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By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
The sprinkle of nutmeg on the eggnog, the whiff of gingerbread cookies baking in the oven, the aroma of cinnamon, cloves and allspice in the cider. These are the scents of the season. "They definitely bring up Christmas memories," says Ann D. Wilder, president of Vann's Spices, who lists allspice, cloves, nutmeg and cinnamon as the spices she most closely associates with the holidays. "It's what Christmas smells like to me, with a little evergreen thrown in." These spices, along with perhaps star anise and cardamom, have been enhancing Christmas recipes for centuries.
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NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
The sprinkle of nutmeg on the eggnog, the whiff of gingerbread cookies baking in the oven, the aroma of cinnamon, cloves and allspice in the cider. These are the scents of the season. "They definitely bring up Christmas memories," says Ann D. Wilder, president of Vann's Spices, who lists allspice, cloves, nutmeg and cinnamon as the spices she most closely associates with the holidays. "It's what Christmas smells like to me, with a little evergreen thrown in." These spices, along with perhaps star anise and cardamom, have been enhancing Christmas recipes for centuries.
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FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | March 22, 1998
1996 Pacific Rim Gewurztraminer, Monterey County ($10)This exceptional gewurztraminer, made by Bonny Doon Vineyards under one of Randall Grahm's many wine aliases, comes about as close to the Alsace style as any California wine can. Most California gewurztraminers tend to be either slightly HTC sweet or quite bitter. This is neither. It is a dry white wine of exceptional length and depth, with flavors of peach, nutmeg, clove and allspice.Pub Date: 3/22/98
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 2003
After spending a few days at the Grand Lido resort in Ocho Rios recently, I drove from Jamaica's north coast down to the capital city of Kingston. The route I took was called Fern Gully, a narrow road that twisted up, up, ever upward through a forest of dense, emerald foliage. Distracted by this organic splendor, people were driving crazily, honking their horns as they swung wide around blind curves. 3 limes cut in half 3 whole chickens cut in half 6 gloves of garlic 2 teaspoons allspice OTCH#
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 2003
After spending a few days at the Grand Lido resort in Ocho Rios recently, I drove from Jamaica's north coast down to the capital city of Kingston. The route I took was called Fern Gully, a narrow road that twisted up, up, ever upward through a forest of dense, emerald foliage. Distracted by this organic splendor, people were driving crazily, honking their horns as they swung wide around blind curves. 3 limes cut in half 3 whole chickens cut in half 6 gloves of garlic 2 teaspoons allspice OTCH#
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | January 22, 1992
There's something exotic about fresh apricots, especially when you find them on grocery shelves in the middle of January. Those showing up on produce counters now are from South America; they'll be available until the U.S.-grown crop starts appearing in April.Wherever they come from, there's a lot to be said for apricots, nutrition-wise. They're low in calories (51 per 3 fresh) and have little or no fat, sodium or cholesterol, but they're high in potassium and especially rich in carotene, the plant form of vitamin A.Here's a recipe for fresh apricots guaranteed to put a little sweetness and light into a midwinter meal.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | October 31, 1990
The holidays are rapidly approaching so please check your files. If you're missing a favorite recipe please send in your request as soon as possible.Perseverance pays off. Sometime ago, Ruth B. Mires, of Georgetown, Del., asked us to find her a recipe for Eccles Cake. She wrote that she had enjoyed the cakes while in England. We found this recipe in "Muffins and Quick Breads" by Irena Chalmers; Longmeadow Press -- 1989, $4.50.This recipe makes ten cakes.Eccles Cakes2 tablespoons butter, melted3 tablespoons sugar1/2 cup currants or raisins1 tablespoon chopped candied ginger1 teaspoon grated lemon rind1/8 teaspoon ground allspice1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg2 cups all-purpose flour1/2 teaspoon salt1 teaspoon sugar6 tablespoons butter, chilled3 tablespoons vegetable shortening3 to 4 tablespoons cold water1 egg yolk3 tablespoons cold milkCombine the butter, sugar, currants, ginger, lemon rind, allspice and nutmeg in a bowl.
FEATURES
By Faye Levy and Faye Levy,Los Angeles Times | August 31, 1994
Parisians love stuffed tomatoes. Colorful ready-to-bake tomatoes, mounded high with meat stuffing, catch your eye at the charcuteries. All you have to do is take them home and pop them in the oven.Another option for the busy cook is to go to a nearby butcher shop and buy "farce a tomates," or stuffing for tomatoes, which is basically seasoned ground meat with herbs.In many countries, the best-loved stuffings for tomatoes are based on rice or on mixtures of rice and meat. A tasty Lebanese filling combines rice with ground lamb, pine nuts, cilantro and allspice.
