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By NICK MALGIERI and NICK MALGIERI,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 8, 2006
The sweetness of almond paste perfumes the air in Sicily. This is understandable because almond paste is an essential ingredient in so many of the cakes, cookies and confections that make Sicilian baking the most elaborate and interesting in all of Italy. And not just at Easter. The nut pastes, refined sugar and candied fruit, for which the island is so famous, were bequeathed by the Saracen Arabs who ruled the island for more than two centuries, beginning in the early 800s. And when the preparation of elaborate sweets moved out of the palaces, it crept into, of all places, the convents of cloistered nuns, who adopted the baking and selling of all sorts of sweets as means to support their communities.
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By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
Elizabeth Skenderovic from Dundalk was looking for a recipe she misplaced for making an almond cake using almond paste. Kay Berney from Baltimore shared a recipe for what she calls marzipan cake that is made with almond paste. She said she has been making this cake for many years, and it was a favorite of her late husband and her father, who both loved the taste of marzipan. Both marzipan and almond paste are made with ground almonds and sugar, but in different proportions and with different uses.
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By Laura Rottenberg | November 7, 1996
Back in my college days, a final exam-addled dorm mate conducted a poll just before the holidays. The choices were "love fruitcake" and "hate fruitcake." Responses on both sides of the issue were staggeringly vehement, and if I remember correctly, far more than half of those polled seemed unequivocally opposed, although I can't promise there wasn't a little ballot stuffing.We could take the same poll with marzipan. But with this almond-paste confection, in addition to "love it" and "hate it," we'd have to add the third category of "never heard of it."
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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | July 26, 2008
Recently during a weekend visit with good friends, I sampled a fabulous apricot tart. I was intrigued by the description of the recipe. It was not the typical fruit tart baked in a pan with removable sides, but rather a rustic version. My creative friend added an unexpected ingredient: almond paste. I couldn't wait to sample this sweet confection, and after the first bite, I knew it was a winner. Betty Rosbottom writes for Tribune Media Services. EMILY'S RUSTIC APRICOT TART Serves 6 to 8 Crust: 1 cup flour 5 tablespoons yellow cornmeal plus extra for the baking sheet 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 stick (4 ounces)
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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | July 26, 2008
Recently during a weekend visit with good friends, I sampled a fabulous apricot tart. I was intrigued by the description of the recipe. It was not the typical fruit tart baked in a pan with removable sides, but rather a rustic version. My creative friend added an unexpected ingredient: almond paste. I couldn't wait to sample this sweet confection, and after the first bite, I knew it was a winner. Betty Rosbottom writes for Tribune Media Services. EMILY'S RUSTIC APRICOT TART Serves 6 to 8 Crust: 1 cup flour 5 tablespoons yellow cornmeal plus extra for the baking sheet 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 stick (4 ounces)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
Elizabeth Skenderovic from Dundalk was looking for a recipe she misplaced for making an almond cake using almond paste. Kay Berney from Baltimore shared a recipe for what she calls marzipan cake that is made with almond paste. She said she has been making this cake for many years, and it was a favorite of her late husband and her father, who both loved the taste of marzipan. Both marzipan and almond paste are made with ground almonds and sugar, but in different proportions and with different uses.
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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | January 4, 1995
Crab soup anyone? Michele Johnston of Dundalk would like some so she requested a "cream of crab soup recipe. I love this soup along with everyone in my family. Does anyone have a recipe?" she wrote.And, a peach tart? Barbara L. Sanico of Baltimore requested a recipe for Peach Frangipani Tart."I believe it is made with fresh peaches, almond paste, apricot glaze and a nutty crust," she wrote.The soup recipe of choice was sent in by Betsy Hedeman of Relay who wrote that her recipe was "not cheap to make but is rich, not thick with flour, but ever so elegant to taste."
