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By Scott Timberg and Scott Timberg,Contributing Writer | April 16, 1994
The best moments in "The Life and Times of Allen Ginsberg" are the unlikeliest.In a battered brown jacket, jeans and a long, black beard, Mr. Ginsberg sits across from William F. Buckley, clean-shaven and wearing a thin-lapeled blue suit. Mr. Buckley tosses a question to the poet, and Mr. Ginsberg quickly announces that he'd prefer to read a poem.He brags that he wrote the poem on LSD. Mr. Buckley tries to maintain his composure. "Under the influence?" he asks, incredulous. Mr. Ginsberg concedes that it is so. As he reads, Mr. Buckley nods, smile and charm intact.
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By Karmen Fox and For The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
What's in the box? One of my biggest complaints with Season 6 was the unresolved plotline with Michael Ginsberg's crumbling mental stability. That answer arrived in a box in "The Runaways. " I almost wish it hadn't. Ginsy waltzing into Peggy's office with that plain white box was a less gritty version of the climatic scene in "Se7en. " Just like Kevin's Spacey's character, Ginsy was eerily calm and collected - an odd disposition after spewing manic racing thoughts and pouncing on Peggy just the night before.
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By Andrei Codrescu | April 9, 1997
NEW ORLEANS -- Alan Ginsberg, old courage teacher, is gone. I met Allen in 1966 when I was 19 years old, fresh out of Romania. I knocked on his door in the Lower East Side in New York and brashly presented my baby-dissident credentials to the President of Poetry.Far from being startled, the poet gave generously of his time and made me welcome to the language, the country and New York. We spoke French because my English was nonexistent, and he loaded me with books of poetry he thought I should read and study.
NEWS
By Arthur J. Magida | April 13, 1997
FOR A KID growing up in Scranton, Pa., there was nothing like these two literary devils. They rode into America of the mid-and late 1950s with a verve, a courage, an energy and honesty that was bracing, courageous, intoxicating, exciting and totally, honestly new. Nothing had been seen like them before. Nothing has been seen since. For wiry kids like me, growing up in towns whose only "bookstores" stocked five racks of paperbacks at the rear of a shop that sold cards and 45 rpm records, Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac were spirits from another world, another universe.
NEWS
April 10, 1997
Only a few people are showered with attention almost every day: athletes, actors, politicians, victims of crimes.Poets are rarely in that circle of bright light.Two events within the past week -- one a tragedy, the other a celebration of talent -- are reminders that poetry endures even in shadow, that poems can alter how people think.Allen Ginsberg, the best-known poet of his generation and a figure who helped define it, died Saturday at the age of 70. He was hipster, profane buddha, secular rabbi -- the keeper of the beat of the Beats.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 10, 1993
It used to be that writing an unauthorized biography was fairl easy work, requiring little more than a box of press clippings and access to a few ex-toadies eager to dish the dirt on their former employer. Just add hype and stir: instant bio.Today's scandal-mongers need something more, though. They need an angle -- something juicy enough to get mentioned by the gossip columnists, and nasty enough to titillate even the most jaded fan.Finding that angle can be a real challenge when the subject of your sleaze-ography is someone as notorious as Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger.
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By William Robertson and William Robertson,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 30, 1992
It is hard to believe that Allen Ginsberg, who helped create the Beat Generation and lived to tell about it, is 66.Known more for fast lives than literary endeavor, the socially and culturally rebellious Beat poets and novelists who came of age in the late 1940s and '50s were not supposed to last this long.Of them, Neal Cassady, the model for Dean Moriarty in the Beat anthem, "On the Road," was found dead at 41 beside a railroad track in Mexico in 1968; alcohol and drug abuse were blamed.
NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE Title: "Chesapeake Song" Author: Brenda Lane Richardson Publisher: Amistad Press Length, price: 371 pages, $19.95 | December 26, 1993
Title: "O Little Town of Maggody"Editor: Joan HessPublisher: DuttonLength, price: 245 pages, $19 Bill Clinton may be Arkansas' favorite son, but in tiny Maggody (pop. 755), the setting for Joan Hess' madcap-mystery series, the big hometown hero is country crooner Matt Montana. Matt's handlers decide to send their superstar home for the holidays in order to combat his growing reputation as Nashville's bad boy."Let the media see him surrounded by his kinfolk, decorating the Christmas tree, singing carols in the high school gym, and reminiscing about his beloved granny," his manager schemes.
NEWS
By Mark Miller | March 13, 1997
(with apologies to Allen Ginsberg)I saw the best minds of my generation transformed by Cybertech, wired hysterical online plugged-in,prowling the highways, backroads and alleys of cyberspace at all hours looking for misadventure or a pithy chat,angelheaded nerds, soccer moms, corporate execs, sports authorities, catty secretaries, et al., hungry for the impersonal connection to the impersonal masses out in the impersonal vastness of cyber night,who red...
NEWS
By Arthur J. Magida | April 13, 1997
FOR A KID growing up in Scranton, Pa., there was nothing like these two literary devils. They rode into America of the mid-and late 1950s with a verve, a courage, an energy and honesty that was bracing, courageous, intoxicating, exciting and totally, honestly new. Nothing had been seen like them before. Nothing has been seen since. For wiry kids like me, growing up in towns whose only "bookstores" stocked five racks of paperbacks at the rear of a shop that sold cards and 45 rpm records, Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac were spirits from another world, another universe.
