Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAlmanac
IN THE NEWS

Almanac

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
December 29, 2005
Almanac-- Dec. 29--1170: Archbishop Thomas Becket was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral in England.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Paul McCardell, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
The almanacs are out with their winter predictions. The Old Farmer's Almanac published since 1792 and the Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack (since 1797) and Farmers' Almanac (since 1818) all are predicting a very cold winter with above-average amounts of snow for the Mid-Atlantic. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will release its outlook for this winter in October. Also, did you know that The Baltimore Sun once produced an almanac from 1876 to 1928?
Advertisement
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | June 15, 1993
ARLINGTON, Vt. -- At the keyboard of an IBM personal computer in a mountainous corner of northern New England, Charles W. Fisher tends the flame of a 196-year-old Maryland tradition.In a small office overlooking a trout stream, he keeps faith with his great-great-great grandfather, John Gruber, who established an almanac in Hagerstown in 1797.Without setting foot in the town where Mr. Gruber toiled in a print shop on South Potomac Street, Mr. Fisher writes and edits J. Gruber's Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack, the second-oldest continuously published almanac in America.
NEWS
October 13, 2013
Just in time for the winter that the Farmer's Almanac predicts will be a tough one, there is a new cordless and gas-free snow blower for homeowners. Snow Joe, which produces innovative tools for outdoor projects, offers a snow blower that runs for 25 to 40 minutes after each 3-hour charge and doesn't require a cord or gasoline – the Snow Joe iON. The iON also has an LED headlight and a 180-degree rotating chute that can be easily adjusted to control the snow stream, throwing it up to 20 feet at up to 495 pounds per minute.
FEATURES
By Susan Hipsley and Susan Hipsley,Special to The Sun | August 7, 1994
A person is never busier than during child-rearing years.So say the authorities -- including John Robinson, director of the Americans' Use of Time Project at the University of Maryland -- and so say the legion of parents careening through this frantic time in their lives.Perhaps at no other time do parents need more information to help with the task at hand. As one veteran mother says, "My kids didn't come with an instruction manual."Beth DeFrancis has compiled a book that answers parents' questions, and also serves as a resource guide.
FEATURES
By New York Times | October 21, 1991
THE OLD FARMER'S Almanac, the oldest continuously published American periodical, is just entering its 200th year.But despite its blatant nostalgia, this bit of Americana is marching vigorously into its third century, eyes forward.Yankee Publishing Inc., the parent company, says it has just completed the most successful year ever, with revenues of $35 million. The privately held company, which also publishes Yankee and Alaska magazines and the annual Travel Guide to New England, does not disclose profits, but Joseph B. Meagher, president and chief executive, describes them as healthy.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 1, 1993
DUBLIN, N.H. -- Here are some things you might like to know: California can expect heavy rain and snow the last week of March. Eating chocolate doesn't cause pimples. You can have a star named after you for $40. Leeches may be repugnant, but they've become a valuable source of biological insights in the laboratory.If all this is news, then you apparently haven't read the 1993 edition of The Old Farmer's Almanac, the venerable publication that for 201 years has been dispensing weather forecasts a year in advance (accuracy is 80 percent, the editors say)
FEATURES
By James H. Bready | August 28, 1994
What, to a collector, constitutes "excessively rare"?Ask to be shown something in print from Colonial Baltimore. The stuff scarcely exists. The first printer, Nicholas Hasselbach, arrived here in 1765, from Philadelphia. His name is on a Baltimore religious pamphlet -- the only known copy turned up in 1902, and is now at Johns Hopkins University.The first newspaper began in 1773 (printed by the purchasers of Hasselbach's types, he having been lost at sea in 1770). Otherwise, not much.But Hasselbach's Baltimore imprint is also on an almanac; a copy of it has just turned up. Again, a library is the owner -- at the University of Maryland College Park.
FEATURES
By David Margolick and David Margolick,New York Times News Service | January 3, 1991
NEW YORK The two publications could not be more different. One is countrified, timeless, folksy; the other considers itself sophisticated, urbane, chic and caustic.The one celebrates the rising and setting of the sun each day and can tell you precisely when they happen; the other records the rise of hemlines and the setting of trends. The one has the air of Lexington and Concord; the other, at least at times, reeks of Sodom and Gomorrah.Could anyone actually confuse the venerable Old Farmer's Almanac, which celebrates its 200th anniversary this year, and New York magazine, a child of the 1960s?
FEATURES
The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
It is plenty hot out, but the Farmers' Almanac is predicting a frigid winter with lots of snow. After several mild winters, I am not ready for this. What should I be gathering to prepare? The Red Cross and FEMA have some advice for you. First, make sure you can find your snow shovel! Then get a couple of bags of sand or other EPA-approved material - one for the steps and one for your car - to improve traction. Also, pack an emergency kit for your car that includes a shovel, windshield scraper and small broom, a flashlight, a battery-powered radio, extra batteries, water, snacks, matches, hats, socks and mittens, first-aid kit, blankets, booster cables, emergency flares and a fluorescent distress flag.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
The Farmers Almanac is calling for cold and snow to dominate the eastern two-thirds of the country this winter, ending what has been a stretch of relative snow drought. In the mid-Atlantic, however, the forecast left it up in the air whether precipitation will fall largely in the form of rain or snow. The forecast says to expect "copious" amounts of either. The biggest concern for snow in these parts lies in the first 10 days of February, the forecast suggests -- including the Feb. 2 Super Bowl at MetLife Stadium in New Jersey's Meadowlands.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
Yet another laurel for Michael Phelps' swim cap: The Olympian will grace the cover of the 2013 World Almanac. Phelps will be in good company, the Almanac folks announced Monday. Joining him in the prime spot are Barack Obama, Mitt Romney and, for some reason, Anne Hathaway. Phelps, however, bests them all for the sweetest center position. The Almanac chronicles the most important happenings of 2012. Phelps, right up there with the presidential election and such, was at the top of the list.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Count one more prognosticator among those calling for a snowy winter in Maryland -- the Farmer's Almanac. The publication's winter outlook calls for cold and moisture across the Northeast and Great Lakes region. That could mean a lot of snow for the northern parts, but some sleet and rain mixed in for the mid-Atlantic and Ohio Valley, according to the forecast. The almanac has pegged  February 12 - 15 and March 20 - 23 for "major coastal storms along the Atlantic seaboard" -- as in, potential repeats of Snowmageddon-like storms.
FEATURES
June 3, 2008
JUNE 3 1937 The Duke of Windsor, who had abdicated the British throne, married Wallis Warfield Simpson in Monts, France. 1989 Iran's spiritual leader, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, died.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.