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NEWS
February 3, 2012
It is unfortunate that commentator Charles Campbell's recent criticism of the current administration's handling of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline was so supercilious ("D.C.'s Keystone Kops," Jan. 30). He made valid points: Wind and solar power are inconstant and must be supplemented. Their installations can be intrusive and demand lots of space. And the broader question of our energy problem is enormously complex. However, that does not justify our failure to invest in alternative energy sources the way other countries have.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | May 20, 2014
The late, great New York senator, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, famously said, "You are entitled to your opinion, but you are not entitled to your own facts. " That sentiment, however wise, seems sadly quaint in an era when many Americans strongly prefer a "reality" that conforms to their opinion, not to objective facts. A fresh case in point is Marco Rubio, the boyish Florida senator who is considered a serious contender for the U.S. presidency in 2016. Sunday, on ABC's "This Week," Mr. Rubio said, "I do not believe that human activity is causing these dramatic changes to our climate the way these scientists are portraying it," adding that he also did "not believe that the laws that they propose we pass will do anything about it, except it will destroy our economy.
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NEWS
June 3, 2007
Big Coal: The Dirty Secret Behind America's Energy Future By Jeff Goodell Our reliance on coal -- the unmentioned foundation of our "information" economy -- has, Goodell says, led to an "empire of denial" that blocks us from the investments necessary to find alternative energy sources that could eventually save us from fossil fuel. Goodell's description of the mining-related deaths, the widespread health consequences of burning coal and the impact on our planet's increasingly fragile ecosystem makes for compelling reading.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
At Tom and Marcia Lewis' house in Annapolis, the future meets the past. Last year the couple installed solar panels on the roof of their 110-year-old frame house in the city's Historic District. "We're very much in favor of alternative energy sources," Marcia Lewis says. Residential solar energy sales are booming in the United States, and property owners are increasingly finding ways to combine historic preservation with energy preservation. The Lewises had their panels installed on the back roof of their three-story home on Conduit Street.
NEWS
April 5, 2012
Peter Morici attacks President Barack Obama for pursuing an energy policy which seeks to develop alternative energy sources ("Obama's bad bet," April 3). He brings up the Solyndra debacle, begun under theGeorge W. Bush administration, as evidence that we should just "drill, baby, drill" and deal with the environmental risks engendered. The problem with Solyndra was ultimately a political one, and it certainly should not be taken as evidence that we should stop seeking alternative energy sources.
NEWS
By DAVID NITKIN | September 16, 2008
Four environmental groups endorsed Democrat Frank Kratovil yesterday and attacked the record of his opponent, Republican state Sen. Andy Harris, in the race for Congress in the 1st District, which includes all of the Eastern Shore and portions of four other counties. Harris' positions in Annapolis "have shown me that he is consistently anti-solar power, anti-energy efficiency and pro-dirty power," said Brad Heavner, the state director of Environment Maryland, which made its endorsement yesterday, along with the League of Conservation Voters, the Sierra Club and Clean Water Action.
NEWS
February 10, 2012
If Michale Barr ("Let market decide when wind blows," Feb. 7) is correct that technologies succeed only when the free market aligns to demand and finance them, then we have wasted billions on the development of such crackpot schemes as aviation, satellite communications, hydro-power, interstate highways, nuclear energy, global positioning and, perhaps the biggest government boondoggle of all time, the Internet. The government led all of these efforts when all the market demanded was faster horses, better steam locomotives and more whale oil. By positioning Maryland as a frontrunner in developing clean, alternative energy sources, Gov.Martin O'Malleyis asking us to create an state where future generations have the infrastructure needed to prosper.
NEWS
November 19, 2003
CHINESE LEADERS are worried about their nation's growing dependence on imported oil. What's more, pollution from such fossil fuels threatens to become a parallel concern as China's booming economy matures. So they've hit upon an obvious energy strategy that has somehow eluded U.S. lawmakers: conservation. In what should be an embarrassing juxtaposition for leaders here, China is moving to impose tighter fuel-efficiency rules on cars and SUVs than the U.S. requires, while Congress is adopting an opposite approach - boosting domestic production of fossil fuels to meet all-but-unchecked demand.
NEWS
May 1, 2005
HE'D WAVE a magic wand, if he could. He'd hold hands with a Saudi prince, and he did. He'd even sign the bill passed by the House last month that includes generous tax breaks for the highly profitable oil and gas industry he admits are unnecessary. President Bush's desire to look as if he's trying to do something about soaring gasoline prices seems sincere enough. The cost of fuel is a pocketbook issue that could be a real threat to Mr. Bush's party at the polls. And yet he's ignoring the chance to use his leadership and political clout to help Americans save money at the pumps in the quickest, most environmentally friendly way possible: by using less gas. If the president would throw his support behind raising the fuel-efficiency standards for SUVs and light trucks, he'd be doing a great favor for owners of the ubiquitous gas-guzzling vehicles.
