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By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | July 20, 1995
Fred W. Allnutt Sr. is back in familiar, troubled waters.The longtime tax resister and his son were indicted Tuesday on tax evasion charges by a federal grand jury -- the second time in 12 years the Ellicott City businessman has faced such charges.Mr. Allnutt and his son, Christopher Allnutt, were charged with conspiracy and willful evasion of paying taxes in a indictment obtained by the U.S. attorney's office in Baltimore.Christopher Allnutt, also of Ellicott City, was charged with an additional count of aiding and abetting his father.
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By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1999
In a game coached by two, well, Blasts from the past, the Maryland Mania started quickly yesterday but then faded into their fifth straight A-League loss, 4-1, against the deeper, clearly more experienced Rochester Raging Rhinos."
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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | October 18, 1992
The Internal Revenue Service has seized the business of a Howard County contractor who once said that paying taxes with paper money is unconstitutional.The $6 million lien -- based on a reported tax liability from 1981 through 1986 -- has put 60 employees and 20 subcontractors out of work and affected 100 other businesses in the county.Fred Waters Allnutt was convicted in 1983 of evading state taxes.He had refused to file a state tax return or pay property taxes because he believed payment with Federal Reserve notes violated the U.S. Constitution.
NEWS
July 9, 1996
Income taxes are constitutionalI don't know how most citizens feel about tax protesters but every report of another tax protest raises my ire to new levels.I have worked my entire life by the rules, paying my taxes and meeting the demands on my income.Yes, I would have loved not paying taxes or anything else, for that matter, but anywhere in a real world, that just isn't possible.Fred Allnutt Sr. is frivolously wasting my tax money butting his head against a brick wall. He, along with the others, are having an adverse impact on our national debt.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | April 10, 1995
Howard County is expected to get an $800,000 windfall later this month as part of bankruptcy proceedings for an Ellicott City businessman convicted of tax evasion.County Executive Charles I. Ecker said the money -- most of the delinquent taxes owed by Fred Waters Allnutt Sr. -- will go into the county's general fund."This is a rather large sum," Mr. Ecker said. "We're very fortunate to get it."Mr. Ecker said the money will not be earmarked for specific programs in the fiscal 1996 operating budget that he will unveil next week.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | June 24, 1993
An Internal Revenue Service posse appears to have finally caught up with Ellicott City developer Fred Waters Allnutt, a convicted tax evader who has been protesting payment of taxes for more than a decade.A U.S. district judge in Baltimore has issued a scathing opinion in which he ruled that Mr. Allnutt owns the trucks, earthmoving equipment and Ellicott City office building seized by the IRS last October in connection with a $6 million lien for nonpayment of taxes for 1981 through 1986.Mr.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1996
Fred Allnutt Sr. has fulfilled the fantasy of many Americans -- thumbing his nose at the Internal Revenue Service.The longtime Ellicott City tax protester and his son Christopher were acquitted in federal court last week of charges that they conspired to evade taxes by hiding their assets and not filing tax returns.While Mr. Allnutt avoided a possible decade of prison time, his tax woes are far from over.Mr. Allnutt, 54, still owes the IRS about $3 million in back taxes, interest and penalties for taxes he did not pay from 1981 to 1986, according to his defense team.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1996
Fred Allnutt Sr. has fulfilled the fantasy of many Americans -- thumbing his nose at the Internal Revenue Service.The longtime Ellicott City tax protester and his son Christopher were acquitted in federal court last week of charges that they conspired to evade taxes by hiding their assets and not filing tax returns.While Mr. Allnutt avoided a possible decade of prison time, his tax woes are far from over.Mr. Allnutt, 54, still owes the IRS about $3 million in back taxes, interest and penalties for taxes he did not pay from 1981 to 1986, according to his defense team.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | November 12, 1992
Until the Internal Revenue Service filed a $6 million lien TC against Ellicott City developer Fred Waters Allnutt last month, it looked like Howard County might never collect the personal property taxes he owes.As a result of the lien, Mr. Allnutt filed for bankruptcy protection. The county now hopes to recoup at least 10 cents on the dollar -- no small change in Mr. Allnutt's case.The county estimates that Mr. Allnutt owes between $850,000 and $1.2 million in unpaid personal property taxes and in penalties for non-payment.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | November 3, 1992
A Howard County excavating company seized by the Internal Revenue Service Oct. 5 to satisfy a $6 million tax lien has resumed operations under Chapter 11 of the federal bankruptcy code.Baltimore attorney Mark J. Friedman was appointed trustee of JFC Excavating Oct. 27 after the owner, Fred Waters Allnutt, filed for protection under federal bankruptcy laws.Mr. Allnutt and other company managers continue to run the company on a daily basis but "report to me under my supervision," Mr. Friedman said.
