Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAllman Brothers Band
IN THE NEWS

Allman Brothers Band

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | November 2, 2006
Slide guitarist Derek Trucks is something of a child prodigy -- even at age 27. In addition to the Derek Trucks Band, which plays Rams Head Live tomorrow night, Trucks is a member of the Allman Brothers Band and recently finished touring with Eric Clapton. Most of Trucks' musical peers are at least a generation older than he. Some of them are more than twice his age. It's been that way since he started touring regularly at age 10 or 11. But looking back, Trucks said, he doesn't regret spending his teenage years on the road.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
The jam scene is full of long shows, special guests and perpetually touring bands. But few players have been in as many bands and stayed on the road as much as Warren Haynes. Often seen as the hardest-working man in one of the most musically and physically demanding genres, Haynes always seems to be on the road with one group or the next. "The past 10 years have been really busy," Haynes said. That's one way to put it. Haynes is everywhere — a member of the Southern rock staples the Allman Brothers Band and legendary jammers the Dead, and the front man of blues rock group Gov't Mule, which headlines Artscape Saturday.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By NICHOLAS TESTA | April 3, 2008
Carlos Santana and Derek Trucks have been listed by Rolling Stone as some of the best guitarists of all time. Maintaining his fusion of Latin style and smooth riffs, Santana has enjoyed a continuing resurgence in popularity. As a member of the Allman Brothers Band, Trucks is known for his silky blues guitar. The gates open at 5:30 p.m. Sunday at Merriweather Post Pavilion. Tickets are $35-$75. Merriweather is at 10475 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticketmaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2008
Just announced Alanis Morissette: Lyric Opera House on Sept. 25. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Marc Broussard: Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis on Sept. 18. 410-268-4545 or ramsheadtavern.com. Gaelic Storm: Recher Theatre in Towson on Sept. 5. 410-337-7210, 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Still available Journey: Nissan Pavilion in Bristow, Va., on Aug. 27. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Sonny Landreth: The Birchmere in Alexandria, Va., on Sept. 13. 703-549-7500 or birchmere.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2008
Just announced Alanis Morissette: Lyric Opera House on Sept. 25. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Marc Broussard: Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis on Sept. 18. 410-268-4545 or ramsheadtavern.com. Gaelic Storm: Recher Theatre in Towson on Sept. 5. 410-337-7210, 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Still available Journey: Nissan Pavilion in Bristow, Va., on Aug. 27. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Sonny Landreth: The Birchmere in Alexandria, Va., on Sept. 13. 703-549-7500 or birchmere.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 21, 1990
It used to be that the rallying cry for most Southern roc bands was "The South will rise again!" Indeed, there was a time in the mid-'70s, when acts like the Allman Brothers Band, Lynyrd Skynyrd, the Marshall Tucker Band and Elvin Bishop ruled the airwaves, that it almost did seem as if the power of the music would somehow recapture the glories of the past.Not anymore, though. In fact, as Butch Trucks sees it, he and the rest of the Allman Brothers Band would just as soon put the past -- their past -- behind them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 26, 1994
Playing at Woodstock '94 was a lot of fun, says Butch Trucks, one of the drummers with the Allman Brothers Band.Granted, playing so early in the day Sunday meant that the crowd had a little warming up to do. "It took us a while to get 'em," he admits, over the phone from a tour stop in Richmond, Va. "They were out there wallowing in the mud and dancing, and I think we were about halfway through the set before they realized we were up there."He laughs, and adds, "Once they did, we seemed to really strike a note."