NEWS
April 10, 1997
Only a few people are showered with attention almost every day: athletes, actors, politicians, victims of crimes.Poets are rarely in that circle of bright light.Two events within the past week -- one a tragedy, the other a celebration of talent -- are reminders that poetry endures even in shadow, that poems can alter how people think.Allen Ginsberg, the best-known poet of his generation and a figure who helped define it, died Saturday at the age of 70. He was hipster, profane buddha, secular rabbi -- the keeper of the beat of the Beats.
NEWS
By Andrei Codrescu | April 9, 1997
NEW ORLEANS -- Alan Ginsberg, old courage teacher, is gone. I met Allen in 1966 when I was 19 years old, fresh out of Romania. I knocked on his door in the Lower East Side in New York and brashly presented my baby-dissident credentials to the President of Poetry.Far from being startled, the poet gave generously of his time and made me welcome to the language, the country and New York. We spoke French because my English was nonexistent, and he loaded me with books of poetry he thought I should read and study.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 1997
NEW YORK -- Allen Ginsberg, the poet laureate of the Beat generation whose "Howl!" became a manifesto for the sexual revolution and a cause celebre for free speech in the 1950s, died early yesterday. He was 70 and lived in Manhattan.He died of liver cancer, said Bill Morgan, the poet's friend and archivist.Mr. Morgan said that Mr. Ginsberg wrote right to the end. "He's working on a lot of poems, talking to old friends," Mr. Morgan said Friday. "He's in very good spirits. He wants to write poetry and finish his life's work."
NEWS
By Mark Miller | March 13, 1997
(with apologies to Allen Ginsberg)I saw the best minds of my generation transformed by Cybertech, wired hysterical online plugged-in,prowling the highways, backroads and alleys of cyberspace at all hours looking for misadventure or a pithy chat,angelheaded nerds, soccer moms, corporate execs, sports authorities, catty secretaries, et al., hungry for the impersonal connection to the impersonal masses out in the impersonal vastness of cyber night,who red...
NEWS
By Diane Scharper | December 27, 1995
A prophet covered in blood,a baby howling warningsin the dead of winterto frightened ignorant villagerswho stifle its criesfor fear of murderous soldiers.That is what they call Christmas.E9 --From ''The Interior Prisoner,'' by Geoffrey O'BrienACCORDING TO Geoffrey O'Brien, this poem began to write itself in a dream. He had been reading Charles Dickens one winter from a prison cell. On waking he began writing down what he had heard. For the next several weeks, as he thought about his dream, lines ''made their way forward,'' becoming this poem.
FEATURES
By Scott Timberg and Scott Timberg,Contributing Writer | April 16, 1994
The best moments in "The Life and Times of Allen Ginsberg" are the unlikeliest.In a battered brown jacket, jeans and a long, black beard, Mr. Ginsberg sits across from William F. Buckley, clean-shaven and wearing a thin-lapeled blue suit. Mr. Buckley tosses a question to the poet, and Mr. Ginsberg quickly announces that he'd prefer to read a poem.He brags that he wrote the poem on LSD. Mr. Buckley tries to maintain his composure. "Under the influence?" he asks, incredulous. Mr. Ginsberg concedes that it is so. As he reads, Mr. Buckley nods, smile and charm intact.
NEWS
By Christopher Corbett | March 1, 1992
THE PORTABLE BEAT READER.Edited by Ann Charters.Viking.635 pages. $25.Shortly before Christmas 1946, Neal Cassady, freshly discharged from the New Mexico State Reformatory, but apparently unreformed, departed Sidney, Neb., with a stolen car, hTC a 16-year-old child bride and $300 of her aunt's money.This cross-country jaunt (car abandoned in Nebraska snow drift . . . trip continued via Greyhound) would end in New York City. There, in a cold-water flat, Mr. Cassady would meet Jack Kerouac (and later Allen Ginsberg)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 1997
NEW YORK -- Allen Ginsberg, the poet laureate of the Beat generation whose "Howl!" became a manifesto for the sexual revolution and a cause celebre for free speech in the 1950s, died early yesterday. He was 70 and lived in Manhattan.He died of liver cancer, said Bill Morgan, the poet's friend and archivist.Mr. Morgan said that Mr. Ginsberg wrote right to the end. "He's working on a lot of poems, talking to old friends," Mr. Morgan said Friday. "He's in very good spirits. He wants to write poetry and finish his life's work."
NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE Title: "Chesapeake Song" Author: Brenda Lane Richardson Publisher: Amistad Press Length, price: 371 pages, $19.95 | December 26, 1993
Title: "O Little Town of Maggody"Editor: Joan HessPublisher: DuttonLength, price: 245 pages, $19 Bill Clinton may be Arkansas' favorite son, but in tiny Maggody (pop. 755), the setting for Joan Hess' madcap-mystery series, the big hometown hero is country crooner Matt Montana. Matt's handlers decide to send their superstar home for the holidays in order to combat his growing reputation as Nashville's bad boy."Let the media see him surrounded by his kinfolk, decorating the Christmas tree, singing carols in the high school gym, and reminiscing about his beloved granny," his manager schemes.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 10, 1993
It used to be that writing an unauthorized biography was fairl easy work, requiring little more than a box of press clippings and access to a few ex-toadies eager to dish the dirt on their former employer. Just add hype and stir: instant bio.Today's scandal-mongers need something more, though. They need an angle -- something juicy enough to get mentioned by the gossip columnists, and nasty enough to titillate even the most jaded fan.Finding that angle can be a real challenge when the subject of your sleaze-ography is someone as notorious as Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger.
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