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By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2000
A 62-year-old physician pleaded guilty to federal charges yesterday in a scheme that convinced dying people that a highly experimental, unapproved drug could save their lives. Donald L. MacNay, who helped treat hundreds of people across the country with a drug derived from aloe vera extract, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to mail fraud and conspiracy to produce an unapproved drug. "They used the Internet, they used mass mailings, they used radio broadcasts in order to tout the virtues of aloe vera for terminally ill patients," said Assistant U.S. Attorney Virginia B. Evans.
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By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 31, 2008
Beyond its topical use, the outer part of the aloe leaf (the green part, or rind, of the leaf) produces a juice or dried substance called latex, which contains compounds that make for a natural laxative. Products made with various components of aloe used to be regulated by the Food and Drug Administration as oral over-the-counter laxatives. In 2002, however, the FDA required these products be removed from the market or reformulated because of insufficient safety information from manufacturers.
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NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2001
A Finksburg man who authorities say treated more than 3,000 critically ill patients with an aloe vera concoction was sentenced yesterday to 46 months in federal prison, one year of supervised probation and ordered to pay $222,506 in restitution. U.S. District Judge William M. Nickerson also ordered Allen J. Hoffman, 55, to refrain from the sale, distribution or marketing of aloe vera or cesium chloride as a treatment for cancer and other diseases and not to engage in any activity involving the treatment of patients.
NEWS
By Beth Botts and Beth Botts,Chicago Tribune | May 9, 2004
As you gather plants for the patio pots, think beyond begonias and geraniums and consider the sculptural possibilities of cacti and succulents. They not only will bring interest to your outdoor plantings, but they are also tough survivors next winter in the bone-dry climate of a centrally heated home. Succulents and cacti are desert plants that thrive in dry air. But they also can tolerate temperature extremes, such as the sunny, hot days and cool nights of a winter windowsill. And if you if go away for a few days, they won't die from lack of water.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2000
A Baltimore company accused of selling sick and dying people an untested and possibly dangerous aloe vera treatment must pay a $3.7 million fine and repay its customers, the head of the state Consumer Protection Division has ruled. Under the ruling announced yesterday by state Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., the company, T-UP Inc., also must stop claiming that its product can treat or cure diseases such as cancer, AIDS or herpes. The decision by the state consumer protection chief, William Leibovici, comes in the middle of a federal criminal trial against T-UP's president, Allen J. Hoffman.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1999
For a terminally ill cancer patient, the audio tape had an appealing title: "There is Hope. You Do Not Have to Die."But U.S. postal inspectors say the message illegally misled dying people into paying $12,000 for an unapproved drug. A Baltimore businessman and a Virginia doctor were indicted yesterday in connection with a scheme that prosecutors described as deplorable."They raised the hopes of cancer patients, and that is insidious," said Lynne A. Battaglia, the U.S. attorney for Maryland.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2000
One of the country's largest criminal cases targeting alternative medicine ended yesterday with jurors deadlocked over charges that a Baltimore businessman fraudulently sold people aloe vera as a treatment for cancer and AIDS. In another setback to federal prosecutors, the jury acquitted a second defendant, the Oklahoma man whose company grew and processed the aloe vera used in the treatment and who also faced fraud charges. After deliberating nearly 30 hours over six days, the jury reached a unanimous verdict on only one of the charges in the 20-count indictment against Allen J. Hoffman and his Baltimore-based company, T-UP Inc. The jury found Hoffman not guilty on one count of mail fraud.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2000
Heading into the windowless room for deliberations, foreman Mark Bartholomew expected little trouble reaching a verdict. After all, if ever 12 people thrown together for jury duty seemed to get along, this was the group. In the 11 weeks spent together for the case of the United States vs. Allen J. Hoffman, they had traded stories about kids and spouses. A boast about chili recipes had turned Tuesday lunches into elaborate pot-luck meals. There were plans for a reunion and a group photo to mark the unlikely friendships forged in the jury box of Courtroom 3C in Baltimore's federal courthouse.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2000
In one of the nation's largest criminal cases involving alternative medicine, a federal prosecutor said yesterday that a Baltimore businessman duped hundreds of dying people into buying "a miracle treatment" that amounted to a large-scale fraud. "This case is about how far a salesman will go in his sales pitch to sell his drug to the American public," said Assistant U.S. Attorney Virginia B. Evans in yesterday's opening statements. "It was a business designed to relieve cancer patients of their pocketbooks, not their suffering."
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 31, 2008
Beyond its topical use, the outer part of the aloe leaf (the green part, or rind, of the leaf) produces a juice or dried substance called latex, which contains compounds that make for a natural laxative. Products made with various components of aloe used to be regulated by the Food and Drug Administration as oral over-the-counter laxatives. In 2002, however, the FDA required these products be removed from the market or reformulated because of insufficient safety information from manufacturers.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2004
Medical gloves have come a long way since the 18th century, when they were made from the intestines of sheep - and only partially covered the doctor's hand. Today, they're carrying out high-tech germ warfare. Although they look, feel and even smell like ordinary medical gloves, a new design that could be on the U.S. market by the end of the year emits a gas that's safe to humans but deadly to everything from HIV to E. coli. All the new glove needs to start working is a little ambient light.
