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NEWS
August 8, 1998
On Feb. 12, 1983, the mid-Atlantic states were hit with a bruising winter storm. Some areas were covered with more than 30 inches of snow. For Bill O'Toole, prognosticator for The Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack, it was his finest day. He had predicted the storm, to the day, the previous summer.A decade later, he received attention from media all over the country for predicting the fierce winter storms of 1993-1994. His predictions for the winter of 1998-1999:92 cold days, 59 wet days, 16 cyclonic storms (which last three days)
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NEWS
December 3, 2006
For hire: weather prognosticator; fuzzy and cuddly; good at mulching leaves and curling into a ball; available in autumn only; has a tendency to become flighty; for references, contact Punxsutawney Phil. The woolly bear is neither wool nor bear. It is a caterpillar that begins life as a tiny egg and departs this world as a yellow-brown Tiger Moth. In between, it wears a mink-like coat, ambles about in search of patches of sunlight and, according to American folklore, forecasts the coming winter meteorology with variances in the width of its distinctive black and orange bands.
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NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1998
ARLINGTON, Vt. -- Extensive medical examinations were conducted, specialists were consulted, and the news from the doctors was not good: Charles Fisher, well into his 70s, needed a stomach operation.Fisher had faith in modern medicine, but he also had more consulting to do before consenting to the knife. It was important, he told his doctors, to schedule the operation on a day when the moon was concentrating on his head or feet -- and certainly not on his stomach.And to determine just when that might be, Fisher did what thousands of people have done for a couple of centuries now. He consulted his Hagers-Town Almanack.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2000
It's a great year for woolly bear caterpillars, says Frank Leiter. As the chief judge of the Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack's annual woolly bear contest, he ought to know. The Almanack, renowned for a century for its annual weather predictions, lunar charts and aphorisms, has been running a contest for 18 years, offering $100 prizes for the cutest and the biggest of the fuzzy black-and-brown critters; runners-up receive six copies of the venerable publication. Only days into the month-long contest, Leiter had more than 20 entries - sent by schoolchildren throughout Washington County - stored in little plastic cups at his home outside Hagerstown.
NEWS
By CINDY PARR | January 23, 1995
I certainly have enjoyed the unseasonal weather we have been experiencing over the past couple of weeks.It beats the snow and ice we had one year ago.Like many people, I have a need to know what the weather has in store for me on any given day.Weather forecasts are offered with the nightly news.But being a native of Washington County, I have a tendency to follow weather predictions presented by the "Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack."Throughout its history of 198 years, the publication has given a fairly accurate account of weather in the Mid-Atlantic region.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1995
HAGERSTOWN -- Get out your woollies. Those well-known hairy weather foretellers -- the woolly bears -- are predicting a colder and wetter than normal winter. At least through mid-January.That prognostication comes from analysis of 384 of the black-and-reddish brown caterpillars collected last month in the venerable Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack's annual Woolly Bear Contest.The 199-year-old Almanack -- which accurately predicted the cold, snowy, icy winter of 1993-1994 -- forecasts a cold winter.
NEWS
December 3, 2006
For hire: weather prognosticator; fuzzy and cuddly; good at mulching leaves and curling into a ball; available in autumn only; has a tendency to become flighty; for references, contact Punxsutawney Phil. The woolly bear is neither wool nor bear. It is a caterpillar that begins life as a tiny egg and departs this world as a yellow-brown Tiger Moth. In between, it wears a mink-like coat, ambles about in search of patches of sunlight and, according to American folklore, forecasts the coming winter meteorology with variances in the width of its distinctive black and orange bands.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,Sun Staff | February 6, 2000
We can't say we weren't warned. Sure, the National Weather Service neglected to mention that a major blizzard was heading our way last month, robbing us of the chance to race to the supermarket and fight for the last jar of peanut butter. But at least one person knew what was coming, even if the big forecasters' high-tech computers failed them. A man who studies lunar phases, sunspots and ocean currents accurately predicted the surprise storm of 2000. And he knew it four months ago. William O'Toole, for 30 years the weather prognosticator for the annual Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack, talks about beating the big guys and -- brrrrr!
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2000
It's a great year for woolly bear caterpillars, says Frank Leiter. As the chief judge of the Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack's annual woolly bear contest, he ought to know. The Almanack, renowned for a century for its annual weather predictions, lunar charts and aphorisms, has been running a contest for 18 years, offering $100 prizes for the cutest and the biggest of the fuzzy black-and-brown critters; runners-up receive six copies of the venerable publication. Only days into the month-long contest, Leiter had more than 20 entries - sent by schoolchildren throughout Washington County - stored in little plastic cups at his home outside Hagerstown.
NEWS
By Julius Westheimer | October 22, 1998
IN a couple of days, The Sun will print a box that will read, in effect, "Eastern Standard Time returns at 2 a.m. Sunday, giving us back that hour of sleep we lost last spring."Who wants that extra hour of sleep? As Benjamin Franklin wrote in "Poor Richard's Almanack" (1758), "There will be sleeping enough in the grave."I'd like that extra hour to: Feed more hungry people at Our Daily Bread soup kitchen; watch Cal Ripken Jr. fire from deep third base to nip the batter; see my seventh total solar eclipse; hear Victor Borge read "Inflationary Language" at the Meyerhoff and attend a Kabuki performance at the Kennedy Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,Sun Staff | February 6, 2000
We can't say we weren't warned. Sure, the National Weather Service neglected to mention that a major blizzard was heading our way last month, robbing us of the chance to race to the supermarket and fight for the last jar of peanut butter. But at least one person knew what was coming, even if the big forecasters' high-tech computers failed them. A man who studies lunar phases, sunspots and ocean currents accurately predicted the surprise storm of 2000. And he knew it four months ago. William O'Toole, for 30 years the weather prognosticator for the annual Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack, talks about beating the big guys and -- brrrrr!
