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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2000
Federal prosecutors are seeking a court order to stop a Baltimore businessman from continuing to sell aloe vera treatments to critically ill customers, pending his retrial in a major alternative-medicine case. Among the reasons listed in court papers, investigators said that a California woman died Sept. 3 after receiving intravenous aloe vera injections for her cancer and that other patients also have continued receiving the untested and possibly dangerous treatment. The woman paid Allen J. Hoffman $15,000 for the treatment, which he administered to her in the Bahamas, court papers say. Prosecutors are asking a federal judge to issue an injunction blocking Hoffman and his business, Astec Biologics Inc., from selling or shipping the aloe products.
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SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 26, 2009
9:30 p.m. [MLB Network] The series featuring major league ballparks tours Camden Yards. Not likely to be included: the storage cabinet in which the club kept extra aloe lotion when Marty Cordova was on the Orioles.
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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2000
Federal prosecutors questioned the credentials of Baltimore businessman Allen J. Hoffman yesterday, saying the man who marketed aloe vera as a treatment for everything from cancer to AIDS never earned a grade higher than a C in college science classes and his honorary doctorate degree was a fake. Hoffman, on trial in U.S. District Court on fraud charges related to his aloe business, has testified that he paid $500 to receive a doctor of philosophy degree from the University of Heidelberg.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 31, 2008
Beyond its topical use, the outer part of the aloe leaf (the green part, or rind, of the leaf) produces a juice or dried substance called latex, which contains compounds that make for a natural laxative. Products made with various components of aloe used to be regulated by the Food and Drug Administration as oral over-the-counter laxatives. In 2002, however, the FDA required these products be removed from the market or reformulated because of insufficient safety information from manufacturers.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2001
The operators of a Baltimore company accused of selling an untested aloe vera treatment to critically ill people have asked a Baltimore County Circuit Court judge to nullify a $3.7 million state fine imposed in May as part of an administrative order to close up shop. Lawyers for Allen J. Hoffman, president of T-UP Inc., and his financing partner, Neal Deoul, argued Friday that they were denied a fair hearing before the state Consumer Affairs Division ordered them to close May 5. The order, based on Administrative Law Judge Judith Jacobson's findings, requires Hoffman and Deoul to stop claiming their aloe treatments cure diseases and to pay $1,000 fines for each of the 3,706 people who purchased the treatments from 1996 to 1998.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,Special to The Sun | July 31, 2008
With her smooth, glowing complexion, Lynne Bonner Redd looks younger than her 46 years. Ask her secret, and she'll tell you it's not a nip or tuck. It's simply aloe. "Aloe is part of my overall health and beauty philosophy," says the Pikesville resident, who typically keeps an aloe plant handy for cuts and mild burns. She also purchases packaged aloe products at stores such as Whole Foods Market. "I buy aloe liquid by the gallon, keep it in the fridge and drink a few ounces cold. It tastes like fizzy water," she says.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2000
After two months of testimony, a federal jury now must settle the central question in the fraud case against Allen J. Hoffman: Did the Baltimore businessman believe in the aloe vera treatment he sold across the country, or was he little more than a new-age snake-oil salesman, preying on the sick and dyings' desperate search for a cure? In closing arguments yesterday, Hoffman's attorney said the former lab technician was convinced that his alternative treatment offered real hope to people diagnosed with everything from cancer to AIDS.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 26, 2009
9:30 p.m. [MLB Network] The series featuring major league ballparks tours Camden Yards. Not likely to be included: the storage cabinet in which the club kept extra aloe lotion when Marty Cordova was on the Orioles.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2000
Allen J. Hoffman rattles off medical terms with confidence of a doctor, which is exactly what he was called by many of the people who sought the Baltimore businessman's aloe vera treatment for everything from AIDS to cancer. Hoffman's credentials consist of a high school equivalency diploma and an associate's degree from Baltimore City Community College. His other degree is a doctorate in philosophy, which he describes as an honorary diploma from a German university, although he paid a fee for it. His lack of medical credentials did not restrain Hoffman from promoting an aloe vera product he developed as a potentially life-saving treatment.
FEATURES
By Paula Begoun and Paula Begoun,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | March 17, 1994
Q: Do you know anything about BioMedics cosmetics? They are distributed by plastic surgeons. I am also curious about Zia Wesley's (she also writes beauty books) recommendation to use her Sea Tonic with Aloe Toner. She also recommends wiping diluted aloe vera gel over blemishes to help heal them. I have extremely sensitive skin and am allergic to everything I try.A: I am unfamiliar with BioMedics products, but the pictures in the brochure you sent are for a facial peel (either AHA or some other acid peel)
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,Special to The Sun | July 31, 2008
With her smooth, glowing complexion, Lynne Bonner Redd looks younger than her 46 years. Ask her secret, and she'll tell you it's not a nip or tuck. It's simply aloe. "Aloe is part of my overall health and beauty philosophy," says the Pikesville resident, who typically keeps an aloe plant handy for cuts and mild burns. She also purchases packaged aloe products at stores such as Whole Foods Market. "I buy aloe liquid by the gallon, keep it in the fridge and drink a few ounces cold. It tastes like fizzy water," she says.