NEWS
By Halle Gaut and By Halle Gaut,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 21, 2002
Your beat-up purse mirror that you bought years ago at the drugstore as a simple aid for applying lipstick in the car is about to have some fancy competition. Smythson's of Bond Street, an English company known primarily for its fine stationery and leather goods, is introducing its version of a compact mirror. It's actually two round mirrors of varying magnifications in colored pigskin leather. Besides being easy to hold, it folds into a stand -- freeing hands for easier viewing and make-up application.
NEWS
By From staff reports | April 11, 2002
In Maryland $3.7 million fine upheld in aloe vera case ANNAPOLIS - The Court of Special Appeals has upheld a $3.7 million fine against a Baltimore company that sold aloe vera and the mineral cesium chloride as cures for AIDS and cancer. T-Up Inc. and its principals, Allen J. Hoffman and Neal Deoul, were found by an administrative law judge and a Baltimore County Circuit judge to have violated the state's consumer protection laws with false advertising. The fine, originally levied by the administrative law judge, was upheld this week by the state's second highest court.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2001
A Finksburg man who authorities say treated more than 3,000 critically ill patients with an aloe vera concoction was sentenced yesterday to 46 months in federal prison, one year of supervised probation and ordered to pay $222,506 in restitution. U.S. District Judge William M. Nickerson also ordered Allen J. Hoffman, 55, to refrain from the sale, distribution or marketing of aloe vera or cesium chloride as a treatment for cancer and other diseases and not to engage in any activity involving the treatment of patients.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2001
In one of the few criminal cases involving alternative medicine, a businessman in Baltimore who treated critically ill patients with an aloe vera concoction pleaded guilty in federal court yesterday to two counts of distributing an unapproved drug with intent to defraud the public. Allen J. Hoffman, 54, of Finksburg treated more than 3,000 people during the late 1990s and could be sentenced to up to six years in prison and more than $500,000 in fines, and restitution to his patients or their families under the plea agreement.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2000
A Baltimore businessman awaiting retrial in a major alternative-medicine case was told this week that he could no longer work in the Bahamas, where he has continued administering controversial aloe vera treatments to critically ill customers. Allen J. Hoffman returned to the United States yesterday after Bahamian authorities notified him Sunday his permit to work at a natural health clinic in Freeport was revoked, said Lambert Campbell, deputy director of immigration for the Bahamas. The clinic's head, Kevin C. King, said in an interview he cut his ties to Hoffman after learning more about the federal charges against him in Maryland and discovering that Hoffman was not a medical doctor, as King said Hoffman had represented.
NEWS
By From staff reports | April 11, 2002
In Maryland $3.7 million fine upheld in aloe vera case ANNAPOLIS - The Court of Special Appeals has upheld a $3.7 million fine against a Baltimore company that sold aloe vera and the mineral cesium chloride as cures for AIDS and cancer. T-Up Inc. and its principals, Allen J. Hoffman and Neal Deoul, were found by an administrative law judge and a Baltimore County Circuit judge to have violated the state's consumer protection laws with false advertising. The fine, originally levied by the administrative law judge, was upheld this week by the state's second highest court.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2000
A Baltimore businessman awaiting retrial in a major alternative-medicine case was told this week that he could no longer work in the Bahamas, where he has continued administering controversial aloe vera treatments to critically ill customers. Allen J. Hoffman returned to the United States yesterday after Bahamian authorities notified him Sunday his permit to work at a natural health clinic in Freeport was revoked, said Lambert Campbell, deputy director of immigration for the Bahamas. The clinic's head, Kevin C. King, said in an interview he cut his ties to Hoffman after learning more about the federal charges against him in Maryland and discovering that Hoffman was not a medical doctor, as King said Hoffman had represented.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2000
Heading into the windowless room for deliberations, foreman Mark Bartholomew expected little trouble reaching a verdict. After all, if ever 12 people thrown together for jury duty seemed to get along, this was the group. In the 11 weeks spent together for the case of the United States vs. Allen J. Hoffman, they had traded stories about kids and spouses. A boast about chili recipes had turned Tuesday lunches into elaborate pot-luck meals. There were plans for a reunion and a group photo to mark the unlikely friendships forged in the jury box of Courtroom 3C in Baltimore's federal courthouse.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2000
One of the country's largest criminal cases targeting alternative medicine ended yesterday with jurors deadlocked over charges that a Baltimore businessman fraudulently sold people aloe vera as a treatment for cancer and AIDS. In another setback to federal prosecutors, the jury acquitted a second defendant, the Oklahoma man whose company grew and processed the aloe vera used in the treatment and who also faced fraud charges. After deliberating nearly 30 hours over six days, the jury reached a unanimous verdict on only one of the charges in the 20-count indictment against Allen J. Hoffman and his Baltimore-based company, T-UP Inc. The jury found Hoffman not guilty on one count of mail fraud.
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