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By ANDREI CODRESCU | April 24, 1995
New Orleans. -- Just published: ''The Adventures of Dr. Alphabet,'' by Dave Morice! The book is subtitled ''104 Unusual Ways to Write Poetry in the Classroom and the Community.'' It is my belief that if Dr. Alphabet's recipes were followed, many of our nation's problems would be solved.Take, for instance, ''the blindfold poem.''In 1977, Dr. Alphabet wrote blindfolded for 10 hours at an art festival in New Hope, Pennsylvania. He became, he tells us, ''more aware of sounds, smells and conversations.
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NEWS
November 7, 2011
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar — another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: ABECEDARIAN Oh, what the writers of the Phoenician and Hebrew languages started when the put aleph next to beth . That gave us the word alphabet , eventually, after they turned into the Greek alpha and beta . And from the shorthand term for the alphabet, the ABCs , we get the splendid word abecedarian (pronounced ay-bee-see-DAR-uh-an)
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FEATURES
By Laura Lippmann | November 3, 1999
Nineteen years ago, Sue Grafton published her first "Alphabet" mystery, "A is for Alibi," introducing female private investigator Kinsey Mill-hone. Now up to No. 15 -- "0 is for Outlaw" (Henry Holt, $26) -- Grafton is visiting Baltimore to discuss the latest in her string of best-selling novels. We decided to tell her story -- and Kinsey's -- from A to Z. (You'll have to follow the clues to find out where and when she will be in Baltimore.)A is for the alphabet. In hindsight, Grafton seems brilliant for picking a thematic device that makes her books not only memorable, but easy to arrange in chronological order.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | October 21, 2010
Player name (Games played) DT Sam Adams (20) FB Obafemi Ayanbadejo (8) DB Robert Bailey (20) QB Tony Banks (14) OL Orlando Bobo (7) OLB Peter Boulware (20) LB O.J. Brigance (20) OLB Cornell Brown (18) DE Rob Burnett (20) TE Ben Coates (20) DT Lional Dalton (20) LB Anthony Davis (18) WR Billy Davis (20) QB Trent Dilfer (13) TE Pedro Edison (0) FB Chuck Evans (5) G/C Mike Flynn (20) OT Spencer Folau (13) FB Sam Gash (19) SS Corey Harris (20)
NEWS
By The article was compiled from reports by Sun correspondents Bill Glauber in Britian, Mark Matthews in Israel, Mark Murphy in South Africa, Will England and Kathy Lally in Russia and Frank Langfitt in China. and The article was compiled from reports by Sun correspondents Bill Glauber in Britian, Mark Matthews in Israel, Mark Murphy in South Africa, Will England and Kathy Lally in Russia and Frank Langfitt in China.,BY THE SUN'S FOREIGN STAFF | December 31, 2000
America is not alone in struggling to teach its children to read. Countries around the world with far fewer resources than the most powerful of them all are also striving to improve literacy. But they face huge difficulties, some that are similar to America's but many that are not. When children start learning to read in Israel, they work with an alphabet that has no vowels. Americans have to learn from a 26-letter alphabet, but in China, children must begin to memorize something like 2,500 characters - and that's just in the early years.
FEATURES
March 1, 1998
Reading starts with recognizing the letters of the alphabet and learning the sounds those letters make. Susan Rapp, a reading specialist and director of Village Reading Center in Columbia, suggests this easy - and fun - way for parents to begin this learning process.* Help your child find pictures of objects in magazines or newspapers that begin with each of the letters of the alphabet. For example, A for "apple," C for "car." Cut out the picture and paste it on a piece of composition paper or use 5-by-7 index cards.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
Editor's note: Jerdine Nolen today writes about reading and writing play materials and their important link to learning. Her column appears biweekly.Children learn about reading and writing in several ways. They watch adults, try out their own ideas, solve problems and figure out for themselves how spoken and written words are connected.Families can help by providing a place where children can read and write and by encouraging them to include reading and writing in their play activities.Here are some suggestions on what to put in that playful learning space:* Table (homemade or purchased, sized for young children)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight | July 20, 2003
Language Visible, Unraveling the Mystery of the Alphabet From A to Z, by David Sacks. Broadway Books, 416 pages, $24.95. Around 1800 B.C., long before it became the symbol of superiority, the letter A was depicted as an ox head. As for B, the roots of its inferiority complex (think B-movie, or plan B) date to some of the earliest alphabets, in which, as it does now, B always came second to A. So begins this delightful journey into the history of our alphabet as told by journalist David Sacks.
NEWS
November 7, 2011
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar — another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: ABECEDARIAN Oh, what the writers of the Phoenician and Hebrew languages started when the put aleph next to beth . That gave us the word alphabet , eventually, after they turned into the Greek alpha and beta . And from the shorthand term for the alphabet, the ABCs , we get the splendid word abecedarian (pronounced ay-bee-see-DAR-uh-an)
FEATURES
By Donna Erickson and Donna Erickson,King Features Syndicate | June 4, 1994
If your child's grandparents live far away and you get together only a few times a year, develop an entertaining line of communication with a summer postcard game:Start off by finding a postcard that has a picture of something that begins with the letter "A." Airlines often give away postcards with a picture of an airplane in flight, for example. On the back of the postcard, print the letter "A" at the top and add a short message. Explain that they should in turn send you a postcard with a picture of something that begins with "B."
