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NEWS
By LARRY WILLIAMS and LARRY WILLIAMS,IDEAS EDITOR | April 30, 2006
Consider the good news about $3-, $4- or $5-a-gallon gasoline. Running out of cheap gas is inevitable and can set the stage for a transition to greatly increased use of forms of energy other than oil to fuel our cars and trucks, heat our houses and generate our electricity. The sooner we start that transition, many energy experts agree, the less painful it will be. The world now uses more than 26 billion barrels of oil a year, but new discoveries of oil in recent years have been averaging less than 7 billion barrels yearly.
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NEWS
July 30, 2012
When political conservatives start talking about raising taxes, it's wise to pay attention. Such is the case with a recently-announced campaign by a former South Carolina congressman who believes solving the nation's energy and climate change challenges requires a tax on carbon. The goal of the Energy and Enterprise Initiative, according to Robert "Bob" Inglis Sr., a six-term congressman who lost reelection in a 2010 GOP primary (his support for the 2008 federal bank bailout having hurt him with the tea party movement)
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NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 23, 2007
FRANKLINTON, N.C. -- President Bush, an admittedly undistinguished history student in college, is devoting considerable time these days to scientific matters. Four weeks ago, he toured a chemical plant in Delaware. Earlier this month he visited a Virginia computer-chip manufacturer. On Wednesday, at a hospital in Tennessee, he watched a video of a surgical robot excising cancerous tissue, prompting his host to ask, "You OK with the blood?" And yesterday, he studied what it will take to put cellulosic ethanol in your tank.
NEWS
April 5, 2012
Peter Morici attacks President Barack Obama for pursuing an energy policy which seeks to develop alternative energy sources ("Obama's bad bet," April 3). He brings up the Solyndra debacle, begun under theGeorge W. Bush administration, as evidence that we should just "drill, baby, drill" and deal with the environmental risks engendered. The problem with Solyndra was ultimately a political one, and it certainly should not be taken as evidence that we should stop seeking alternative energy sources.
BUSINESS
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2006
Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates recently invested millions in it. Morgan Stanley is a huge player. And scores of venture capitalists are starting to take a look as well. We're talking corn, not cyberspace. Once the domain of farmer-funded cooperatives in Midwest backwaters, grain-based ethanol has become a rock star of energy investments as Wall Street money chases new projects from California to Maryland, where at least two efforts to build production plants are gaining momentum. "Wall Street has woken up and seen what farmers have created and are saying, `Hey, we want a piece of this, too,'" said Bob Dinneen, president of the Renewable Fuels Association, a Washington-based trade group.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | September 24, 2006
Carroll County commissioners have recommended giving the Lehigh Cement Co. another a year to store dried, pelletized sewage sludge, known as biosolids, at its Union Bridge plant as the company continues to test the alternative fuel in its kiln. The six-month testing period was to conclude in November, with a county amendment allowing the temporary storage of biosolids to expire at that time. But the supply of biosolids - trucked in from Synagro-Baltimore LLC - has been inconsistent, Lehigh officials said.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
A congressman and a former director of the Central Intelligence Agency yesterday warned that the country is flirting with economic disaster by depending so heavily on Middle East oil, and he encouraged Maryland to move forward with plans to build an alternative fuel plant. "Depending on Middle East oil has been a bad idea for a long time," said R. James Woolsey, "and after the morning of Sept. 11 it became a national security issue for even the dimmest bulb in Washington." Woolsey, who served as CIA director in 1993 and 1994, spoke at the Maryland State Ethanol Workshop, which attracted representatives from technology companies, farm organizations and federal and state governments.
NEWS
April 5, 2012
Peter Morici attacks President Barack Obama for pursuing an energy policy which seeks to develop alternative energy sources ("Obama's bad bet," April 3). He brings up the Solyndra debacle, begun under theGeorge W. Bush administration, as evidence that we should just "drill, baby, drill" and deal with the environmental risks engendered. The problem with Solyndra was ultimately a political one, and it certainly should not be taken as evidence that we should stop seeking alternative energy sources.
NEWS
By Dan Gibbard and Dan Gibbard,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 15, 2007
BLAIR, Wis. -- Even in the fringe world of alternative fuels, vegetable oil has mostly remained on the margins, the domain of a few do-it-yourselfers who have rigged their diesels to run on old fryer fat, making the rounds of local burger joints to fill their tanks. But the veggie power movement is about to stick one greasy toe into the mainstream, as a company in this western Wisconsin town prepares to open what its owners believe is the first recycling and filling station for waste vegetable oil in the Midwest, and one of just a couple in the nation.
NEWS
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | April 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's plan to break the U.S. addiction to oil is languishing as Congress pushes instead for measures designed to address voters' more immediate concern about rising gasoline prices. With prices at the pump expected to jump 25 cents a gallon over those seen last summer, the president's goals for energy independence appear to have sunk close to the bottom of Congress' election-year priority list. "I'm looking forward to working with Congress when they get back, to make sure we invest wisely in new technologies" that will encourage use of alternative fuels, Bush said last week.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | June 22, 2008
With fuel prices soaring, Mark Nagurney thought he had figured out a clever way to drive free - and save the Earth at the same time. The 49-year-old Laurel physicist is one of thousands nationally who have converted their diesel cars and trucks to run on straight vegetable oil. But in burning a cleaner fuel than diesel, Nagurney never imagined he'd end up on the wrong side of federal environmental laws. Or break Maryland's fuel tax regulations, which require even folks driving on grease thrown away by fast-food restaurants to get a "special fuel" license, obtain a $1,000 bond from an insurance company, file monthly forms and pay the same 24 cents per gallon tax as drivers using diesel.