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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | September 29, 1999
Marianne Lebre of Bend, Ore., was looking for a recipe for a large cookie called Almond Horns, which she used to get at an Italian bakery in Philadelphia. She said they are shaped like a horseshoe, and the ends are dipped in dark chocolate. "They are our favorite," she wrote. "I would love to make them."Marilyn Jankowski of Bel Air responded with a recipe for Chocolate-Dipped Almond Horns from "Favorite Brand Name Recipes" (October 1991), a booklet she found at a store checkout counter.Edwin S. Krell of Glen Burnie remembers the fried dough his mother used to make.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | June 27, 1995
PELLA, Iowa -- This is the town that pastry built.Actually it was built by Dutch settlers, and today it is sustained by a famous window-maker, but pastry is what makes Pella different from Prairie Meadows and Prairie City and a hundred other remote crossroads that are sprinkled across rural Iowa like confectioners' sugar.You can walk into Jaarsma's Bakery and commit a caloric catastrophe by picking out a few doughnuts (glazed, sugared, cinnamon and jelly) or creating an assortment of strudel (cream cheese, apricot-almond, raspberry or blueberry)
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By ROHINA PHADNIS | February 11, 2006
What it is -- A mix with accessories and instructions for making the traditional Mardi Gras cake. What we like about it --This cake enlivens your Fat Tuesday table while helping New Orleans, the city it symbolizes. King Arthur Flour will donate $2 to the Salvation Army's hurricane-relief effort for every cake kit sold before Feb. 28. The kit includes instructions, cake mix, almond paste, sugar glaze and yellow, green and purple decorating sugars. What it costs --$18.95; $17.95 each for two or more.
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By NICK MALGIERI and NICK MALGIERI,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 8, 2006
The sweetness of almond paste perfumes the air in Sicily. This is understandable because almond paste is an essential ingredient in so many of the cakes, cookies and confections that make Sicilian baking the most elaborate and interesting in all of Italy. And not just at Easter. The nut pastes, refined sugar and candied fruit, for which the island is so famous, were bequeathed by the Saracen Arabs who ruled the island for more than two centuries, beginning in the early 800s. And when the preparation of elaborate sweets moved out of the palaces, it crept into, of all places, the convents of cloistered nuns, who adopted the baking and selling of all sorts of sweets as means to support their communities.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | September 29, 1999
Marianne Lebre of Bend, Ore., was looking for a recipe for a large cookie called Almond Horns, which she used to get at an Italian bakery in Philadelphia. She said they are shaped like a horseshoe, and the ends are dipped in dark chocolate. "They are our favorite," she wrote. "I would love to make them."Marilyn Jankowski of Bel Air responded with a recipe for Chocolate-Dipped Almond Horns from "Favorite Brand Name Recipes" (October 1991), a booklet she found at a store checkout counter.Edwin S. Krell of Glen Burnie remembers the fried dough his mother used to make.
NEWS
By Laura Rottenberg | November 7, 1996
Back in my college days, a final exam-addled dorm mate conducted a poll just before the holidays. The choices were "love fruitcake" and "hate fruitcake." Responses on both sides of the issue were staggeringly vehement, and if I remember correctly, far more than half of those polled seemed unequivocally opposed, although I can't promise there wasn't a little ballot stuffing.We could take the same poll with marzipan. But with this almond-paste confection, in addition to "love it" and "hate it," we'd have to add the third category of "never heard of it."
NEWS
By Boston Globe | June 27, 1995
PELLA, Iowa -- This is the town that pastry built.Actually it was built by Dutch settlers, and today it is sustained by a famous window-maker, but pastry is what makes Pella different from Prairie Meadows and Prairie City and a hundred other remote crossroads that are sprinkled across rural Iowa like confectioners' sugar.You can walk into Jaarsma's Bakery and commit a caloric catastrophe by picking out a few doughnuts (glazed, sugared, cinnamon and jelly) or creating an assortment of strudel (cream cheese, apricot-almond, raspberry or blueberry)
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | January 4, 1995
Crab soup anyone? Michele Johnston of Dundalk would like some so she requested a "cream of crab soup recipe. I love this soup along with everyone in my family. Does anyone have a recipe?" she wrote.And, a peach tart? Barbara L. Sanico of Baltimore requested a recipe for Peach Frangipani Tart."I believe it is made with fresh peaches, almond paste, apricot glaze and a nutty crust," she wrote.The soup recipe of choice was sent in by Betsy Hedeman of Relay who wrote that her recipe was "not cheap to make but is rich, not thick with flour, but ever so elegant to taste."
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom | August 22, 1993
A quick way to make a delicious plum tart: Puff pastry is rolled and shaped into a free-standing pastry shell, then filled with a mixture of almond paste, eggs, lemon juice and zest, and flour. The tart is topped with plum wedges and baked until the crust is golden brown.Plum-almond tartMakes 6 to 8 servings1 (about 9 3/4 -by-9-inch) sheet frozen puff pastry, defrosted (see note)1/4 cup unsalted butter, softened1/2 cup (4 ounces) almond paste, broken into chunks1 tablespoon granulated sugar1 tablespoon grated lemon zest (grated color portion of rind)
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