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | June 22, 2006
The sun's a demon, school's out and there's nothing on TV but reruns. So now that summer's officially here, you can use all that downtime to get lost in music. This week's playlist column is devoted to recent reissues: a deluxe edition of a rock masterpiece, two volumes of unearthed soul, an overlooked jewel of a record by a celebrated pop stylist and a newly discovered jazz album by a diva supreme. The Allman Brothers Band Eat a Peach Call me a young fogey if you want, but I'm a bit tired of the noisy, snarly garage punk sound that many rock critics seem to favor these days.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 13, 1995
New York -- Awards shows are usually stuffy, star-studded events at which everything said sounds as if it came straight off the TelePrompTer. They're predictable, monotonous and stupifyingly dull.Fortunately, the 10th Annual Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Dinner is nothing like an awards show.Sure, speeches are made and statues change hands, but where that's usually the end of awards shows, that's only the beginning for the Hall of Fame. For one thing, most of the inductees and many of the inductors come ready to play -- meaning that this year's crowd got to hear first-rate performances by everyone from the Allman Brothers Band to Al Green (on his own and with Willie Nelson)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
The jam scene is full of long shows, special guests and perpetually touring bands. But few players have been in as many bands and stayed on the road as much as Warren Haynes. Often seen as the hardest-working man in one of the most musically and physically demanding genres, Haynes always seems to be on the road with one group or the next. "The past 10 years have been really busy," Haynes said. That's one way to put it. Haynes is everywhere — a member of the Southern rock staples the Allman Brothers Band and legendary jammers the Dead, and the front man of blues rock group Gov't Mule, which headlines Artscape Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NICHOLAS TESTA | April 3, 2008
Carlos Santana and Derek Trucks have been listed by Rolling Stone as some of the best guitarists of all time. Maintaining his fusion of Latin style and smooth riffs, Santana has enjoyed a continuing resurgence in popularity. As a member of the Allman Brothers Band, Trucks is known for his silky blues guitar. The gates open at 5:30 p.m. Sunday at Merriweather Post Pavilion. Tickets are $35-$75. Merriweather is at 10475 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticketmaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | November 2, 2006
Slide guitarist Derek Trucks is something of a child prodigy -- even at age 27. In addition to the Derek Trucks Band, which plays Rams Head Live tomorrow night, Trucks is a member of the Allman Brothers Band and recently finished touring with Eric Clapton. Most of Trucks' musical peers are at least a generation older than he. Some of them are more than twice his age. It's been that way since he started touring regularly at age 10 or 11. But looking back, Trucks said, he doesn't regret spending his teenage years on the road.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | June 22, 2006
The sun's a demon, school's out and there's nothing on TV but reruns. So now that summer's officially here, you can use all that downtime to get lost in music. This week's playlist column is devoted to recent reissues: a deluxe edition of a rock masterpiece, two volumes of unearthed soul, an overlooked jewel of a record by a celebrated pop stylist and a newly discovered jazz album by a diva supreme. The Allman Brothers Band Eat a Peach Call me a young fogey if you want, but I'm a bit tired of the noisy, snarly garage punk sound that many rock critics seem to favor these days.
NEWS
By Seth Rosen and Seth Rosen,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2004
Former Allman Brothers Band guitarist Dickey Betts, clad in a straw cowboy hat with a sweat-drenched red bandanna around his neck, commands center stage at the Recher Theatre, frenetically soloing as his band rolls though his timeless "Jessica." Tie-dyed teenagers and older fans in polo shirts sway as a unit to the dips and peaks of Betts' effervescent guitar work, which fills the converted movie theater's expansive concert hall. Betts, who with his band Great Southern played the Recher last weekend - followed a night later by Nils Lofgren of Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band - is among a roster of music legends and rising stars who have performed there in recent years.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 13, 1995
New York -- Awards shows are usually stuffy, star-studded events at which everything said sounds as if it came straight off the TelePrompTer. They're predictable, monotonous and stupifyingly dull.Fortunately, the 10th Annual Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Dinner is nothing like an awards show.Sure, speeches are made and statues change hands, but where that's usually the end of awards shows, that's only the beginning for the Hall of Fame. For one thing, most of the inductees and many of the inductors come ready to play -- meaning that this year's crowd got to hear first-rate performances by everyone from the Allman Brothers Band to Al Green (on his own and with Willie Nelson)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 26, 1994
Playing at Woodstock '94 was a lot of fun, says Butch Trucks, one of the drummers with the Allman Brothers Band.Granted, playing so early in the day Sunday meant that the crowd had a little warming up to do. "It took us a while to get 'em," he admits, over the phone from a tour stop in Richmond, Va. "They were out there wallowing in the mud and dancing, and I think we were about halfway through the set before they realized we were up there."He laughs, and adds, "Once they did, we seemed to really strike a note."
NEWS
By Seth Rosen and Seth Rosen,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2004
Former Allman Brothers Band guitarist Dickey Betts, clad in a straw cowboy hat with a sweat-drenched red bandanna around his neck, commands center stage at the Recher Theatre, frenetically soloing as his band rolls though his timeless "Jessica." Tie-dyed teenagers and older fans in polo shirts sway as a unit to the dips and peaks of Betts' effervescent guitar work, which fills the converted movie theater's expansive concert hall. Betts, who with his band Great Southern played the Recher last weekend - followed a night later by Nils Lofgren of Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band - is among a roster of music legends and rising stars who have performed there in recent years.
FEATURES
July 27, 2006
Dickey Betts Dickey Betts and Kenny Wayne Shepherd perform tonight at Rams Head Live. Betts was a member of the Allman Brothers Band. Doors open at 6:30, show starts at 8:30. Rams Head Live is at 20 Market Place. Tickets are $43. Call 410-244-1131 or visit ramsheadlive.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 21, 1990
It used to be that the rallying cry for most Southern roc bands was "The South will rise again!" Indeed, there was a time in the mid-'70s, when acts like the Allman Brothers Band, Lynyrd Skynyrd, the Marshall Tucker Band and Elvin Bishop ruled the airwaves, that it almost did seem as if the power of the music would somehow recapture the glories of the past.Not anymore, though. In fact, as Butch Trucks sees it, he and the rest of the Allman Brothers Band would just as soon put the past -- their past -- behind them.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.