died of his injuries. He was 77. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Charles B. Gillet and Page Swann. His maternal grandfather was Sherlock Swann, a Baltimore postmaster who led the reconstruction of downtown Baltimore and its streets after the Great Fire of 1904.
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NEWS
August 3, 1994
Perhaps it was inevitable that the first director of the Office of Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health would find the pressures of the job untenable. Hampered by a minuscule $2 million budget, caught between the enthusiasm of ardent believers in various alternative methods of treatment and the strict demands and glacial pace of traditional scientific investigations, Dr. Joseph Jacobs announced this week that he would return to his Connecticut home and to other medical pursuits.
EXPLORE
By Cheryl Clemens | January 25, 2012
To understand the impact meditation can have on the human mind, picture a glass of muddy water. If you stir it, the water stays cloudy and anything that might sink to the bottom is instantly sucked back into motion. But if you allow the glass to become still, slowly the dirt settles to the bottom and the water begins to clear. Meditation means different things to different people, but most agree that it is a means of quieting the mind, of stilling the parade of daily distractions and becoming less reactive to the stimulation that assaults our senses and emotions every waking hour.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Staff Writer | December 4, 1993
Tom Peterson stretched comfortably across an examining table at the Centre for Traditional Acupuncture in Columbia, thin needles sticking out like quills from his forehead, feet, hands and bare chest.It was just a "checkup," said the 62-year-old Baltimore resident, who started acupuncture years ago to treat chronic hay fever. "I still have it, but it is much milder."Although tens of millions of Americans like Mr. Peterson have turned to acupuncturists, chiropractors, massage therapists and other practitioners of alternative medicine, they would not get any encouragement from President Clinton's health reform legislation.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 12, 2002
MEMBERS OF the Howard County Cat Club learned about acupuncture for their cats at a meeting Monday at the central library. Glenelg veterinarian Julia Sturm discussed ways that alternative medicine can help animals. "Sometimes it looks like smoke and mirrors and magic," Sturm said. "But you learn to appreciate the subtleties of alternative medicine." Sturm, who practices at Glenelg Animal Hospital, explained that three types of health care go beyond traditional Western medicine: holistic, alternative and complementary.
FEATURES
By Mark Fritz and Mark Fritz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SERVICE | April 7, 1998
ALLENTOWN, Pa. -- Dr. Stephen Barrett bought a little green box that plugs into the wall and pumps out miracles. When a sick person grips an electrode, the gizmo figures out which organ is failing and which homeopathic potion will fix it.That is, at least, the general idea."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 17, 2001
Acupuncturists, aromatherapists, pharmacists, chiropractors and yoga teachers will appear Thursday at the Alternative Medicine/Pain Management Expo at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium. The daylong expo, the first of its kind to be sponsored by the Baltimore County Department of Aging, is designed to teach the benefits and dangers of alternative medicines. "People are mixing herbal therapies with prescription drugs without knowing the side effects," said Arnold J. Eppel, the department's deputy director.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | February 28, 1995
Mary Marzullo, a certified natural health practitioner, believes people should have a choice in their health care. That's why she is organizing an Alternative Medicine Day at Pennsylvania Dutch Farmers' Market Saturday."
