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NEWS
October 20, 2010
As a mother and registered nurse, I was thrilled to see The Sun highlight recently the seriousness of food allergies, particularly among children ("Food allergies common, growing, study says," Oct. 19). Food allergies are very real and, as the article states, among the most common chronic diseases in America. Over 12 million Americans — and 1 in every 25 children — suffer from allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, milk, fish, shellfish, wheat and soy, exposure to which can lead to life-threatening anaphylaxis within seconds.
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NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and For The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
A plant shot up about 6 feet in our yard recently. I never saw flowers, but the seeds remind me of ragweed. The leaf is not lacy like ragweed, though. It looks more like a stork footprint. What am I dealing with? There is a bumper crop of ragweed this year, and you have a species known as giant ragweed (Ambrosia trifida), as opposed to common ragweed (Ambrosia artemissiifolia). Unfortunately, giant ragweed pollen causes highly allergic reactions, just like the more familiar species.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | April 27, 2012
Sneezing? Think you may be allergic to something? Some Rite Aid stores are planning to hold free allergy screening for the most common allergens on Saturday at selected stores from noon to 4 p.m. Spring is traditionally a busy allergy season so nurses will be on hand to administer Fluorescent Allergosorbent, or FAST, tests. Included allergens are eggs, mold, cats, wheat, mountain cedar, dust mites, milk, ragweed and grass. Stores offering the screenings include: +6838 Loch Raven Boulevard in Baltimore, 410-825-8900 +711 West 40th Street in Baltimore, 410-467-3343 +4380 Park Heights Ave. in Baltimore, 410-664-8644 +2043 Mondawmin Mall in Baltimore 410-523-6315 +250 West Chase Street in Baltimore, 410-752-4473 +2801 Foster Avenue in Baltimore, 410-732-0523 +5624 Baltimore National Pike in Baltimore 410-a719-7608 +29-31 Shipping Place in Baltimore 410-282-0020 +110 Mitchells Chance Road in Edgewater, 410-956-9411 +2633 Brandermill Blvd.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 14, 2014
Inner city kids appear to suffer more from food allergies than the general population, according to new research lead by Johns Hopkins Children's Center . Researchers had already found that kids in four large cities are more vulnerable to asthma and environmental allergies. The new findings, which were published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology , show 10 percent of the kids were allergic to milk, eggs or peanuts, the three most common food allergens. Just six percent of kids nationally are allergic to these foods, according to National Institute of Health estimates.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| April 16, 2013
Oh, that was a fun day about 10 years ago when we fed our infant son yogurt and then watched his face unexpectedly blow up like a red-spotted balloon. A few years and a few EpiPens later, he was allergy free and I could stop reading labels like a detective. But for families still dealing with allergies, these bracelets from Hope Paige might come in handy.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | March 25, 1992
He only explodes like that when his sinuses are unbearably painful.-- A former aide explaining Bill Clinton's occasional flashes of anger.In an effort to reinvigorate his campaign and seize the all-important allergy sufferers' vote, Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton yesterday detailed a long history of sinus problems that he said had made his life "a living hell -- especially in the spring."It hurts right here," said the Arkansas governor at a hastily called news conference, pointing to an area of his forehead above both eyebrows.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN; King Features Syndicate | September 27, 2001
Q. I have fig trees in my back yard, and they were especially fruitful this year. I love fresh figs, but lately I have been experiencing a scary reaction. My lips tingle, and my tongue swells up. Could this be a fig allergy? A. Food allergies can be serious. Those who are sensitive to nuts or shellfish might suffer life-threatening reactions to even the smallest exposure. Fruit allergy is usually less serious, but if your tongue swells it could interfere with breathing. Some people, especially those who are allergic to latex or tree and grass pollens, might also react to kiwi fruit, figs, papaya, passion fruit, bananas, peaches and nectarines, to name just a few. Numbness and tingling in the mouth or lips, itching and swelling are all red flags that shouldn't be ignored.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | August 4, 1995
Amy Windham peers at her tormentors, Thelma and Louise, who are lounging a few feet away, confined in a steel cage. "I have no sympathy for them," she says, between coughs.They ignore her, rubbing against each other and flicking their tails.Ms. Windham, a 27-year-old Baltimore resident, sits suffering in the cat room -- a fur-matted cubicle in a basement of Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She is one of a hardy group of volunteers helping researchers test new anti-allergy drugs for people who are allergic to cats.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 8, 1997
Johns Hopkins Allergy and Asthma Center in Baltimore is seeking high school students who are allergic to ragweed to take the SAT in an effort to determine the effects of allergy medications on SAT scores.Student scores on the test, which will be administered tomorrow, will not appear on their records unless they request it.Candidates must be at least 14 years old and have completed their freshman year of high school. They also must never have taken the SATs.Those interested should call 1-800-845-3942.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | May 5, 1993
In springtime, Dana Frank's thoughts turn to baseball, steroid nasal sprays and antihistamine eye drops. He keeps his windows shut on many balmy nights, and powers up his car's air conditioning even when it isn't sticky outside.Like thousands of other Americans, the Baltimore physician suffers from a severe allergy to tree pollen. In late April and early May, when the oaks and ashes and alders get frisky, Dr. Frank feels miserable."Particularly in the early morning and late afternoon, I have very itchy eyes, painful eyes, sneezing, runny nose," he said yesterday.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
The winter was cold and snowy and the spring has been wet and warm, and that combination has made it easier for trees to produce much more pollen than normal. And that means runny noses and red, watery eyes for many who suffer from allergies. But Dr. Gregory Small, board-certified in internal medicine and a primary care physician at Greater Baltimore Medical Center at Texas Station, says that there are a number of ways to treat these allergies. What are the main spring allergens and symptoms?
