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By Chicago Tribune | October 8, 1992
CHICAGO -- Allan Bloom, the University of Chicago professor who wrote the highly acclaimed 1987 book "The Closing of the American Mind: How Higher Education Has Failed Democracy and Impoverished the Souls of Today's Students," has died.Dr. Bloom, who was 62, died yesterday at the university's Bernard Mitchell Hospital. The cause of death, according to school officials, was peptic ulcer bleeding, complicated by liver failure.His friend Saul Bellow, the Nobel Prize-winning author, said of him: "Allan Bloom was a true teacher, by which I mean he believed it to be monstrous that any of us should lose our souls through ignorance.
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NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,special to the sun | August 3, 1997
President Clinton hoists the banner of Education! Sports pundits regularly chastise athletes who bypass college for the NBA. Yet amid the culture wars and canon wars, theory wars and education wars besieging universities, there's a crisis in the classroom where Johnny can't read, can't think, can't write, and has yet to discover history.As Frank Kermode, a literary critic, remarked during a University of Chicago symposium marking the 10th anniversary of Allan Bloom's landmark study "The Closing of the American Mind," "We should get back to teaching students to read."
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NEWS
By D. Keith Mano and D. Keith Mano,Los Angeles Times | July 18, 1993
LOVE AND FRIENDSHIPAllan BloomSimon & Schuster551 pages, $25Eroticism in the '90s is passionless and approximate. So says Allan Bloom in "Love and Friendship." The most vulgar four-letter word has become an overused comma. Worse yet, contemporary sexual "interfacing" cannot empower art. ("Did Romeo and Juliet have a relationship?" Bloom asks.) Adultery, for Jane Austen, held terrific human resonance. Adultery today is . . . oh, self-expression. Political correctness and the dull relativism implicit in it have produced "an unwillingness to think about one's experience and its relationship to the whole of life and the moral order."
NEWS
By D. Keith Mano and D. Keith Mano,Los Angeles Times | July 18, 1993
LOVE AND FRIENDSHIPAllan BloomSimon & Schuster551 pages, $25Eroticism in the '90s is passionless and approximate. So says Allan Bloom in "Love and Friendship." The most vulgar four-letter word has become an overused comma. Worse yet, contemporary sexual "interfacing" cannot empower art. ("Did Romeo and Juliet have a relationship?" Bloom asks.) Adultery, for Jane Austen, held terrific human resonance. Adultery today is . . . oh, self-expression. Political correctness and the dull relativism implicit in it have produced "an unwillingness to think about one's experience and its relationship to the whole of life and the moral order."
NEWS
October 9, 1992
Allan BloomWrote a best-sellerAllan Bloom, whose 1987 best seller "The Closing of the American Mind" attacked academic faddism on American college campuses and shaped the debate over political correctness in the classroom, has died at 62.The University of Chicago professor of political philosophy died Wednesday of peptic ulcer bleeding complicated by liver failure.His book, subtitled "How Higher Education Has Failed Democracy and Impoverished the Souls of Today's Students," challenged universities to return to a more traditional curriculum based on the classics of Western literature.
FEATURES
By JEFFREY M. LANDAW | January 6, 1991
Giants and Dwarfs: Essays 1960-1990.Allan Bloom.Simon & Schuster.395 pages. $22.95. A few years ago, a Baltimore columnist with no sociopolitical ax to grind and views far removed from Allan Bloom's remarked that when Americans of a certain age and class first meet one another, they always wind up talking about popular music and old television shows because that's the only common culture they're sure of having. Enough other people had noticed that fact, and found it shameful or even dangerous, to explain why Mr. Bloom's "The Closing of the American Mind" became one of the surprise best-sellers of 1987: A large public was waiting for it.The most Mr. Bloom can hope for with "Giants and Dwarfs" probably will be critical success.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,special to the sun | August 3, 1997
President Clinton hoists the banner of Education! Sports pundits regularly chastise athletes who bypass college for the NBA. Yet amid the culture wars and canon wars, theory wars and education wars besieging universities, there's a crisis in the classroom where Johnny can't read, can't think, can't write, and has yet to discover history.As Frank Kermode, a literary critic, remarked during a University of Chicago symposium marking the 10th anniversary of Allan Bloom's landmark study "The Closing of the American Mind," "We should get back to teaching students to read."