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY | September 11, 2009
PLAYER AGE DRAFTED STATS SKINNY FUTURE RHP Jake Arrieta 23 2007, fifth round, Orioles 6-3, 2.59 ERA at Double-A Bowie; 5-8, 3.93 ERA at Triple-A Norfolk The only member of the highly touted "Big Three" who didn't make his big league debut in 2009, he ripped through Double-A before a few rough patches at Norfolk. Likely will start 2010 at Triple-A but could get an in-season promotion. OF Xavier Avery 19 2008, second round, Orioles .262 average, 2 homers, 36 RBIs , 30 steals at Single-A Delmarva Held his own in first full pro season despite age. Could have played running back at the University of Georgia.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,getting.there@baltsun.com | January 5, 2009
Cheryl Sparks, the chief spokeswoman for the Maryland Transportation Authority, fights the same battle day after day after day. Who could blame her for turning to her favorite columnist for a little help? Sparks works for the agency that runs Maryland's toll facilities - the toll portion of Interstate 95, the Baltimore Harbor crossings, the Bay Bridge and a couple of other elderly bridges over the Susquehanna and the Potomac. Alas for her, a big part of Sparks' job description consists of explaining to folks that she doesn't work for the MTA. That acronym belongs to the Maryland Transit Administration, the agency that runs the Baltimore bus system, the light rail, the Metro subway (yes, Baltimore has one)
NEWS
December 31, 2008
A FGHANISTAN - The country, the conflict, the casualties overtook Iraq as the war on everyone's mind this year. With the death toll among Americans rising at an alarming rate and the Taliban forces resurgent, a question keeps repeating: How do we win? B AILOUT - This fall, with America's financial infrastructure crumbling, Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson Jr. persuaded Congress to appropriate $700 billion to help bail out troubled institutions. So far, $350 billion has been invested or lent to more than two dozen banks and financial institutions.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | October 8, 2007
Feeling confused about BRAC? The logistical, financial and political machinations surrounding the national military base realignment and closure process are complicated enough. But throw in the acronym-steeped terminology government officials use and it's enough to make an average citizen's head spin. For example, someone who states that "DBED told CSSC that BRAC will send C4ISR jobs to APG and DISA jobs to FGGM" is sure to leave the listener flummoxed. But not to worry. CSSC - that's the Chesapeake Science and Security Corridor - has published "BRACANYMS," a booklet intended to bring linguistic clarity to BRAC discourse.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2006
The idea for the alphabet garden at St. John's Parish Day School in Ellicott City really began with the meadow that pupils had created three years earlier. The children were upset that sand from the nearby sandbox would escape the playground when it rained and run across a driveway and into the soil of the meadow, damaging the plants that had been growing there. So last year, the second-graders at the private school took action. In science class, they came up with the idea of positioning a screen along the playground fence to hold in the sand.
SPORTS
By ANDY KNOBEL and ANDY KNOBEL,SUN REPORTER | April 2, 2006
Astros. Houston visits the Chicago White Sox on June 23 in a matchup of 2005 World Series participants. Maybe Phil Garner's team will remember its bats this time. Busch. Fans at the St. Louis Cardinals' new park will be able to eat at the Gashouse Grill and Dizzy's Diner. Though with the Arch so close, wouldn't you expect a McDonald's? Clemens. Will Roger return at 43? Or will his last victory go down as that 17-0 masterpiece against South Africa? Damon. Johnny and the New York Yankees visit Fenway Park on May 1. Don't expect to see a lot of those W.W.J.
NEWS
November 24, 2002
Buddy Kaye , 84, a songwriter and lyricist who wrote hits for Perry Como, Frank Sinatra and Barry Manilow, died Thursday in Rancho Mirage, Calif. In a career that spanned six decades, Mr. Kaye published about 400 songs, often collaborating with other songwriters. Mr. Kaye co-wrote "Till the End of Time," a hit for Como in 1945. Another song, "`A' - You're Adorable (The Alphabet Song)," was a No. 1 hit for Mr. Como and the Fontaine Sisters in 1949. Hadda Brooks , 86, the smoky-voiced torch singer and pianist who was known in the 1940s as Queen of the Boogie and who came out of retirement in the late 1980s to find new popularity with younger audiences, died Thursday in Los Angeles, a few weeks after undergoing open-heart surgery.
FEATURES
By Tricia Bishop | February 9, 2000
Leo Lionni's 40-year career as a children's book author and illustrator didn't begin until he was nearly 50, and even then it started only out of desperation. "Little Blue and Little Yellow," Lionni's first children's book, sprang from a ride on a commuter train with his two young grandchildren. Trapped with the rambunctious pair, Lionni quickly improvised a story using torn pieces of colorful pages from Life magazine. The tale captured the duo's attention, and an author evolved. Born in 1910, Lionni worked as an artist, magazine art director and graphic designer before settling into his niche as a writer of children's books with characters created from doodles, (Cornelius the lizard)
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