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | February 23, 2007
One of the many perks of writing about health is that you end up with a terrific collection of books. A decade ago, most of the tomes on my groaning shelves were the traditional sort - biology textbooks, medical dictionaries, pharmaceutical references and the like. Lately, thanks to a deluge of new titles, I've got an impressive library of books on alternative and complementary medicine, as well. Some are so dense and soporific that I wouldn't recommend them to any but the most determined reader.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 12, 2010
The last time the world heard from R. Barker Bausell, he had emerged from his research chambers at the University of Maryland's Center for Integrative Medicine with an upsetting conclusion: Acupuncture, herbal remedies, megavitamin therapy and other unconventional treatments work no better than a placebo. "They can go on forever" conducting studies, said Mr. Bausell, who had devoted five years to researching the effectiveness of alternative medicine. "They'll eventually find some positive results by chance alone.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | December 11, 2008
Britain to withdraw most troops from Iraq BAGHDAD: Britain announced yesterday that it will withdraw all but a few hundred of its 4,000 soldiers from Iraq by next June, ending a mission that was unpopular at home and failed to curb the rise of Iranian-backed Shiite militias in the south. The decision comes as the U.S. weighs a drawdown in its nearly 150,000-strong force. President-elect Barack Obama has called for withdrawing all combat troops from Iraq by spring 2010, shifting responsibility to the Iraqis for the defense of the country against Sunni and Shiite extremists.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 31, 2008
Beyond its topical use, the outer part of the aloe leaf (the green part, or rind, of the leaf) produces a juice or dried substance called latex, which contains compounds that make for a natural laxative. Products made with various components of aloe used to be regulated by the Food and Drug Administration as oral over-the-counter laxatives. In 2002, however, the FDA required these products be removed from the market or reformulated because of insufficient safety information from manufacturers.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun Reporter | January 24, 2008
R. Barker Bausell says he arrived at the University of Maryland's alternative medicine center with an open mind toward exploring the potential of acupuncture, herbal remedies and other unconventional treatments. But after five years as research director, he quit the Center for Integrative Medicine in 2004, convinced of one thing: None of the alternative treatments he has seen works any better than a placebo. "They can go on forever" conducting studies, Bausell said recently in his office at UM's School of Nursing, where he is a professor.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | October 7, 2007
Kim Holland's biker-chick days were over not long after they began, with the 46-year-old smashed between her Harley and a guardrail in Elkridge, and a bystander saving her right leg by taking off his belt and making it into a tourniquet before paramedics rushed her to the hospital. A week after she arrived at the University of Maryland's Shock Trauma Center - a week filled with operations and skin grafts, narcotics by pill and by pump - she lay in bed. The lights down low, soft music playing to drown out the buzzing and beeping and ringing that make up a hospital's soundtrack, two women slowly waved their arms over Holland's broken body, as if trying to push away the pain.
NEWS
By Jessica Dexheimer and Jessica Dexheimer,SUN REPORTER | June 10, 2007
The graduation ceremony was a little out of the ordinary. Chants of ai-ya, ai-ya echoed through the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School as Diane Connelly, chancellor of Tai Sophia Institute, attempted to regain the audience's attention. Not that this was an unruly crowd: Unlike many graduations Howard County has seen, this one was free of beach balls, air horns or heckling. Instead, audience members were urged to introduce themselves to one another, and Connelly asked grandparents, parents, spouses and children of the graduates to stand up and be recognized for their contributions to the success of the 48 new alumni.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun Reporter | January 24, 2008
R. Barker Bausell says he arrived at the University of Maryland's alternative medicine center with an open mind toward exploring the potential of acupuncture, herbal remedies and other unconventional treatments. But after five years as research director, he quit the Center for Integrative Medicine in 2004, convinced of one thing: None of the alternative treatments he has seen works any better than a placebo. "They can go on forever" conducting studies, Bausell said recently in his office at UM's School of Nursing, where he is a professor.
NEWS
By JULIE BELL and JULIE BELL,SUN REPORTER | March 3, 2006
Suffering from multiple sclerosis, Cynthia Crowner sees her neurologist and physiatrist regularly. But the 57-year-old Annapolis resident also pays regular visits to a spacious examining room on the wooded campus of the University of Maryland's Kernan Hospital near Dickeyville. There she discusses her degenerative nerve disease with Dr. Brian Berman, a family medicine professor who runs the university's Center for Integrative Medicine. Satisfied that Berman has heard her out, Crowner leaves with a bottle of homeopathic pills and advice to add seaweed to her diet.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | February 23, 2007
One of the many perks of writing about health is that you end up with a terrific collection of books. A decade ago, most of the tomes on my groaning shelves were the traditional sort - biology textbooks, medical dictionaries, pharmaceutical references and the like. Lately, thanks to a deluge of new titles, I've got an impressive library of books on alternative and complementary medicine, as well. Some are so dense and soporific that I wouldn't recommend them to any but the most determined reader.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | June 2, 2006
Americans spend an estimated $20 billion a year on dietary supplements and "natural" remedies. Many of us are blissfully - even willfully - ignorant of the medicinal value, or lack thereof, in these products. It's not entirely our fault that we buy this stuff so blindly. In 1994, Congress limited the power of the Food and Drug Administration to regulate supplements and herbal medicines, which are allowed to get - and stay - on the market unless clear evidence of harm is found. We have been left largely to our own devices to figure out which alternative remedies work, and are safe, and which are pure snake oil. Happily, a few reasonably trustworthy Web sites have sprung up enabling consumers to evaluate how much credible research there is (or isn't)
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