Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAlpacas
IN THE NEWS

Alpacas

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
After owning and driving school buses for 35 years, Charlene Johns needed a change. A move to a Westminster-area farm offered a less-stressful way of life, but what would she raise? Once she touched the mop-topped, downy creatures at a fair last fall, she was sold. Alpacas. Now she owns 33 and breeds them all. "They're just adorable," said Johns, 53, who had tried to raise a few pigs, goats and steer. "Once you go alpaca, there's nothing else." Johns' two grandsons and other area kids form the Alpaca Posse, which just started training on the farm in mid-April.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
By Barbara and Ken Beem, For The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2012
The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the … wait, those aren't sheep, they're alpacas. And those rangy bovines look an awful lot like bison. And what about those long-legged turkeys running loose in the barnyard? St. Mary's County, site of Maryland's first capital, has long been economically dependent on agriculture, and until a few decades ago, tobacco was king. One look at the farms scattered about the countryside, though, makes it clear that change has taken place. Living green, eating fresh and appreciating local heritage have resulted in a rise in agritourism in this Southern Maryland county, where visitors can experience on a personal level the trials and triumphs of unconventional approaches to farming.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 23, 2000
BETHEL, N.Y. -- Screech. Slam. Ooh. Ahh. Edward F. Boyd and his family scarcely notice the noise anymore. They know the routine so well. First, there is the sudden glow of the brake lights on the vehicles heading past their 120-acre farm on a normally quiet back road in rural Sullivan County. Then comes the whine of the brakes and the thump of car doors slamming. Inevitably, a knot of curious visitors gathers at the pasture fence near the 200-year-old house. "A lot of them take out cameras," said Boyd, "because they've never seen an alpaca before."
EXPLORE
November 17, 2011
The Stoop Storytelling Series will present another installment of live, off-the-cuff slices of life Mon., Nov. 21, 8 p.m. at Centerstage. The show will feature local people from various fields speaking on the subject of relatives for an evening titled "We are Family: Stories about the Ties that Bind. " The show will be preceded by a 7 p.m. cocktail hour featuring live music by Felicia Carter and Amy Shook. Admission is $20. Call 410-332-0033 or go to stoopstorytelling.com. Alpacas everywhere The second annual Alpacas and Fleece Festival will happen Saturday-Sunday, Nov. 19-20, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at the Howard County Fairgrounds (2210 Fairgrounds Road, West Friendship)
TRAVEL
By Barbara and Ken Beem, For The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2012
The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the … wait, those aren't sheep, they're alpacas. And those rangy bovines look an awful lot like bison. And what about those long-legged turkeys running loose in the barnyard? St. Mary's County, site of Maryland's first capital, has long been economically dependent on agriculture, and until a few decades ago, tobacco was king. One look at the farms scattered about the countryside, though, makes it clear that change has taken place. Living green, eating fresh and appreciating local heritage have resulted in a rise in agritourism in this Southern Maryland county, where visitors can experience on a personal level the trials and triumphs of unconventional approaches to farming.
NEWS
By Ben Piven and Ben Piven,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2002
Megan Sherman and Courtney Schmidt playfully snuggled up to their young alpacas, Double Dip and Athena, and meticulously pulled the straw off the animals' soft coats to ensure they were well-groomed. Soon, the Baltimore County girls would help the alpacas maneuver awkwardly around blocks, steps and hay stacks, and jump over hurdles in the horse ring at the Maryland State Fairgrounds. The unusual event, part of yesterday's opening of the county 4-H Fair, gave Megan, Courtney and 13 other youngsters a chance to showcase animals they had cared for since April at Dorsey Farm in Butler.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1996
Every day in northern Baltimore County, Frank Sinatra and Yoda meet for a meal.But it's no Hollywood power lunch -- and the menu usually consists of leafy greens, llama chow and water.Frankie and Yoda are two of the dozens of alpacas living on James and Tilly Dorsey's 160-acre farm in Butler. Bred primarily for their soft and silky fleece, the animals are natives of South America and resemble their larger first cousin, the llama.The Dorseys, who three years ago became the first to own and breed alpacas in Maryland, are working hard to increase awareness about the sweet-faced creatures, which are rare in the United States.
TRAVEL
September 16, 2001
With the leaves gearing up to change colors, it's a good time to plan an outing to mountainous Western Maryland. The Garrett County Chamber of Commerce has put together a list of area farms open for tours, so while you're enjoying the foliage you can learn a thing or two about cultivating shiitake mushrooms and caring for alpacas. Call 301-334-6960 for a brochure, or call the farms below for hours and days of operation: The Learning Farm at Garrett Community College, McHenry; 301-387-3331 -- Guided tours of barns and barnyards as well as demonstrations of farming practices.