NEWS
By Julius Westheimer | October 22, 1998
IN a couple of days, The Sun will print a box that will read, in effect, "Eastern Standard Time returns at 2 a.m. Sunday, giving us back that hour of sleep we lost last spring."Who wants that extra hour of sleep? As Benjamin Franklin wrote in "Poor Richard's Almanack" (1758), "There will be sleeping enough in the grave."I'd like that extra hour to: Feed more hungry people at Our Daily Bread soup kitchen; watch Cal Ripken Jr. fire from deep third base to nip the batter; see my seventh total solar eclipse; hear Victor Borge read "Inflationary Language" at the Meyerhoff and attend a Kabuki performance at the Kennedy Center.
NEWS
August 8, 1998
On Feb. 12, 1983, the mid-Atlantic states were hit with a bruising winter storm. Some areas were covered with more than 30 inches of snow. For Bill O'Toole, prognosticator for The Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack, it was his finest day. He had predicted the storm, to the day, the previous summer.A decade later, he received attention from media all over the country for predicting the fierce winter storms of 1993-1994. His predictions for the winter of 1998-1999:92 cold days, 59 wet days, 16 cyclonic storms (which last three days)
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1998
ARLINGTON, Vt. -- Extensive medical examinations were conducted, specialists were consulted, and the news from the doctors was not good: Charles Fisher, well into his 70s, needed a stomach operation.Fisher had faith in modern medicine, but he also had more consulting to do before consenting to the knife. It was important, he told his doctors, to schedule the operation on a day when the moon was concentrating on his head or feet -- and certainly not on his stomach.And to determine just when that might be, Fisher did what thousands of people have done for a couple of centuries now. He consulted his Hagers-Town Almanack.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1995
HAGERSTOWN -- Get out your woollies. Those well-known hairy weather foretellers -- the woolly bears -- are predicting a colder and wetter than normal winter. At least through mid-January.That prognostication comes from analysis of 384 of the black-and-reddish brown caterpillars collected last month in the venerable Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack's annual Woolly Bear Contest.The 199-year-old Almanack -- which accurately predicted the cold, snowy, icy winter of 1993-1994 -- forecasts a cold winter.
NEWS
October 14, 1995
CALL IT the winter of '94 flashback syndrome. Even on an Indian summer day in October, you hear that the venerable Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack is predicting above-average snow in Maryland this coming winter and you've all but got your car pointed in the direction of the grocery store for milk and toilet paper rations.The logical side of your brain tries to remind you that long-range weather forecasting is a fragile art. In fact, over the last five years, the almanac has been wrong as often as right.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 20, 1995
This Just In: It's going to snow . . . possibly by Hannukah, probably by Christmas, definitely by Kwanza. That's what I get from 1996 Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack. It says the winter ahead will come in like a lion and leave like one. Now, before you go pooh-poohing this voo-doo, remember something: The Hagerstown almanack shamed a lot of TV meteorologists by succesfully predicting the memorable mid-Atlantic storms of the winter of 1993-94. Its forecasts were so good -- predicting 14 of Maryland's 17 storms that winter -- it attracted the attention of NBC "Today Show" weatherman Willard Scott, and even Peter Jennings found room for a story on "ABC World News Tonight."
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | November 8, 1990
WHOA, hold onto your earmuffs. The woolly bear portends a hard winter, in the first part of the season, anyway.Oh, I know you go by what your local weatherman says, but let me tell you the 1991 Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack and the woolly bear may come closer to accurate weather predictions than your average weather satellite.This almanac has an outstanding record for weather prognosticating.Last year, the almanac's predictions, based on the contestants in the National Woolly Bear Month Contest, came out on target.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 20, 1995
This Just In: It's going to snow . . . possibly by Hannukah, probably by Christmas, definitely by Kwanza. That's what I get from 1996 Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack. It says the winter ahead will come in like a lion and leave like one. Now, before you go pooh-poohing this voo-doo, remember something: The Hagerstown almanack shamed a lot of TV meteorologists by succesfully predicting the memorable mid-Atlantic storms of the winter of 1993-94. Its forecasts were so good -- predicting 14 of Maryland's 17 storms that winter -- it attracted the attention of NBC "Today Show" weatherman Willard Scott, and even Peter Jennings found room for a story on "ABC World News Tonight."
NEWS
By CINDY PARR | January 23, 1995
I certainly have enjoyed the unseasonal weather we have been experiencing over the past couple of weeks.It beats the snow and ice we had one year ago.Like many people, I have a need to know what the weather has in store for me on any given day.Weather forecasts are offered with the nightly news.But being a native of Washington County, I have a tendency to follow weather predictions presented by the "Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack."Throughout its history of 198 years, the publication has given a fairly accurate account of weather in the Mid-Atlantic region.
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