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SPORTS
By Milton Kent | January 7, 1997
Random thoughts and observations from a long winter's vacation: After about a month of head-to-head competition, about the only thing the two new all-sports news networks, CNN/SI and ESPNEWS, have in common is the relative xTC blandness of their on-air personnel.None of the new anchors on either network has displayed a lot of charisma, and the ESPNEWS correspondents seem to go out of their way to not make waves. CNN/SI's Inga Hammond, however, has the kind of telegenic appeal that could make her that network's breakout star.
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BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2013
The University of Maryland football players and coaches didn't know what kind of reception they'd get as their buses arrived at Middletown High School - surrounded by mountains, 50 miles northwest of College Park - for a scrimmage on a sunny Saturday near the end of spring practices in April. They hoped that Frederick County was full of Terps fans, but they hadn't scrimmaged here before. They were pleased to find the parking lot nearly full and the scoreboard flashing "Welcome Maryland Football!"
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SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | November 8, 1991
"Good morning. You're listening to Baltimore's WMSH, Meshuggeh Radio, the station that's crazy about sports."In a few moments, we'll have the first traffic report from our SportsCopter with Stan White at the controls. Later on, it'll be commentary from Charley Eckman, speaking on sports as a reflection of our culture. At 10, it's sports talk with Art Sinclair, followed at noon by "Lunch with Mike," as The Sun's Mike Littwin discusses smart baseball with Orioles base-running coach Lonnie Smith.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case | May 29, 2013
Last Wednesday, as New York Yankees pitcher Hiroki Kuroda pitched to the Orioles' lineup, All Stars Sports Bar failed to live up to its name. The downtown bar, located to the right of the gentleman's club The Goddess and 1/8 of a mile from Camden Yards, looked the part at first glance: There was a long bar with more than 15 seats, three mounted flatscreen TVs above the bar and framed Ravens posters lining the walls. But after a few blinks, the problems became apparent. Before going any further, let's make this point clear: My expectations were not of a jam-packed bar such as Pickles Pub or even Pratt Street Ale House, an underrated spot to watch a game.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | June 30, 1998
Starting Aug. 3, Baltimore will join the rest of the nation, getting its own all-sports radio station.Nestor Aparicio, host of an afternoon drive time sports talk show on WWLG (1360 AM), has reached an agreement to purchase time on and program WKDB (1570 AM) with an all-sports format.Aparicio, who will have a show on the station from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., said he is hoping to re-title the station WNST, pending FCC approval, in keeping with his on-air "nasty" persona.While the new format will not operate until Aug. 3, tapes of Aparicio's WWLG show can be heard on WKDB until then.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
On the one-year anniversary for the station he operates, WNST-AM talk show host "Nasty" Nestor Aparicio broke the news to his listeners yesterday afternoon: Baltimore's first all-sports format will be ending Sept. 30.Aparicio declined an option in his lease to buy the station's license outright, and it was sold to Chicago-based Catholic Radio Networks for a reported $1.5 million late last week.The news was bittersweet for Aparicio, who plans a move to a 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. show on WCBM (680 AM)
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN SPORTS MEDIA CRITIC | May 17, 2000
On the surface, the Timonium studio of OnAirSports.com looks like one of a hundred all-sports radio stations across the country, albeit a bit smaller. At any given time during the day, there's a guy wearing a headset talking sports on one side of a booth, with a producer manning the controls on the other side. And the conversation, on one May morning, is right off the standard sports-talk menu, with host Mark Mussina talking about the Orioles, the previous night's NBA playoff action and the talents of B-movie actress Shannon Tweed.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1998
Nick from Abingdon wants to talk Ravens, maybe offer a few suggestions for the Orioles. He's maneuvering through early-morning traffic, usually the wrong place and time to satisfy a sports jones. But with a flip of his cell phone, his opinions are spewed over the airwaves between gulps of coffee.For listeners of WKDB, this sort of jock chatter is music to the ears.Most recently a children's network station, 1570-AM was given a drastic makeover by Nestor Aparicio, the 30-year-old Dundalk native with the sharp tongue and grand visions.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | March 5, 1996
The last domino has fallen and cable-subscribing baseball fans all across the Baltimore region will be able to see the Orioles without paying premium fees.That's because TCI Communications, the city's cable franchiser, will make the Home Team Sports signal a part of its expanded basic package, beginning April 1, which just happens to be Opening Day.Officials at TCI deferred comment to an official announcement later in the month, though subscribers should receive official notice in their March billings.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | September 19, 1992
It all started with the telephone ringing late one evening not long ago, just when Joe Friday was getting ready to bust a hippie on "Dragnet."I considered not answering. My house is the same as your house. Any time you answer the phone, you stand a 50 percent chance of being violated by a taped sales message or a smarmy cold caller peddling slow-moving show tickets, rural condos or uninteresting magazines. (Warning: If you ever buy a theater ticket, just one, you get bombed for years.)What can I say?
