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By Chicago Tribune | November 11, 1990
HELEN, Ga. -- Back in the 1960s, Ray Sims used to stand outside his Gulf filling station hosing down the pavement next to the two-lane road that ran through town. He would watch four or five cars pass by in the morning. He would watch the same cars zoom back by in the afternoon. Helen, he noticed, was not on the highway to the future.Worried that Helen would soon be a ghost town, Mr. Sims and other citizens began to ponder how they could induce the passing cars to stop. They considered the town's liabilities, notably the half-dozen squat, cement buildings that called themselves a downtown.
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SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
A 14-year-old Gilman snowboarder won silver and bronze medals in the United States of America Snowboard Association National Championships this month. Ethan Coherd finished second in the parallel slalom and third in the parallel giant slalom at the snowboarding championship in Copper Mountain, Colo. His twin brother, Christian, finished 14th in slalom and 15th in giant slalom. Both train with the Ski Roundtop Racing Club in Lewisberry, Pa., and qualified for the national championships after strong regional performances.
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SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | February 25, 2006
TED LIGETY TV: NBC, 8-11:30 p.m. -- In ski circles, he's called "Ligety Split." Everyone else these past two weeks has known him as "that other American skier." No, he's not Bode Miller. Ted Ligety is the one who's actually won a medal here in Turin. If you could see him racing down the mountain, you'd know exactly why Ligety Split is the more apt nickname. The American alpine skiers at these Games have been somewhat of a disappointment, but Ligety represents the United States' best chance to save face today.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
Picture a house magnificently perched on a hill in Cockeysville with windows overlooking a garden oasis in the foreground and, beyond, a rippling one-acre lake. There is not another house as far as the eye can see from the top of a stone staircase leading off the home's large deck and winding along an alpine garden path to a swimming pool and gazebo. The path continues onto a stone bridge over a cascading stream with a 17-foot drop over waterfalls sliding toward a pond. Beyond the pebble path, a fanciful teahouse rises up from a grassy plain.
TRAVEL
November 11, 2007
ON THE NET Managing Alpine Future: alpinefuture.com Centre for Mountain Studies: cms.uhi.ac.uk Alpine Convention: www.alpconv.org Keep Winter Cool: keepwintercool.org
NEWS
March 7, 2005
MARYLAND Four state athletes win Special Olympics medals Four Maryland Special Olympic athletes are bringing home seven medals when they return today from the 2005 World Winter Games in Nagano, Japan, officials have announced. Among them will be figure skater Katie Proia, 15, of Clarksville, featured in The Sun last month, who won a silver medal for singles and a silver medal for skating with a guest skater. Josh Smith, 22, of Sykesville earned a gold medal for alpine intermediate downhill, another gold medal for alpine intermediate slalom and a bronze medal for alpine intermediate giant slalom.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | June 22, 1998
Just when you thought there was no place left to plaster advertising, someone has come up with one: grocery checkout dividers.The dividers are those black or gray rubber tubes you put between your lettuce and corn flakes and those of the next person in line at the supermarket.A California company, Alpine Promotions, has come up with the idea of using them to advertise not only in-store products like Wrigley's gum, but also things like new films and theme parks."All we've done is turn these unsightly rubber sticks into something attractive to both shoppers and advertisers," says Glenn Hogle of Alpine.
NEWS
December 30, 1992
Columbia center slates multimedia art exhibitThe Columbia Art Center in the Village of Long Reach will launch the New Year with an exhibit of multimedia creations by the New Arts Alliance, a diverse group of artists who live in Howard County.The show, "Masquerade," will run from Jan. 7 to Feb. 6 and will feature juried works that reflect various mask-making techniques well as masquerade themes.To launch the gallery show, a free, opening reception will be held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Jan. 7 at the Columbia Art Center.
FEATURES
By Jay Clarke and Jay Clarke,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 26, 1993
My wife and I weren't wearing lederhosen and boots when we drove into the mountain town of Helen, Ga., but maybe we should have been.After all, Helen looks more like it belongs in Germany's alpine region than in northeast Georgia.Just about every building here resembles an alpine chalet, with steep red terra cotta roofs, walls decorated with painted alpine scenes and flowered window boxes. The shops have names like House of Tyrol and sell such things as cuckoo clocks and beer steins. Restaurants offer sauerbraten, schinken (ham)
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
KVITFJELL, Norway -- Talk about quiet confidence.U.S. Alpine skier Tommy Moe yawned three times just before he left the gate in the men's Super G yesterday.Then he won a silver medal."I was relaxed, knew where I wanted to go and how I was going to do it," said Moe, who turned 24 yesterday. "The pressure is off because I've already won a gold medal. Everything is going great for me right now. Really, all I have to do is show up."Four days after a stunning victory in the downhill, Moe became the first American to win more than one medal in skiing since Penelope Pitou in 1960, and the first American male to win more than one medal in the same Olympics.
