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By Robin T. Reid and Robin T. Reid,Special to the Sun | April 2, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Louise Holton often jokes that she never tells people how many cats she has. Because, in truth, the number is impossible to count. In the United States, there are the more than 60 million feral cats (semi-wild felines that have grown up without human contact), and Holton has taken responsibility for each one of them. The 58-year-old is the co-founder of Alley Cat Allies, a national nonprofit organization based in Washington. Working out of offices in the city's funky Adams-Morgan neighborhood, the 13-member staff answers some 500 calls a month, gives out advice on handling feral cats, and cares for some decidedly non-ferals that sleep on whatever lap is available.
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NEWS
September 26, 2014
In late August, Richard Henry Lee Elementary School in Glen Burnie had to close its doors because a feral cat had found its way into the building. In closing the school, officials demonstrated prudent concern for the health and well-being of students. Feral cat activists bemoaned the caution exercised by officials, charging that officials had reacted to the feral cat sighting with the severity of a bomb threat after a teacher caught a glimpse of the animal loose without a hall pass ( "Anne Arundel's cruel cat policy," Sept.
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NEWS
September 12, 2009
Patricia Cursey It was her desire that her body be donated to the Anatomy Board of Maryland, it was her wishes not to have a memorial service. In lieu of flowers, she and her family request donations be made in her name to Alley Cat Allies at www.alleycat.org or call 1-866-271-5534 or your local Humane Society or Animal Rescue.
EXPLORE
January 31, 2012
Two cat advocacy groups are joining forces to offer a workshop in Laurel on the trap-neuter-return method of reducing feral cat populations, and other ways to humanely care for cats, Wednesday, Feb. 15 at 7 p.m. at the Laurel Municipal Pool meeting room, Main and Ninth streets. Alley Cat Allies, a national organization, will co-host the workshop with Laurel Cats, a local group of cat advocate volunteers, to present educational and hands-on training on humane programs for feral and stray cats.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | July 19, 2009
Thanks to a last-minute intervention by a mediator, a Northeast Baltimore church has agreed to allow cat advocates to continue feeding feral cats on church property. Because of the agreement, a protest at Northside Baptist Church set for Sunday morning has been canceled. Volunteers, part of a citywide trap-neuter-return program, have been feeding a colony of cats on the church's lot for two years. But a couple of weeks ago, the church ordered the cat tenders to dismantle the feeding station.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2011
National Feral Cat Day is October 16. Leading the observance/celebration is the Bethesda-based Alley Cat Allies. Leading up to that day there will be spay/neuter drives and community education workshops. But what stands out -- at least to us -- are some of the unexpected Feral Cat Day mementos that can be picked up at Alley Cat Allies' online gift shop. Sure, there are T-shirts. And yep, they've got the coffee mugs. But how about a shirt your dog can wear to express his support of the kitties?
EXPLORE
January 31, 2012
Two cat advocacy groups are joining forces to offer a workshop in Laurel on the trap-neuter-return method of reducing feral cat populations, and other ways to humanely care for cats, Wednesday, Feb. 15 at 7 p.m. at the Laurel Municipal Pool meeting room, Main and Ninth streets. Alley Cat Allies, a national organization, will co-host the workshop with Laurel Cats, a local group of cat advocate volunteers, to present educational and hands-on training on humane programs for feral and stray cats.
NEWS
August 10, 2011
While I am pleased that you have highlighted the issue of feral and stray cats ("Call of the wild can be deadly for stray cats," July 7), I am very disappointed that the article neglected to mention the only solution that works: TNR, trap-neuter-return. Various long-term studies have documented that trapping and killing or relocating feral cats does not work. A vacuum effect is created, and new unneutered cats move into the territory and breed to capacity. Decades of these policies have led only to population increases.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2010
The peace agreement that had held since last summer between a Baltimore church and a group that advocates for feral cats appears to have broken down, with the pastor saying he'll order a feeding station and two small shelters removed from the property. The Rev. Reginald Turner, pastor of Northside Baptist Church on East Northern Parkway, said members of the congregation met Sunday and decided to end the arrangement made last August with Alley Cat Allies, a national group based in Bethesda that had acted as mediator in a dispute between the church and several people who have been taking care of a group of cats that have lived for years in a wooded area behind the church.
NEWS
April 27, 2010
Managing feral cats is a challenging and complicated situation. To achieve success, a collaborative, long-term, sustainable approach is essential. The ASPCA® (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is disappointed to learn Northside Baptist Church is ending their arrangement with Alley Cat Allies, who was providing trap-neuter-return (TNR) services to manage feral cats on Church property. The Church's plan to remove the feeding station, shelters, and even cats because they "no longer want the cats on the property" will not stop strays from entering the property and re-establishing a feral colony.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2011
National Feral Cat Day is October 16. Leading the observance/celebration is the Bethesda-based Alley Cat Allies. Leading up to that day there will be spay/neuter drives and community education workshops. But what stands out -- at least to us -- are some of the unexpected Feral Cat Day mementos that can be picked up at Alley Cat Allies' online gift shop. Sure, there are T-shirts. And yep, they've got the coffee mugs. But how about a shirt your dog can wear to express his support of the kitties?