BUSINESS
By Ana Campoy and Ana Campoy,The Wall Street Journal | May 11, 2008
Before Akshay Dodeja stopped to fill up the gas tank of his Acura Integra, the 22-year-old Portland, Ore., computer engineering student checked his cell phone. There, he found the cheapest gas from a list of 10 stations in the area. So in the end, he paid $3.63 a gallon - compared with the $3.80 that the most expensive station was charging. Getting the best deal on gasoline used to be a matter of comparing prices posted at stations on opposite street corners. But with fuel taking a bigger bite out of budgets, some drivers are obsessed with finding the best possible price in a wider geographic area.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | November 20, 2007
CHICAGO -- Ethanol, the centerpiece of President Bush's plan to wean the U.S. from oil, is 2007's worst energy investment. The corn-based fuel tumbled 57 percent from last year's record of $4.33 a gallon and drove crop prices to a 10-year high. Production in the United States tripled after Morgan Stanley, hedge fund firm D.E. Shaw & Co. and venture capitalist Vinod Khosla helped finance a building boom. Even worse for investors and the Bush administration, energy experts contend ethanol isn't reducing oil demand.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN REPORTER | September 13, 2007
State government is pledging to increase its use of ethanol- and biodiesel-powered cars and trucks and to triple the number of hybrids in its fleet by 2011. The three-member Board of Public Works approved the policy yesterday, applauding the move as a way to bring Maryland into an eco-friendly future. "Even though it is a small step, it is something that is concrete and solid and we can focus on it," said Comptroller Peter Franchot. "We're leading by example." The cornerstone of the plan calls for 40 percent of state vehicle purchases over the next three years to be cars and trucks that operate on biofuels, principally ethanol and biodiesel.
NEWS
By Dan Gibbard and Dan Gibbard,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 15, 2007
BLAIR, Wis. -- Even in the fringe world of alternative fuels, vegetable oil has mostly remained on the margins, the domain of a few do-it-yourselfers who have rigged their diesels to run on old fryer fat, making the rounds of local burger joints to fill their tanks. But the veggie power movement is about to stick one greasy toe into the mainstream, as a company in this western Wisconsin town prepares to open what its owners believe is the first recycling and filling station for waste vegetable oil in the Midwest, and one of just a couple in the nation.
NEWS
By Maura Reynolds and Maura Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | March 10, 2007
Sao Paulo, Brazil -- President Bush and Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva set aside past differences yesterday and announced a new partnership to promote the use of alternative fuels to reduce the Western Hemisphere's dependence on fossil fuels. Da Silva, whose left-of-center government has been critical of Bush on Iraq and the environment, suggested that the two countries can work pragmatically on issues of common interest even if they disagree in other areas. "After all, we ... who have polluted the world so much in the 20th century, need to make our contribution to de-polluting it in the 21st century," da Silva said after showing off a state-of-the-art fuel depot outside Sao Paulo.
NEWS
By Achim Steiner | February 13, 2007
As international representatives gather tomorrow for the Washington Legislators Forum to discuss climate change, they will do so understanding that 2006 was the year when "climate change" and "biofuels" became part of the common lexicon - and not a moment too soon. A new breed of "prospectors" have set off a rush to claim their stakes in the green gold of biodiesel and ethanol. Driving their stakes in the exploding markets for alternative fuels, these prospectors - farmers and financiers - invested $2 billion last year, a trend that is likely to continue as the world's energy demand is projected to increase as much as 50 percent over the next two decades.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN REPORTER | September 13, 2007
State government is pledging to increase its use of ethanol- and biodiesel-powered cars and trucks and to triple the number of hybrids in its fleet by 2011. The three-member Board of Public Works approved the policy yesterday, applauding the move as a way to bring Maryland into an eco-friendly future. "Even though it is a small step, it is something that is concrete and solid and we can focus on it," said Comptroller Peter Franchot. "We're leading by example." The cornerstone of the plan calls for 40 percent of state vehicle purchases over the next three years to be cars and trucks that operate on biofuels, principally ethanol and biodiesel.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 23, 2007
FRANKLINTON, N.C. -- President Bush, an admittedly undistinguished history student in college, is devoting considerable time these days to scientific matters. Four weeks ago, he toured a chemical plant in Delaware. Earlier this month he visited a Virginia computer-chip manufacturer. On Wednesday, at a hospital in Tennessee, he watched a video of a surgical robot excising cancerous tissue, prompting his host to ask, "You OK with the blood?" And yesterday, he studied what it will take to put cellulosic ethanol in your tank.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | February 18, 2007
Green investing is no longer just for those who celebrate Earth Day. Decades of talk about alternative fuels and green technologies has turned energy independence into a national priority. The investment category that focuses on the environment and alternative-energy sources has earned a position in the mainstream financial world. Some shares have been in a slump during the oil price decline over the past several months and have historically moved with that indicator. Even though oil is primarily used for transportation while most alternative energy is for electricity and heat generation, the two are intertwined in the public consciousness.
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