SPORTS
By Rhiannon Walker and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Alpine skiing coach Diane Mikulis watched as the body language of her Special Olympic athletes - including Marylander Jake Reynolds - transformed one day last month from mildly interested to awe-struck. They had just entered Herb Brooks Arena in Lake Placid, N.Y., where international flags hung majestically from the rafters and where banners and murals honored historic athletic events. The skiers listened to a brief history of the venue and now were being told they were going to be allowed on the ice. They grinned widely, and a smile slowly crept onto Mikulis' face, too, as her skiers restlessly and excitedly waited to descend the stairs.
SPORTS
By Chris Dufresne and Tribune Olympic Bureau | February 23, 2010
WHISTLER, British Columbia - Based on Olympic Alpine results so far, Austria has to be flat, like Kansas. The country's strengths are likely table tennis or microbrewing - it can't be Alpine skiing. As the Vancouver Games enter their last week, Austria's manly ski men have yet to earn a medal. They'll get their next chance in the men's giant slalom Tuesday at Whistler Creekside. With any luck, 45 guys will fall down and Austria can sneak in for the bronze. The women have two medals - the same number as one American: Julia Mancuso, who hadn't finished top-three in a race that mattered in two years.
TRAVEL
By Michael Workman and Michael Workman,michael.workman@baltsun.com | December 7, 2008
As the bus lumbered up the snowy road, winding higher and higher toward the top of the mountain, my only thought was, "What has he gotten us into?" "He" was my uncle, and the bus was climbing to the top of Grosse Scheidegg, a 6,434-foot peak in Switzerland, where passengers would hop off the bus and sled back to the bottom of the icy road. At one point, the driver stopped to put chains on the tires before continuing to drive at a steep angle through blind twists and turns, making the idea of sledding back down (and possibly encountering the next bus)
TRAVEL
November 11, 2007
ON THE NET Managing Alpine Future: alpinefuture.com Centre for Mountain Studies: cms.uhi.ac.uk Alpine Convention: www.alpconv.org Keep Winter Cool: keepwintercool.org
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | February 25, 2006
TED LIGETY TV: NBC, 8-11:30 p.m. -- In ski circles, he's called "Ligety Split." Everyone else these past two weeks has known him as "that other American skier." No, he's not Bode Miller. Ted Ligety is the one who's actually won a medal here in Turin. If you could see him racing down the mountain, you'd know exactly why Ligety Split is the more apt nickname. The American alpine skiers at these Games have been somewhat of a disappointment, but Ligety represents the United States' best chance to save face today.
SPORTS
By CHRIS DUFRESNE and CHRIS DUFRESNE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 25, 2006
SESTRIERE, Italy -- It was a gold-medal run you didn't have to see to believe because you couldn't really see it. Julia Mancuso, a shadowy figure representing the United States, descended from the starting gate into a snowstorm and ultimately emerged at the foggy bottom as the winner of the women's Olympic giant slalom yesterday. Mancuso's time of 2 minutes, 09.19 seconds flashed onto the leader board between snow squalls, and it was clear enough to earn the American the victory by .67 of a second over Tanja Poutianen of Finland.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
A 14-year-old Gilman snowboarder won silver and bronze medals in the United States of America Snowboard Association National Championships this month. Ethan Coherd finished second in the parallel slalom and third in the parallel giant slalom at the snowboarding championship in Copper Mountain, Colo. His twin brother, Christian, finished 14th in slalom and 15th in giant slalom. Both train with the Ski Roundtop Racing Club in Lewisberry, Pa., and qualified for the national championships after strong regional performances.
SPORTS
By Rhiannon Walker and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Alpine skiing coach Diane Mikulis watched as the body language of her Special Olympic athletes - including Marylander Jake Reynolds - transformed one day last month from mildly interested to awe-struck. They had just entered Herb Brooks Arena in Lake Placid, N.Y., where international flags hung majestically from the rafters and where banners and murals honored historic athletic events. The skiers listened to a brief history of the venue and now were being told they were going to be allowed on the ice. They grinned widely, and a smile slowly crept onto Mikulis' face, too, as her skiers restlessly and excitedly waited to descend the stairs.
SPORTS
By CHRIS DUFRESNE and CHRIS DUFRESNE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 19, 2006
SESTRIERE BORGATA, Italy -- The surprise winner of yesterday's super-giant slalom conducted his post-race news conference in perfect English and could boast this day of being "best in the world." It wasn't an American hanging gold around his neck, though, it was Norway's Kjetil Andre Aamodt, a Thor-like throwback who skied away a winner despite whispers shortly after he had arrived that he slightly resembled a plow horse. Balding, aging and out of breath has never been a recipe for winning gold in alpine skiing, but there has never been anyone quite like the 34-year-old Aamodt.
SPORTS
By CHRIS DUFRESNE and CHRIS DUFRESNE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 18, 2006
SESTRIERE, Italy -- The wind may not be blowing America's way yet in the Olympic alpine events, but it's definitely blowing. With 3 1/2 events completed in the mountains, the United States has one medal, Ted Ligety's gold in combined, with possibly more wind chill to come. Severe winter weather turned Wednesday's women's combined event upside down. High winds forced the postponement of the shortened downhill in San Sicario Fraiteve after one racer, Croatia's Nika Fleiss, took off on a jump and almost got flipped upside down by a gust.
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