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By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2000
General Motors Corp. revealed yesterday that it is considering an expansion of its Allison Transmission operation, perhaps in White Marsh. Word of the possible Allison expansion came during a meeting of top GM and state officials held in Annapolis to discuss the world's largest automaker's future in Maryland. While hinting of an Allison expansion, the GM executives declined to commit to either retooling or replacing the company's 65-year-old van assembly plant in Baltimore. The two sides agreed to additional meetings.
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NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2010
Baltimore County Council members unanimously approved a $6 million grant to expand the General Motors Allison Transmission Plant in White Marsh. The project is expected to result in 189 new jobs. The state has awarded $3 million for the project. The state and county will also provide workforce training grants of $1.5 million and $150,000 respectively. raven.hill@baltsun.com
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BUSINESS
By Jay Apperson and Ted Shelsby and Jay Apperson and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1999
Maryland and Baltimore County lured a General Motors Corp. transmission manufacturing plant to White Marsh by arranging a multimillion-dollar package of grants, loans, tax breaks, road improvements -- and even a discount on the company's power bill, officials said yesterday.Gov. Parris N. Glendening, Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger and a contingent of state and county officials gathered in the dust of a depleted sand and gravel quarry yesterday to bask in news of the state's first new heavy manufacturing plant in nearly three decades.
BUSINESS
By ALLISON CONNOLLY and ALLISON CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2006
For the past two months, Chip Long pondered what it would be like to have a $70,000 check in his pocket. That is what his employer, General Motors Corp., is willing to pay him to leave the company. The trade-off: give up health insurance and other benefits - and any chance for ever again working for the automaker. It might seem an easy choice for a skilled millwright who likely would soon find another job. But for Long, 43, the chance of snagging a coveted spot at GM's Allison Transmission plant in White Marsh is a powerful magnet.
BUSINESS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2004
Maryland political leaders, who have spent years fighting to keep jobs at the Baltimore General Motors plant, said they were saddened but not surprised to learn yesterday that the factory will close next year. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said his administration has been preparing for the bad news since he came into office and that he suspects his predecessor did the same. When GM executives went to Annapolis to brief him yesterday afternoon, he was ready with ideas and demands. Ehrlich said he asked GM to give the state the land for free.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2002
In his continuing effort to ensure a future for the General Motors Corp. van assembly plant in Baltimore, Gov. Parris N. Glendening met with the company's top U.S. vehicle manufacturing executive yesterday, but came away with no promises of a new product for the company's 67-year-old facility - or for an expansion of its new Allison transmission plant in White Marsh. "No announcements were made," GM spokesman Brian Goebel said of the meeting between Guy Briggs, vice president of vehicle manufacturing, and the governor.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2001
Personnel managers at the local General Motors Corp. van assembly plant are scrambling to find jobs for about 250 workers being recalled from layoff. "There are not enough slots in the plant" for everybody coming back, plant spokesman Brian Goebel said yesterday as GM considered a number of options, including having workers perform community service, to earn their paychecks. Under the terms of the national contract between GM and the United Auto Workers, assembly plant workers laid off last July are required to be recalled after 42 weeks.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | June 13, 1999
DID Maryland win a consolation prize last month? Or did the General Motors Co.'s decision to build a $214 million transmission plant in Baltimore County signal even better news ahead about the future of GM's outmoded Broening Highway plant, which employs 2,800 local workers?Taking a pessimistic view, the Allison Transmission division plant that will start rising on a 65-acre tract between Philadelphia Road and Pulaski Highway this summer is GM's way of thanking Baltimore for 64 years of high-caliber auto-manufacturing at Broening Highway.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2001
WILMINGTON, Del. - The president and chief executive of General Motors Corp. hinted - but stopped short of saying - yesterday that the company's big investment in the Allison Transmission plant in White Marsh is designed to offset the closing of the van assembly plant in Baltimore, "We did make the major investment in the Allison Transmission plant to focus specifically to providing opportunities for a long-standing GM work force" in Baltimore, G....