EXPLORE
November 17, 2011
The Stoop Storytelling Series will present another installment of live, off-the-cuff slices of life Mon., Nov. 21, 8 p.m. at Centerstage. The show will feature local people from various fields speaking on the subject of relatives for an evening titled "We are Family: Stories about the Ties that Bind. " The show will be preceded by a 7 p.m. cocktail hour featuring live music by Felicia Carter and Amy Shook. Admission is $20. Call 410-332-0033 or go to stoopstorytelling.com. Alpacas everywhere The second annual Alpacas and Fleece Festival will happen Saturday-Sunday, Nov. 19-20, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at the Howard County Fairgrounds (2210 Fairgrounds Road, West Friendship)
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2000
For 103 years, cattle, goats, hogs and sheep have been mainstays at the Carroll County 4-H Fair. This year, they make room for comparatively exotic alpacas and llamas, which make their debut tomorrow as an official animal entry. "I like the way they look - they're like big, fluffy teddy bears," said Jill Janocha, 15, a Westminster High School junior who is showing Benedict, an alpaca she has taught to walk a ramp, duck while stepping under a shelter, step into and out of water and other tasks required of domesticated animals so that farmers can raise them, groom them and shear their fleece.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Sun | August 30, 2009
SALARY: $120,000 AGE: 49 YEARS ON THE JOB: 5 How she got started: : Zia Boccaccio, a native of Cuzco, Peru, easily remembers the first time she became interested in alpacas. She was 6 or 7 when she spotted an alpaca on a trip with her family to ancestral land in the Andes Mountains of Peru. She describes the animal as aloof, delicate and beautiful. When she was 21 years old, she married an American and moved to Washington. For about 12 years, she worked as an operational manager for Steilmann European Selection, a German fashion company.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | March 25, 2007
Irked at being led around the barn on a harness by his owner, Stryker tried to pull away. He stomped his feet in the dirt and lowered his head as if preparing to charge. Yet there was no real cause for alarm - Stryker is a docile animal with no hooves, claws or upper teeth. At worst, the 6-month-old alpaca could be guilty of possessing an occasional mischievous attitude. "Most alpacas aren't like this," said Renee Petersam as Stryker continued the game of tug-of-war. "Stryker is an exception.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
After owning and driving school buses for 35 years, Charlene Johns needed a change. A move to a Westminster-area farm offered a less-stressful way of life, but what would she raise? Once she touched the mop-topped, downy creatures at a fair last fall, she was sold. Alpacas. Now she owns 33 and breeds them all. "They're just adorable," said Johns, 53, who had tried to raise a few pigs, goats and steer. "Once you go alpaca, there's nothing else." Johns' two grandsons and other area kids form the Alpaca Posse, which just started training on the farm in mid-April.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | March 26, 2006
Ben Rosche, a 7-year-old from Upper Marlboro, loves his family's 21 alpacas, especially a white one named Lima. "Whenever we sing ... she makes crazy noises," Ben said yesterday as he played near a group of the exotic South American animals at the 2006 Maryland Alpaca Show and Sale in Reisterstown. "They are nice, they are entertaining." Owners from around the Northeast and from as far as Florida attended the two-day event at Three Ring Farm, where more than 500 alpacas - a record number, according to organizers - were shown and sold.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 25, 2004
DELTA, Pa. - Amid rolling hills here, there lives a hardy herd - descendants of the huacaya and suri alpacas that were once hidden from the Spanish conquistadores in the high Andes by the Incas. The new residents - long-necked creatures - are romping on about 30 acres at a farm called Alpacas of Willow Spring. Nicola Roth and Christopher Neumann own Mr. Scott, Black Jack O'Rourke (BJ) and Chocolate, who are herd sires to the "dams" (female alpacas): Dreamer, Pilgrim, Desiree and a few others.
NEWS
By Ben Piven and Ben Piven,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2002
Megan Sherman and Courtney Schmidt playfully snuggled up to their young alpacas, Double Dip and Athena, and meticulously pulled the straw off the animals' soft coats to ensure they were well-groomed. Soon, the Baltimore County girls would help the alpacas maneuver awkwardly around blocks, steps and hay stacks, and jump over hurdles in the horse ring at the Maryland State Fairgrounds. The unusual event, part of yesterday's opening of the county 4-H Fair, gave Megan, Courtney and 13 other youngsters a chance to showcase animals they had cared for since April at Dorsey Farm in Butler.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Sun | August 30, 2009
SALARY: $120,000 AGE: 49 YEARS ON THE JOB: 5 How she got started: : Zia Boccaccio, a native of Cuzco, Peru, easily remembers the first time she became interested in alpacas. She was 6 or 7 when she spotted an alpaca on a trip with her family to ancestral land in the Andes Mountains of Peru. She describes the animal as aloof, delicate and beautiful. When she was 21 years old, she married an American and moved to Washington. For about 12 years, she worked as an operational manager for Steilmann European Selection, a German fashion company.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | March 26, 2006
Ben Rosche, a 7-year-old from Upper Marlboro, loves his family's 21 alpacas, especially a white one named Lima. "Whenever we sing ... she makes crazy noises," Ben said yesterday as he played near a group of the exotic South American animals at the 2006 Maryland Alpaca Show and Sale in Reisterstown. "They are nice, they are entertaining." Owners from around the Northeast and from as far as Florida attended the two-day event at Three Ring Farm, where more than 500 alpacas - a record number, according to organizers - were shown and sold.
TRAVEL
September 16, 2001
With the leaves gearing up to change colors, it's a good time to plan an outing to mountainous Western Maryland. The Garrett County Chamber of Commerce has put together a list of area farms open for tours, so while you're enjoying the foliage you can learn a thing or two about cultivating shiitake mushrooms and caring for alpacas. Call 301-334-6960 for a brochure, or call the farms below for hours and days of operation: The Learning Farm at Garrett Community College, McHenry; 301-387-3331 -- Guided tours of barns and barnyards as well as demonstrations of farming practices.
NEWS
By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 23, 2000
BETHEL, N.Y. -- Screech. Slam. Ooh. Ahh. Edward F. Boyd and his family scarcely notice the noise anymore. They know the routine so well. First, there is the sudden glow of the brake lights on the vehicles heading past their 120-acre farm on a normally quiet back road in rural Sullivan County. Then comes the whine of the brakes and the thump of car doors slamming. Inevitably, a knot of curious visitors gathers at the pasture fence near the 200-year-old house. "A lot of them take out cameras," said Boyd, "because they've never seen an alpaca before."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.