NEWS
By ANDREW CIOFALO | October 30, 1991
Mount Pinatubo was finally at rest -- at least that's the assumption most Americans made when the Philippine volcano disappeared from the headlines and TV newscasts late last summer. It reappeared occasionally as background to political stories about the negotiations between the U.S. and the Philippines over extending the leases of our air and naval bases there.But two weeks on a North Carolina beach at August's end and a move up county in September had sufficiently disconnected me from my newspaper, TV set and the noise that is Baltimore to have broken the threads of concern about events beyond my bucolic realm in the land of corn fields and horse farms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Houser III | October 26, 2011
Halloween drinks are, for the most part, novelty items. Fake eyeballs, candy corn and even dry ice are all unfortunately used to dramatic effect this time of year. I have never been a fan of silly or gimmicky drink accessories. It makes me think that the bartender has something to hide. What's behind the cuteness winds up being an overly sweet or sour weak drink that I just wasted good money on. Luckily, the good people at Jack's Bistro are here to save us from such garish garnishes.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | March 22, 1998
1996 Pacific Rim Gewurztraminer, Monterey County ($10)This exceptional gewurztraminer, made by Bonny Doon Vineyards under one of Randall Grahm's many wine aliases, comes about as close to the Alsace style as any California wine can. Most California gewurztraminers tend to be either slightly HTC sweet or quite bitter. This is neither. It is a dry white wine of exceptional length and depth, with flavors of peach, nutmeg, clove and allspice.Pub Date: 3/22/98
FEATURES
By Faye Levy and Faye Levy,Los Angeles Times | August 31, 1994
Parisians love stuffed tomatoes. Colorful ready-to-bake tomatoes, mounded high with meat stuffing, catch your eye at the charcuteries. All you have to do is take them home and pop them in the oven.Another option for the busy cook is to go to a nearby butcher shop and buy "farce a tomates," or stuffing for tomatoes, which is basically seasoned ground meat with herbs.In many countries, the best-loved stuffings for tomatoes are based on rice or on mixtures of rice and meat. A tasty Lebanese filling combines rice with ground lamb, pine nuts, cilantro and allspice.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | January 22, 1992
There's something exotic about fresh apricots, especially when you find them on grocery shelves in the middle of January. Those showing up on produce counters now are from South America; they'll be available until the U.S.-grown crop starts appearing in April.Wherever they come from, there's a lot to be said for apricots, nutrition-wise. They're low in calories (51 per 3 fresh) and have little or no fat, sodium or cholesterol, but they're high in potassium and especially rich in carotene, the plant form of vitamin A.Here's a recipe for fresh apricots guaranteed to put a little sweetness and light into a midwinter meal.
NEWS
By ANDREW CIOFALO | October 30, 1991
Mount Pinatubo was finally at rest -- at least that's the assumption most Americans made when the Philippine volcano disappeared from the headlines and TV newscasts late last summer. It reappeared occasionally as background to political stories about the negotiations between the U.S. and the Philippines over extending the leases of our air and naval bases there.But two weeks on a North Carolina beach at August's end and a move up county in September had sufficiently disconnected me from my newspaper, TV set and the noise that is Baltimore to have broken the threads of concern about events beyond my bucolic realm in the land of corn fields and horse farms.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | October 31, 1990
The holidays are rapidly approaching so please check your files. If you're missing a favorite recipe please send in your request as soon as possible.Perseverance pays off. Sometime ago, Ruth B. Mires, of Georgetown, Del., asked us to find her a recipe for Eccles Cake. She wrote that she had enjoyed the cakes while in England. We found this recipe in "Muffins and Quick Breads" by Irena Chalmers; Longmeadow Press -- 1989, $4.50.This recipe makes ten cakes.Eccles Cakes2 tablespoons butter, melted3 tablespoons sugar1/2 cup currants or raisins1 tablespoon chopped candied ginger1 teaspoon grated lemon rind1/8 teaspoon ground allspice1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg2 cups all-purpose flour1/2 teaspoon salt1 teaspoon sugar6 tablespoons butter, chilled3 tablespoons vegetable shortening3 to 4 tablespoons cold water1 egg yolk3 tablespoons cold milkCombine the butter, sugar, currants, ginger, lemon rind, allspice and nutmeg in a bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | February 25, 2014
Forget those Winter Olympians. Baltimore just welcomed home another kind of champion, one I can totally get behind: a winning cocktail. Crowned the as the people's choice winner at Sunday's Ryes Up Against Cystic Fibrosis charitable gala, the Spiced Nashi is a spicy little number with a hint of springtime flavor that we all desperately need. Created by Pabu Izakaya's head bartender Nick Jones, the Spiced Nashi battled it out with 17 other bars and restaurants to earn his prize (by the way, the grand cocktail champion of the night was The Canal Street, created by Fleet Street Kitchen's Tim Riley)
NEWS
October 18, 2006
It's time for our annual holiday cookie contest. This year, we're asking for recipes in two delicious categories: sugar and spice. In the sugar category, we're looking not so much for cutout sugar cookies as we are for sweet creations that have something unique about them. In the spice category, we'd love some distinctive takes on seasonal spices like cardamom, allspice, cloves and, of course, ginger. Send your favorite recipes to Kate Shatzkin, Food Editor, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278, fax them to 410-783-2519 or e-mail them to food@baltsun.
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