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By Molly Dunham and Molly Dunham,Evening Sun Staff | November 28, 1990
BEFORE ISABEL Wilner's book, "B Is for Bethlehem," hit the stores in September, her editor at Dutton called to gather background details on the book from Wilner."
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SPORTS
November 3, 2004
A is for ACL, where injuries are devastating. B is for Bonds, needed for publicly financed stadiums. C is for Cap room, which determines which teams will and won't contend next year. D is for Dynasties, which don't exist anymore because of C. E is End zone celebrations, T.O.'s territory. F is for Fantasy football, which explains why a Ravens fan might cheer for T.O. G is for Gambling, the national pastime. H is for Holding, which is committed on every play but called only on your team.
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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
And you thought the A-B-Cs were simple. So, at first, did the author and illustrator of B is for Blue Crab (Sleeping Bear Press, $17.95), the new Maryland alphabet book for children. But when it came to representing the state in letters, the process evoked surprising passions. "Everywhere we went ... when I would say I'm working on an alphabet book for Maryland, they would say, `What's `A'?" said Laura Stutzman, the book's illustrator. "It got to be hysterical how people could not resist guessing what the letters were."
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
And you thought the A-B-Cs were simple. So, at first, did the author and illustrator of B is for Blue Crab (Sleeping Bear Press, $17.95), the new Maryland alphabet book for children. But when it came to representing the state in letters, the process evoked surprising passions. "Everywhere we went ... when I would say I'm working on an alphabet book for Maryland, they would say, `What's `A'?" said Laura Stutzman, the book's illustrator. "It got to be hysterical how people could not resist guessing what the letters were."
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | September 12, 1992
Looking for an alphabet book you can count on? A counting book that deserves an A? Here are a few newer ones to check out.* "The Handmade Alphabet," by Laura Rankin (Dial Books, $14, all ages) proves that this genre -- all too often a dumping ground for dull, boring ideas -- can be elevated to an elegant art form.In colored pencil, Ms. Rankin illustrates each letter of the manual alphabet -- a key part of American Sign Language. Each page shows a letter, depicts a hand signing the letter and includes a clue to a word beginning with that letter.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | February 23, 1993
"The Shot!" reveals the depths of dread that syringes can inspire in the owners of young arms, but 9-year-old author Hailey Elizabeth Glanville says it's not a personal account of her fears.Hailey, a fourth-grader at Mechanicsville Elementary School from Finksburg, said she's not afraid of shots. She hit on the idea for "The Shot!" after suffering a brief bout of writer's block when her class was assigned to write books that would be donated to Carroll County General Hospital's pediatric unit.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham and Molly Dunham,Evening Sun Staff | March 20, 1991
BAD ALPHABET and counting books are easy to come by these days. Because the market for children's books continues to grow despite the recession, some publishers rush to print books of dubious quality. A-B-C and 1-2-3 books are easy to slap together, so choose carefully. If it's a crummy book, kids will get bored.Here are some alphabet and counting books that kids of all ages will open again and again, not because ''they're good for you,'' but because they're good.* ''Alison's Zinnia,'' by Anita Lobel (Greenwillow, $14.95)
FEATURES
By MICHAEL DAVIS | February 16, 1992
Author and educator Nikia "Niki" Leopold stands before a window in her spacious country kitchen. Surrounded by barn-wood walls upon which hang an extended family of skillets, she grinds fresh coffee beans, brews a pot and pours two steaming mugs.There's time for coffee and conversation on a midwinter Friday afternoon, a pause during another day of writing, sketching and reflecting for one of Baltimore's more multidimensional talents. After receiving her undergraduate degree in art history from Smith College and a master's from Columbia, she studied seven years at Johns Hopkins University for her Ph.D.
SPORTS
November 3, 2004
A is for ACL, where injuries are devastating. B is for Bonds, needed for publicly financed stadiums. C is for Cap room, which determines which teams will and won't contend next year. D is for Dynasties, which don't exist anymore because of C. E is End zone celebrations, T.O.'s territory. F is for Fantasy football, which explains why a Ravens fan might cheer for T.O. G is for Gambling, the national pastime. H is for Holding, which is committed on every play but called only on your team.
FEATURES
March 1, 1998
Reading starts with recognizing the letters of the alphabet and learning the sounds those letters make. Susan Rapp, a reading specialist and director of Village Reading Center in Columbia, suggests this easy - and fun - way for parents to begin this learning process.* Help your child find pictures of objects in magazines or newspapers that begin with each of the letters of the alphabet. For example, A for "apple," C for "car." Cut out the picture and paste it on a piece of composition paper or use 5-by-7 index cards.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | February 23, 1993
"The Shot!" reveals the depths of dread that syringes can inspire in the owners of young arms, but 9-year-old author Hailey Elizabeth Glanville says it's not a personal account of her fears.Hailey, a fourth-grader at Mechanicsville Elementary School from Finksburg, said she's not afraid of shots. She hit on the idea for "The Shot!" after suffering a brief bout of writer's block when her class was assigned to write books that would be donated to Carroll County General Hospital's pediatric unit.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | September 12, 1992
Looking for an alphabet book you can count on? A counting book that deserves an A? Here are a few newer ones to check out.* "The Handmade Alphabet," by Laura Rankin (Dial Books, $14, all ages) proves that this genre -- all too often a dumping ground for dull, boring ideas -- can be elevated to an elegant art form.In colored pencil, Ms. Rankin illustrates each letter of the manual alphabet -- a key part of American Sign Language. Each page shows a letter, depicts a hand signing the letter and includes a clue to a word beginning with that letter.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL DAVIS | February 16, 1992
Author and educator Nikia "Niki" Leopold stands before a window in her spacious country kitchen. Surrounded by barn-wood walls upon which hang an extended family of skillets, she grinds fresh coffee beans, brews a pot and pours two steaming mugs.There's time for coffee and conversation on a midwinter Friday afternoon, a pause during another day of writing, sketching and reflecting for one of Baltimore's more multidimensional talents. After receiving her undergraduate degree in art history from Smith College and a master's from Columbia, she studied seven years at Johns Hopkins University for her Ph.D.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham and Molly Dunham,Evening Sun Staff | March 20, 1991
BAD ALPHABET and counting books are easy to come by these days. Because the market for children's books continues to grow despite the recession, some publishers rush to print books of dubious quality. A-B-C and 1-2-3 books are easy to slap together, so choose carefully. If it's a crummy book, kids will get bored.Here are some alphabet and counting books that kids of all ages will open again and again, not because ''they're good for you,'' but because they're good.* ''Alison's Zinnia,'' by Anita Lobel (Greenwillow, $14.95)
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham and Molly Dunham,Evening Sun Staff | November 28, 1990
BEFORE ISABEL Wilner's book, "B Is for Bethlehem," hit the stores in September, her editor at Dutton called to gather background details on the book from Wilner."
FEATURES
September 13, 1998
Did your little one leave for first grade this month? Wipe your tears and visit your local library. These titles should be on his reading list this year."
FEATURES
By Donna Erickson and Donna Erickson,King Features Syndicate | June 4, 1994
If your child's grandparents live far away and you get together only a few times a year, develop an entertaining line of communication with a summer postcard game:Start off by finding a postcard that has a picture of something that begins with the letter "A." Airlines often give away postcards with a picture of an airplane in flight, for example. On the back of the postcard, print the letter "A" at the top and add a short message. Explain that they should in turn send you a postcard with a picture of something that begins with "B."
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