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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2010
In the end, it was chicken on a string that brought a wayward "alligator" out of the Patapsco River. A two-hour search on Monday evening by Natural Resources Police failed to find a trace of the critter. But Eric Hammack Jr., the 16-year-old fisherman who first reported the reptile on Sunday, returned to the pond off Belle Grove Road in Patapsco Valley State Park on Tuesday. He had decided to try luring the gator with a hunk of chicken on a string. "It was a chicken wing," said Hammack, who lives nearby in Pumphrey and fishes in the park often.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
Police conducting a search warrant in West Baltimore got a surprise when they encountered three alligators, a pit bull and a turtle.  On Nov. 21 police raided a second-floor apartment in the 1900 block of McCulloh St., in the Druid Heights neighborhood, where they found smoking devices, razors, and baggies with drug residue, and ammunition, police wrote in a court documents. Also in the hallway: two alligators and a turtle. A pit bull was in the kitchen, and another alligator was found in the rear second-floor bedroom.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2010
Weeks of relentless, steamy heat is bad enough. But tropical reptiles in the Patapsco River? Eric Hammack Jr., 16, says he saw an alligator while fishing Sunday evening with his cousin in Patapsco Valley State Park off Belle Grove Road, not far from his home in Pumphrey in northern Anne Arundel County. Just after 6 p.m., he said, "I heard all this splashing." He didn't see anything he could identify at first, just something swimming from the shore into the pond's deeper water.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
An alligator was seized from an alleged Jessup gang member's home after Anne Arundel County police executed a search warrant in a drug investigation. The three-foot American Alligator, along with $3,000 worth of marijuana, cash and other items were taken from a home in the 7500 block of Gleneagle Drive on Friday. Alligators are not permitted in a residence and animal control was called to the home. Police said the alligator was healthy and was taken to a facility for exotic animals.
FEATURES
By ELSA KLENSCH and ELSA KLENSCH,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | November 16, 1995
In 1953 I bought an alligator bag and matching shoes in New Orleans. Although they are beautiful and unusual, I no longer wear them. I hear that alligator accessories such as these are sold in antique clothing stores for quite a lot of money. Is this true?Yes, alligator bags and shoes are sold in many antique markets. To get the scoop for you I asked Terin Fischer of Out of Our Closet, a New York City store that sells used designer clothing.She says that while alligator pieces are popular, not every item commands a high price.
NEWS
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 21, 2004
WASHINGTON - Undersea explorers will plunge into the waters off Cape Hatteras and into the depths of long-forgotten history tomorrow in hopes of finding the 141-year-old wreckage of the U.S. Navy's first submarine. Named the Alligator because of its green color and the leglike oars that initially propelled it, the vessel was launched in 1862. It failed in its missions against Confederate targets in Virginia's Hampton Roads area and sank off North Carolina's Outer Banks while under tow in a fierce storm in 1863.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 21, 2003
An unlikely discovery in France's naval archives has put American researchers hot on the trail of the Union submarine Alligator, the U.S. Navy's first commissioned submarine and the first to enter a combat zone. Unlike its Confederate counterpart, the H.L. Hunley, the ill-fated Alligator didn't sink any ships or kill anybody, either enemy sailors or its own crew. And when it was lost in a fierce storm off Cape Hatteras, N.C., in 1863, it was nearly lost to history as well. A recent discovery in the French archives of the vessel's blueprints, however, has stimulated new interest in the ship and has prompted federal authorities to try to find and raise it. The search is also sparking interest in the vessel's mysterious creator, Brutus De Villeroi, an eccentric Frenchman who listed his occupation on the 1860 census as "natural genius."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2004
Its thick green scales, glowing yellow eyes and menacing toothy grin were designed to intimidate the waterfowl. But, so far, this phony alligator head, bobbing on the calm waters of Westminster Community Pond, has not scared a single creature. The ploy doesn't even fool the children who play in the surrounding park and feed the ever-increasing number of fowl. "He is not scary, and he is fake," said Ryan Black, 4, visiting the park with his grandmother. "I don't see him swimming." In an effort to control the proliferating population of Canada geese and domestic ducks, Carroll County spent $150 for a pair of plastic alligators and dropped one in the 1-acre pond, a few hundred yards from the noise and traffic on Route 140. The other plastic gator is in reserve, waiting for a possible assignment.
NEWS
By MICHAEL MARTINEZ and MICHAEL MARTINEZ,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 16, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Forget the car chases. Forget the shootouts. Forget the lions and bears running amok in the urban landscape. Los Angeles has a new marquee attraction: Reggie the alligator, a 7-foot-long public menace that was illegally set loose in a 53-acre city lake last fall. It was Day 308 as of yesterday in the hunt for Reggie, and the city has just about had enough with the elusive gator. Any day now, Reggie is expected to emerge from hibernation, and the Los Angeles City Council will then welcome its fourth gator wrangler in the quest to remove the reptilian scourge and put it in the zoo where a better home awaits.