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | December 10, 1991
People who deplore declining standards of education are usually right. That is why you find that lament almost anywhere you look in history. I heard it in the 1940s, when Greek and Latin were being discontinued even in prep schools that had made a cult of the classics. The lament was true then, and is even truer now, when comparative scores show American schools sinking below the achievements of other countries. The fight for standards must be unceasing.But in America we have other concerns as well, reflected in the vast numbers being carried higher and higher in the educational network.
NEWS
By Alan Eade | December 20, 1991
ROBERT H. Chambers, president of Western Maryland College, would have us believe that Secretary of Education Lamar Alexander' criticism of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools is misguided (Other Voices, Nov. 26).According to Chambers, the association's "diversity standard" is anything but "a call for quotas," while "political correctness" (whatever that means) is the farthest thing from the minds of the responsible men and women who take seriously their task of evaluating our colleges and universities.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | April 12, 1993
Chicago -- The heroes -- that is what they have become -- of the ''Spur Posse'' club in California have a proper regard for their own importance. They want to be paid to appear on TV. They have been getting their fee from local stations. When the ''Today'' show would not fork over, the heroes passed it up.These heroes are teen-age boys whose accomplishment is to tabulate accurately their busy intercourse with teen-age or sub-teen girls. For this they have been lionized by their school-mates.
NEWS
October 9, 1992
Allan BloomWrote a best-sellerAllan Bloom, whose 1987 best seller "The Closing of the American Mind" attacked academic faddism on American college campuses and shaped the debate over political correctness in the classroom, has died at 62.The University of Chicago professor of political philosophy died Wednesday of peptic ulcer bleeding complicated by liver failure.His book, subtitled "How Higher Education Has Failed Democracy and Impoverished the Souls of Today's Students," challenged universities to return to a more traditional curriculum based on the classics of Western literature.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | October 8, 1992
CHICAGO -- Allan Bloom, the University of Chicago professor who wrote the highly acclaimed 1987 book "The Closing of the American Mind: How Higher Education Has Failed Democracy and Impoverished the Souls of Today's Students," has died.Dr. Bloom, who was 62, died yesterday at the university's Bernard Mitchell Hospital. The cause of death, according to school officials, was peptic ulcer bleeding, complicated by liver failure.His friend Saul Bellow, the Nobel Prize-winning author, said of him: "Allan Bloom was a true teacher, by which I mean he believed it to be monstrous that any of us should lose our souls through ignorance.
FEATURES
By JEFFREY M. LANDAW | January 6, 1991
Giants and Dwarfs: Essays 1960-1990.Allan Bloom.Simon & Schuster.395 pages. $22.95. A few years ago, a Baltimore columnist with no sociopolitical ax to grind and views far removed from Allan Bloom's remarked that when Americans of a certain age and class first meet one another, they always wind up talking about popular music and old television shows because that's the only common culture they're sure of having. Enough other people had noticed that fact, and found it shameful or even dangerous, to explain why Mr. Bloom's "The Closing of the American Mind" became one of the surprise best-sellers of 1987: A large public was waiting for it.The most Mr. Bloom can hope for with "Giants and Dwarfs" probably will be critical success.
NEWS
By CARLIN ROMANO and CARLIN ROMANO,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | June 4, 2006
WASHINGTON -- If a handful of editors and marketing people make a right turn at a big publishing convention and no one hears it, did they make a peep? Hardly. On a recent Saturday afternoon at the huge new Convention Center here, filled to capacity by that massive annual trade show of the book business called BEA (BookExpo America), a group of conservative editors and sales execs took a chance. They gathered in their chosen venue, Room 203AB, for a panel on "Selling and Promoting Right of Center Books Via Left of Center Channels."
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | August 19, 2007
The Politics of Heaven America in Fearful Times By Earl Shorris W.W. Norton & Co. / 352 pages / $25.95 A new movement - "the most powerful political movement on earth" - holds sway in the United States, according to Earl Shorris, a freelance writer and founder of the Clemente Course in the Humanities. Without a name or a leader, the movement preys on the fear of death, which became "a national mania" in response to the Holocaust, nuclear weapons and terrorism. Bound together by a belief in Armageddon and the search for an alternative to extinction - "a loophole" - members of the movement "do not know what they oppose in general."
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