BUSINESS
By ALLISON CONNOLLY and ALLISON CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2006
For the past two months, Chip Long pondered what it would be like to have a $70,000 check in his pocket. That is what his employer, General Motors Corp., is willing to pay him to leave the company. The trade-off: give up health insurance and other benefits - and any chance for ever again working for the automaker. It might seem an easy choice for a skilled millwright who likely would soon find another job. But for Long, 43, the chance of snagging a coveted spot at GM's Allison Transmission plant in White Marsh is a powerful magnet.
BUSINESS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2004
Maryland political leaders, who have spent years fighting to keep jobs at the Baltimore General Motors plant, said they were saddened but not surprised to learn yesterday that the factory will close next year. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said his administration has been preparing for the bad news since he came into office and that he suspects his predecessor did the same. When GM executives went to Annapolis to brief him yesterday afternoon, he was ready with ideas and demands. Ehrlich said he asked GM to give the state the land for free.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2002
In his continuing effort to ensure a future for the General Motors Corp. van assembly plant in Baltimore, Gov. Parris N. Glendening met with the company's top U.S. vehicle manufacturing executive yesterday, but came away with no promises of a new product for the company's 67-year-old facility - or for an expansion of its new Allison transmission plant in White Marsh. "No announcements were made," GM spokesman Brian Goebel said of the meeting between Guy Briggs, vice president of vehicle manufacturing, and the governor.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2001
WILMINGTON, Del. - The president and chief executive of General Motors Corp. hinted - but stopped short of saying - yesterday that the company's big investment in the Allison Transmission plant in White Marsh is designed to offset the closing of the van assembly plant in Baltimore, "We did make the major investment in the Allison Transmission plant to focus specifically to providing opportunities for a long-standing GM work force" in Baltimore, G....
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2001
Personnel managers at the local General Motors Corp. van assembly plant are scrambling to find jobs for about 250 workers being recalled from layoff. "There are not enough slots in the plant" for everybody coming back, plant spokesman Brian Goebel said yesterday as GM considered a number of options, including having workers perform community service, to earn their paychecks. Under the terms of the national contract between GM and the United Auto Workers, assembly plant workers laid off last July are required to be recalled after 42 weeks.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2000
General Motors Corp. revealed yesterday that it is considering an expansion of its Allison Transmission operation, perhaps in White Marsh. Word of the possible Allison expansion came during a meeting of top GM and state officials held in Annapolis to discuss the world's largest automaker's future in Maryland. While hinting of an Allison expansion, the GM executives declined to commit to either retooling or replacing the company's 65-year-old van assembly plant in Baltimore. The two sides agreed to additional meetings.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | June 13, 1999
DID Maryland win a consolation prize last month? Or did the General Motors Co.'s decision to build a $214 million transmission plant in Baltimore County signal even better news ahead about the future of GM's outmoded Broening Highway plant, which employs 2,800 local workers?Taking a pessimistic view, the Allison Transmission division plant that will start rising on a 65-acre tract between Philadelphia Road and Pulaski Highway this summer is GM's way of thanking Baltimore for 64 years of high-caliber auto-manufacturing at Broening Highway.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2010
Baltimore County Council members unanimously approved a $6 million grant to expand the General Motors Allison Transmission Plant in White Marsh. The project is expected to result in 189 new jobs. The state has awarded $3 million for the project. The state and county will also provide workforce training grants of $1.5 million and $150,000 respectively. raven.hill@baltsun.com
NEWS
By JAY APPERSON and JAY APPERSON,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1999
General Motors Corp. has selected a depleted gravel quarry near Interstate 95 in White Marsh as the site of a new $250 million transmission manufacturing plant, government and real estate sources said yesterday.An announcement of Baltimore County's biggest economic development coup since credit card giant MBNA moved its regional operations to the county two years ago was expected to come from state and county officials today.Economic incentives, which have not been disclosed, were offered to land the project, government sources said.
BUSINESS
By Jay Apperson and Ted Shelsby and Jay Apperson and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1999
Maryland and Baltimore County lured a General Motors Corp. transmission manufacturing plant to White Marsh by arranging a multimillion-dollar package of grants, loans, tax breaks, road improvements -- and even a discount on the company's power bill, officials said yesterday.Gov. Parris N. Glendening, Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger and a contingent of state and county officials gathered in the dust of a depleted sand and gravel quarry yesterday to bask in news of the state's first new heavy manufacturing plant in nearly three decades.
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