NEWS
September 3, 2006
Jerome Foster Date of Birth: Oct. 10, 1951 Party affiliation: Democrat Professional experience: Retired Army warrant officer Education: Dundalk High School; Columbia College, Mo. Personal: Married; six children; wife is also a retired veteran. What is the most important issue facing Harford County? The most important issue facing Harford County is BRAC; this initiative will transform the fiber of the county and have an effect on education, transportation, law enforcement, the business community and every other aspect of the county.
NEWS
April 5, 2012
Peter Morici attacks President Barack Obama for pursuing an energy policy which seeks to develop alternative energy sources ("Obama's bad bet," April 3). He brings up the Solyndra debacle, begun under theGeorge W. Bush administration, as evidence that we should just "drill, baby, drill" and deal with the environmental risks engendered. The problem with Solyndra was ultimately a political one, and it certainly should not be taken as evidence that we should stop seeking alternative energy sources.
NEWS
February 10, 2012
If Michale Barr ("Let market decide when wind blows," Feb. 7) is correct that technologies succeed only when the free market aligns to demand and finance them, then we have wasted billions on the development of such crackpot schemes as aviation, satellite communications, hydro-power, interstate highways, nuclear energy, global positioning and, perhaps the biggest government boondoggle of all time, the Internet. The government led all of these efforts when all the market demanded was faster horses, better steam locomotives and more whale oil. By positioning Maryland as a frontrunner in developing clean, alternative energy sources, Gov.Martin O'Malleyis asking us to create an state where future generations have the infrastructure needed to prosper.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
It is unfortunate that commentator Charles Campbell's recent criticism of the current administration's handling of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline was so supercilious ("D.C.'s Keystone Kops," Jan. 30). He made valid points: Wind and solar power are inconstant and must be supplemented. Their installations can be intrusive and demand lots of space. And the broader question of our energy problem is enormously complex. However, that does not justify our failure to invest in alternative energy sources the way other countries have.
NEWS
By Jim Tankersley and Jim Tankersley,Tribune Washington Bureau | February 7, 2009
WASHINGTON -President Barack Obama's plans to lead America from recession rest in part on a task bigger than a moon shot and the Manhattan Project, as complicated as any feat of economic engineering in the nation's history. His goal, which past presidents have spent more than $100 billion chasing with limited success, is to replace imported oil and other fossil fuels with a so-called "clean energy economy" powered by the wind, the sun and bio-fuels. The stakes are high. If Obama succeeds, he could spark a domestic jobs boom and lead an international fight against climate change.
NEWS
By DAVID NITKIN | September 16, 2008
Four environmental groups endorsed Democrat Frank Kratovil yesterday and attacked the record of his opponent, Republican state Sen. Andy Harris, in the race for Congress in the 1st District, which includes all of the Eastern Shore and portions of four other counties. Harris' positions in Annapolis "have shown me that he is consistently anti-solar power, anti-energy efficiency and pro-dirty power," said Brad Heavner, the state director of Environment Maryland, which made its endorsement yesterday, along with the League of Conservation Voters, the Sierra Club and Clean Water Action.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
WASHINGTON - Charts at the ready, notes spread out before him, Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett begins another address in the House of Representatives on the dangers of America's dependence on oil. The Western Maryland Republican has given nearly 50 such speeches at the Capitol in the past three years, most of them variations on a theme: that a coming decline in petroleum production, coupled with growing demand for energy, will have a calamitous impact on the...
NEWS
January 18, 2008
When it comes to energy, there's talk and then there's action. The talk is often right on target - promote conservation, alternative energy sources and a cleaner environment. But what happens when people actually start doing something about it? Unfortunately, you can end up with a light bulb brouhaha. In Western Maryland, the president of Allegheny Power, the region's primary utility, had to apologize to his customers for sending them two energy-saving light bulbs. Turns out people didn't like getting billed for unsolicited light bulbs, and now the company will refund their money.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
At Tom and Marcia Lewis' house in Annapolis, the future meets the past. Last year the couple installed solar panels on the roof of their 110-year-old frame house in the city's Historic District. "We're very much in favor of alternative energy sources," Marcia Lewis says. Residential solar energy sales are booming in the United States, and property owners are increasingly finding ways to combine historic preservation with energy preservation. The Lewises had their panels installed on the back roof of their three-story home on Conduit Street.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | May 25, 2008
Relaxing with his feet propped up in his enclosed patio, Eastern Shore waterman Paul Abey hears chirping martins and lapping bay waves. He also hears a low-pitched whir. "It's a good sound," Abey said of the hum coming from blades spinning atop a 45-foot tower on the edge of his front lawn. "I've cussed the wind all my life," the Green Point crabber added, "but now I don't mind." That's because he knows that, with every swish of his windmill, he's saving money. His step away from traditional power sources reflects an increasing interest nationwide in what are known as small wind energy systems.
NEWS
January 18, 2008
When it comes to energy, there's talk and then there's action. The talk is often right on target - promote conservation, alternative energy sources and a cleaner environment. But what happens when people actually start doing something about it? Unfortunately, you can end up with a light bulb brouhaha. In Western Maryland, the president of Allegheny Power, the region's primary utility, had to apologize to his customers for sending them two energy-saving light bulbs. Turns out people didn't like getting billed for unsolicited light bulbs, and now the company will refund their money.
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