NEWS
August 10, 2011
While I am pleased that you have highlighted the issue of feral and stray cats ("Call of the wild can be deadly for stray cats," July 7), I am very disappointed that the article neglected to mention the only solution that works: TNR, trap-neuter-return. Various long-term studies have documented that trapping and killing or relocating feral cats does not work. A vacuum effect is created, and new unneutered cats move into the territory and breed to capacity. Decades of these policies have led only to population increases.
NEWS
April 27, 2010
Managing feral cats is a challenging and complicated situation. To achieve success, a collaborative, long-term, sustainable approach is essential. The ASPCA® (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is disappointed to learn Northside Baptist Church is ending their arrangement with Alley Cat Allies, who was providing trap-neuter-return (TNR) services to manage feral cats on Church property. The Church's plan to remove the feeding station, shelters, and even cats because they "no longer want the cats on the property" will not stop strays from entering the property and re-establishing a feral colony.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2010
The peace agreement that had held since last summer between a Baltimore church and a group that advocates for feral cats appears to have broken down, with the pastor saying he'll order a feeding station and two small shelters removed from the property. The Rev. Reginald Turner, pastor of Northside Baptist Church on East Northern Parkway, said members of the congregation met Sunday and decided to end the arrangement made last August with Alley Cat Allies, a national group based in Bethesda that had acted as mediator in a dispute between the church and several people who have been taking care of a group of cats that have lived for years in a wooded area behind the church.
NEWS
September 12, 2009
Patricia Cursey It was her desire that her body be donated to the Anatomy Board of Maryland, it was her wishes not to have a memorial service. In lieu of flowers, she and her family request donations be made in her name to Alley Cat Allies at www.alleycat.org or call 1-866-271-5534 or your local Humane Society or Animal Rescue.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | July 19, 2009
Thanks to a last-minute intervention by a mediator, a Northeast Baltimore church has agreed to allow cat advocates to continue feeding feral cats on church property. Because of the agreement, a protest at Northside Baptist Church set for Sunday morning has been canceled. Volunteers, part of a citywide trap-neuter-return program, have been feeding a colony of cats on the church's lot for two years. But a couple of weeks ago, the church ordered the cat tenders to dismantle the feeding station.
NEWS
September 26, 2014
In late August, Richard Henry Lee Elementary School in Glen Burnie had to close its doors because a feral cat had found its way into the building. In closing the school, officials demonstrated prudent concern for the health and well-being of students. Feral cat activists bemoaned the caution exercised by officials, charging that officials had reacted to the feral cat sighting with the severity of a bomb threat after a teacher caught a glimpse of the animal loose without a hall pass ( "Anne Arundel's cruel cat policy," Sept.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | November 19, 2007
A woman in Pigtown looks forward to her regular visitors: alley cats that come for their daily fix of food. A couple in Northwest Baltimore feed a stray they've named "old gray and white cat" and six to nine others. And a woman in Canton expects the six stray cats that meander into her backyard every afternoon, all of which she's trapped, spayed and neutered this year, along with 44 other stray cats within a five-block radius of her house. All stand to benefit from pending legislation, to be voted on by the City Council today, that would make it legal and easier for them to care for feral cats.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | November 19, 2007
A woman in Pigtown looks forward to her regular visitors: alley cats that come for their daily fix of food. A couple in Northwest Baltimore feed a stray they've named "old gray and white cat" and six to nine others. And a woman in Canton expects the six stray cats that meander into her backyard every afternoon, all of which she's trapped, spayed and neutered this year, along with 44 other stray cats within a five-block radius of her house. All stand to benefit from pending legislation, to be voted on by the City Council today, that would make it legal and easier for them to care for feral cats.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin T. Reid and Robin T. Reid,Special to the Sun | April 2, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Louise Holton often jokes that she never tells people how many cats she has. Because, in truth, the number is impossible to count. In the United States, there are the more than 60 million feral cats (semi-wild felines that have grown up without human contact), and Holton has taken responsibility for each one of them. The 58-year-old is the co-founder of Alley Cat Allies, a national nonprofit organization based in Washington. Working out of offices in the city's funky Adams-Morgan neighborhood, the 13-member staff answers some 500 calls a month, gives out advice on handling feral cats, and cares for some decidedly non-ferals that sleep on whatever lap is available.
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