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
Orioles reliever Brian Matusz remembers laughing when he opened the piece of fan mail in Sarasota, Fla., last month. He immediately showed the contents of the manila envelope to Orioles head athletic trainer Richie Bancells before informing manager Buck Showalter. "I'm like, Richie, can you believe this?' Then I told Buck about it," Matusz said recently, chuckling. "That's probably the most unusual, interesting item any fan has ever asked me to sign. I thought it was hilarious.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
The beginning of the school year is a time when allergy symptoms in children may flare up. Dr. Manav Singla, a specialist at the Asthma Allergy & Sinus Center in Baltimore, said the change in fall temperature, allergens and environment during this time can trigger an increase in mucus production as well as increased inflammation in the large and small airways of the lungs. He talks about how parents can help their children manage asthma symptoms. What is asthma and what are the symptoms?
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| September 5, 2013
A friend told me about a home allergy swab test for pets. She says I can swab my pet's mouth, send the swab to a company, and find out what he's allergic to, instead of going to an animal allergist. It sounds too good to be true. Are these tests any good? Swab tests and blood tests have been shown to be inaccurate in diagnosing pets' allergies. If you think your pet might be suffering from allergies, the first step is to visit your veterinarian for a full evaluation to rule out other problems such as bacterial and fungal infections, skin mites, ringworm , fleas, or more serious diseases.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
Ragweed season is upon us, pollen counts show, and is expected to peak over the next couple of weeks. The fall allergen had a count of 64 grains per cubic meter of air on Wednesday, a high level, according to the office of Drs. Golden and Matz LLC in Owings Mills. Ragweed blooms starting in August and through November and causes what is commonly known as hay fever, marked by  sneezing, congestion, itchy throat or ears, hives, and swollen eyelids and itchy eyes. AccuWeather forecasts this year's ragweed season to be "normal" in the mid-Atlantic but particularly bad across parts of the Southeast and Midwest because of heavy rains this summer prompting more ragweed growth.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2013
Steven Mangold and Christian Hwang were diagnosed with severe cow's milk allergies as young boys. Both initially fared well after months of experimental treatment at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center that exposed them gradually to more and more milk. Nearly three years later, Steven is still doing well. He can consume unlimited amounts of milk or dairy without a problem. The soon-to-be 11-year-old counts ice cream and tacos among his favorite foods. But Christian, who's 16, relapsed within a year of finishing his treatment in 2008 and has chosen to back away from milk, though he can tolerate it as an ingredient in cooked foods.
FEATURES
By Linda Shrieves and Linda Shrieves,Orlando Sentinel | December 6, 2007
What's green and festive and makes you sneeze? It might be your Christmas tree. Allergists have long suspected that live Christmas trees are the culprits behind some folks' runny, itchy noses during the holidays -- and now one doctor believes he has proof. "I've been in practice for 30 years and, every year, between Christmas and New Year, we have everybody come in with recurring sinus infections," said Dr. John Santilli, a Connecticut allergy specialist. "We tell them, `Take down the tree,' but we never had the proof to show them."
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | October 23, 1990
Is there a cloud behind our silver linings?In a recent study, Canadian scientists put "silver" fillings, which are half mercury and half silver-tin alloy, in young sheep, which showed signs of kidney failure within months. The scientists thought the mercury might be to blame.Mercury makes fillings pliable and hardens to a high state of durability. But it's toxic in high doses.Scientists have known for some time that small amounts of mercury leach out of fillings. But whether that adds up to human fTC risk is still unknown.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| April 16, 2013
Oh, that was a fun day about 10 years ago when we fed our infant son yogurt and then watched his face unexpectedly blow up like a red-spotted balloon. A few years and a few EpiPens later, he was allergy free and I could stop reading labels like a detective. But for families still dealing with allergies, these bracelets from Hope Paige might come in handy.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Taking drops of allergens under the tongue can be an effective alternative to allergy shots for preventing coughing, wheezing and chest tightness common this time of year among allergy sufferers, according to a Johns Hopkins doctor's review of dozens of published studies. The report, published on the Journal of the American Medical Association's website Wednesday, summarizes 63 studies and makes a case for what is known as sublingual immunotherapy. The treatment is popular in Europe but is less common in the United States.
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