NEWS
April 20, 2006
On April 16, 2006, DAWN K. Friends may call at the CHATMAN- HARRIS FUNERAL HOME, 5240 Reisterstown Road, Friday after 12 noon - 8 P.M. The family will receive friends at the above chapel Saturday 10 A.M. Funeral Services will begin 10:30 A.M. Interment Mt. Zion Cemetery.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2001
A Finksburg man who authorities say treated more than 3,000 critically ill patients with an aloe vera concoction was sentenced yesterday to 46 months in federal prison, one year of supervised probation and ordered to pay $222,506 in restitution. U.S. District Judge William M. Nickerson also ordered Allen J. Hoffman, 55, to refrain from the sale, distribution or marketing of aloe vera or cesium chloride as a treatment for cancer and other diseases and not to engage in any activity involving the treatment of patients.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2001
In one of the few criminal cases involving alternative medicine, a businessman in Baltimore who treated critically ill patients with an aloe vera concoction pleaded guilty in federal court yesterday to two counts of distributing an unapproved drug with intent to defraud the public. Allen J. Hoffman, 54, of Finksburg treated more than 3,000 people during the late 1990s and could be sentenced to up to six years in prison and more than $500,000 in fines, and restitution to his patients or their families under the plea agreement.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 9, 2001
In Baltimore County Judge upholds fine for company that sold aloe vera treatment TOWSON - A Baltimore County Circuit Court judge has affirmed an administrative decision to impose a $3.7 million fine on a Baltimore County company that sold an untested aloe vera treatment to critically ill people. Lawyers for Allen J. Hoffman, president of T-Up Inc., and his financing partner, Neal Deoul, argued that they were denied a fair hearing after the state Consumer Affairs Division issued the fine and ordered them to close May 5. But Judge J. William Hinkel ruled this week that there was substantial evidence to support the agency's decision.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2001
The operators of a Baltimore company accused of selling an untested aloe vera treatment to critically ill people have asked a Baltimore County Circuit Court judge to nullify a $3.7 million state fine imposed in May as part of an administrative order to close up shop. Lawyers for Allen J. Hoffman, president of T-UP Inc., and his financing partner, Neal Deoul, argued Friday that they were denied a fair hearing before the state Consumer Affairs Division ordered them to close May 5. The order, based on Administrative Law Judge Judith Jacobson's findings, requires Hoffman and Deoul to stop claiming their aloe treatments cure diseases and to pay $1,000 fines for each of the 3,706 people who purchased the treatments from 1996 to 1998.
FEATURES
By Paula Begoun and Paula Begoun,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | May 12, 1994
Many companies proudly boast that they do not test their products on animals.However, it isn't often clear whether or not the products contain animal ingredients or whether the ingredients individually were ever tested on animals.Some companies, including The Body Shop, have a self-imposed five-year "grandfather clause," which means that they will use ingredients previously tested on animals as long as the testing took place five years prior to the date the raw ingredient was purchased.Beauty Without Cruelty is one of the few companies with a strict, rigorously defined position concerning animal testing.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 9, 2001
In Baltimore County Judge upholds fine for company that sold aloe vera treatment TOWSON - A Baltimore County Circuit Court judge has affirmed an administrative decision to impose a $3.7 million fine on a Baltimore County company that sold an untested aloe vera treatment to critically ill people. Lawyers for Allen J. Hoffman, president of T-Up Inc., and his financing partner, Neal Deoul, argued that they were denied a fair hearing after the state Consumer Affairs Division issued the fine and ordered them to close May 5. But Judge J. William Hinkel ruled this week that there was substantial evidence to support the agency's decision.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2000
Federal prosecutors are seeking a court order to stop a Baltimore businessman from continuing to sell aloe vera treatments to critically ill customers, pending his retrial in a major alternative-medicine case. Among the reasons listed in court papers, investigators said that a California woman died Sept. 3 after receiving intravenous aloe vera injections for her cancer and that other patients also have continued receiving the untested and possibly dangerous treatment. The woman paid Allen J. Hoffman $15,000 for the treatment, which he administered to her in the Bahamas, court papers say. Prosecutors are asking a federal judge to issue an injunction blocking Hoffman and his business, Astec Biologics Inc., from selling or shipping the aloe products.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2000
Heading into the windowless room for deliberations, foreman Mark Bartholomew expected little trouble reaching a verdict. After all, if ever 12 people thrown together for jury duty seemed to get along, this was the group. In the 11 weeks spent together for the case of the United States vs. Allen J. Hoffman, they had traded stories about kids and spouses. A boast about chili recipes had turned Tuesday lunches into elaborate pot-luck meals. There were plans for a reunion and a group photo to mark the unlikely friendships forged in the jury box of Courtroom 3C in Baltimore's federal courthouse.
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