NEWS
July 5, 1996
THE WORD "hero" is an accurate description for those who make sacrifices to help others. The soldier who dies defending his country, the woman who donates a kidney to her mother, the teen-aged youth who raises his brother are examples that come to mind. "Hero" is not a fitting moniker for a tax resister, even when acquitted of federal tax evasion charges.But that is what Fred Allnutt Sr. calls himself as he criss-crosses the country via radio talk shows and cable television. He was also appearing at a California rally as the new poster boy for the tax protest movement.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1996
Meet Fred Allnutt Sr. Devout Christian. Father of three. Slayer of the IRS.The Ellicott City native has not filed a tax return in 15 years, but was recently acquitted of tax evasion and conspiracy charges. Now he's the newest poster boy for the tax-protester movement."Yeah, I'm a hero," says Allnutt, 54, his mouth wrinkling in a wry smile. "Of course, I knew that before the indictment."His phone has been ringing off the hook since his March acquittal, he says. He's been on radio talk shows, cable television and this week he's heading to California to speak at the National Patriots' Rally -- a convention of self-proclaimed "constitutionalists" who decry what they see as abuses of the government.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1996
Fred Allnutt Sr. has fulfilled the fantasy of many Americans -- thumbing his nose at the Internal Revenue Service.The longtime Ellicott City tax protester and his son Christopher were acquitted in federal court last week of charges that they conspired to evade taxes by hiding their assets and not filing tax returns.While Mr. Allnutt avoided a possible decade of prison time, his tax woes are far from over.Mr. Allnutt, 54, still owes the IRS about $3 million in back taxes, interest and penalties for taxes he did not pay from 1981 to 1986, according to his defense team.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1996
Fred Allnutt Sr. has fulfilled the fantasy of many Americans -- thumbing his nose at the Internal Revenue Service.The longtime Ellicott City tax protester and his son Christopher were acquitted in federal court last week of charges that they conspired to evade taxes by hiding their assets and not filing tax returns.While Mr. Allnutt avoided a possible decade of prison time, his tax woes are far from over.Mr. Allnutt, 54, still owes the IRS about $3 million in back taxes, interest and penalties for taxes he did not pay from 1981 to 1986, according to his defense team.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | July 20, 1995
Fred W. Allnutt Sr. is back in familiar, troubled waters.The longtime tax resister and his son were indicted Tuesday on tax evasion charges by a federal grand jury -- the second time in 12 years the Ellicott City businessman has faced such charges.Mr. Allnutt and his son, Christopher Allnutt, were charged with conspiracy and willful evasion of paying taxes in a indictment obtained by the U.S. attorney's office in Baltimore.Christopher Allnutt, also of Ellicott City, was charged with an additional count of aiding and abetting his father.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | April 10, 1995
Howard County is expected to get an $800,000 windfall later this month as part of bankruptcy proceedings for an Ellicott City businessman convicted of tax evasion.County Executive Charles I. Ecker said the money -- most of the delinquent taxes owed by Fred Waters Allnutt Sr. -- will go into the county's general fund."This is a rather large sum," Mr. Ecker said. "We're very fortunate to get it."Mr. Ecker said the money will not be earmarked for specific programs in the fiscal 1996 operating budget that he will unveil next week.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | September 23, 1993
A Baltimore attorney asked permission in federal bankruptcy court yesterday to dissolve a once-thriving Ellicott City excavating business and sell its assets at public action in November.Mark J. Friedman, trustee for convicted tax evader Fred Waters Allnutt Sr., told the court that his planned liquidation of JFC Excavating between Nov. 9 and Nov. 18 is a strategy of last resort.He earlier sought to reorganize the company but could not find the necessary leadership, Mr. Friedman said. He next sent a prospectus to 14 potential buyers, but none made an offer until after he decided to auction the assets, Mr. Friedman said.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | September 29, 1993
Entrepreneur Nicholas B. Mangione and a Texas auctioneering company worked out an eleventh-hour deal from the witness stand in federal bankruptcy court yesterday that will save an Ellicott City excavating company from liquidation.Mr. Mangione and Miller and Miller Auctioneers Inc. of Fort Worth, Texas, have agreed to buy JFC Excavating on Baltimore National Pike in Ellicott City from the court-appointed trustee for $7.3 million. Mr. Mangione plans to take possession of the company at midnight Sunday.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | November 21, 1993
Convicted tax evader Fred Waters Allnutt stood outside the Ellicott City building that bears his name, watching in silence Thursday as his lifelong dream took a nightmarish turn.Eight rows of construction equipment that his JFC Excavating company owned until it was seized by the Internal Revenue Service on Oct. 2, 1992, for nonpayment of taxes was sold at auction Thursday for $4.8 million.The sale ends this chapter of his 12-year battle with the IRS over the legality of its taxing power.If any in the crowd of more than 150 people noticed Mr. Allnutt, they did not show it."
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | September 29, 1993
Entrepreneur Nicholas B. Mangione and a Texas auctioneering company worked out an eleventh-hour deal from the witness stand in federal bankruptcy court yesterday that will save an Ellicott City excavating company from liquidation.Mr. Mangione and Miller and Miller Auctioneers Inc. of Fort Worth, Texas, have agreed to buy JFC Excavating on Baltimore National Pike in Ellicott City from the court-appointed trustee for $7.3 million. Mr. Mangione plans to take possession of the company at midnight Sunday.
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