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2002
Some people have a way of stating the obvious. "Gee," said Daphne Soares, "what are these little dots on the face?" She was not being rude. It was not the pimply face of a little friend or the stubbled chin of an old grandfather. It wasn't even human at all. Soares was staring at an alligator. Sitting atop the 8-foot-long creature in the back of a pickup truck roaring along a Louisiana backwater -- just graduate student and gator -- Soares finally asked the right question about a species that, after 200 million years of belly-scraping in the bayous, no one else had bothered to become quite so intimate with.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2011
Jack Ramsey was chugging along in the Baltimore Marathon Saturday when he spotted the penguin by the side of the road. So he stopped, fished a camera from his pocket and took a picture of Tails, a six-year-old African blackfooted penguin who lives in the Maryland Zoo. "My wife loves penguins," said Ramsey, of Taneytown. "If I didn't take its picture, she'd be mad at me, no matter how much time I lost doing it. " For the first time in the marathon's 11-year history, participants ran for one-half mile through part of the zoo. Though the route bypassed exhibits, runners still met up with a cast of critters along the way - everything from a Chinese alligator to a North American striped skunk.
TRAVEL
By Kayla Cross Bawroski, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
You don't need a reason to visit historic Havre de Grace, ideally located at the confluence of the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay, but it doesn't hurt if the reason involves seafood. Lots of it. The "jewel" of Harford County has alligator nuggets, creole fish and crabmeat fritters this weekend, all part of the Havre de Grace Seafood Festival, Now in its 30th year, the festival features more than 150 types of food, 100 craft vendors, free admission and parking, and is continually growing.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2010
In the end, it was chicken on a string that brought a wayward "alligator" out of the Patapsco River. A two-hour search on Monday evening by Natural Resources Police failed to find a trace of the critter. But Eric Hammack Jr., the 16-year-old fisherman who first reported the reptile on Sunday, returned to the pond off Belle Grove Road in Patapsco Valley State Park on Tuesday. He had decided to try luring the gator with a hunk of chicken on a string. "It was a chicken wing," said Hammack, who lives nearby in Pumphrey and fishes in the park often.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2010
Maryland Natural Resources police have interviewed the young fisherman who reported spying an alligator in the Patapsco River. And they say they believe him. But a preliminary search of the area late Monday failed to turn up any further evidence of the tropical reptile. "We believe the gentleman. That's why we sent an officer out to investigate," said Sgt. Art Windemuth, spokesman for the Department of Natural Resources Police. Animal control officers also joined the search. But no alligator appeared.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | November 12, 2008
OK, so you walk into your office this morning and there's a black cat perched on your keyboard. Mildly alarming, right? But there's also a neon-pink alligator sitting in your chair, and he's salivating. Which is of greater concern? When you look at the Orioles' problems this offseason, shortstop is the black cat. Last year's options brought plenty of poor fortune, and the team probably won't be a winner unless they're removed. But it shouldn't be all that hard to push them aside and find a competent professional.
NEWS
June 6, 2008
An Anne Arundel County Animal Control officer pulled a 2-foot-long alligator out of a golf course pond, authorities said yesterday. A golfer first spotted the reptile May 30 in a pond at the Arundel Golf Park in Glen Burnie. The sighting prompted a hunting expedition of sorts for an animal control officer, who put down traps for several days but came up with nothing. It wasn't until another animal control officer, Glenn Johnson, went searching Wednesday with a rod and reel that the alligator was captured.
NEWS
January 31, 1999
"In 'Zack's Alligator' by Shirley Mozelle, a boy named Zack got a box from his father. Inside the box was an alligator key. When Zack put water on the alligator, it became real. Read and find out if this alligator will be mean or friendly."-- Danez Jones, Leith Walk Elementary"I liked the book 'The Kissing Hand' by Audrey Penn. It is about loving and caring. Chester the raccoon learns that his mom's love is always with him."-- Julia Benjamin, Thunder Hill ElementaryThe Sun invites its young readers to send in their book reviews, and we will print them on this page or on sunspot.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 1, 2008
Though the interstate highway system has been the death of many roadside attractions, you can still experience the magic of alligator wrestling at many locations in South Florida. Native Village, a well-known gator wrestling site on the Seminole Indian Reservation, is just minutes from the Orioles' Fort Lauderdale training camp. If you're bored with Disney World, there's also a popular spot in the Orlando area called Gatorland, where you can have your picture taken astride a live alligator.
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