NEWS
March 19, 2013
The elimination of the men's baseball and soccer programs at Towson State University is a tough pill to swallow ("Towson president: Cutbacks of baseball, soccer painful but necessary," March 15). It is a great disappointment to fans, the administration, friends of the university and the athletes in these two programs. Yet it is the only viable option if Towson is to comply with Title IX. Athletic Director Mike Waddell spent a year studying alternatives to cutting the two sports. University President Maravene Loeschke then appointed a task force to review his recommendations.
SPORTS
By Jon Fogg and The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2012
Among the most talked about stories in college lacrosse in 2012, perhaps none was bigger than the recruiting of high school underclassmen. Nearly three years after the first recorded oral commitment by a sophomore, Johns Hopkins made history by accepting the first such commitment from a freshman - attackman Forry Smith of Haverford School in Havertown, Pa. Two more commitments from fellow members of the Class of 2016 soon followed....
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
Maybe the best way to cut through all the spin and counterspin on the Olympics is this: Last week, NBC was saying it would lose money on the Olympics. Yesterday, it said it might break even. Today, the network is saying it could turn a profit on the $1.18 billion investment. "Yeah, we think there's a small chance, a chance we could make a little bit of money over the next couple of weeks," Mark Lazarus, chairman of the NBC Sports Group, said in a conference call from London Thursday when asked if the network might turn a profit on the games.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
It all caught up with University of Maryland swimmers and divers, men's cross country runners, women's water polo players and other athletes young enough to have rarely confronted limits on their talents and dreams. All of the team members had faced losing before. That's part of competition. But by Saturday - the date Maryland set long ago to officially eliminate teams absent an infusion of private funds - many of the athletes had been overtaken by a deeper sort of pain and disappointment.
NEWS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,bill.ordine@baltsun.com | April 28, 2009
With a short drive, Marylanders could be legally betting on Ravens games when the NFL season begins in September - assuming Delaware Gov. Jack Markell and lawmakers push through sports wagering legislation, the first of its kind on the East Coast. Delaware's legislature will consider allowing wagering on all sports when its session resumes today. While there is agreement among the governor, key legislators and the state's gambling interests on the broad issue of sports betting, making it a reality bogged down early in the session over the details.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | September 5, 2008
Reaching into the locker and taking the notebook out of the backpack as we go back to school with this week's sports media notes: * As of Monday, Baltimore will have one more all-sports radio station than it has professional teams. WVIE (1370 AM) joins ESPN 1300 and WNST (1570 AM) as the third sports yakker, coming online at 6 a.m. as a Fox Sports Radio affiliate. The station, formerly WLG and now to be known as Fox 1370 Sports Radio, will carry a mostly syndicated lineup, though it has hired former WBAL voice Jerry Coleman as its sports director and a talk show host.
NEWS
March 19, 2013
The elimination of the men's baseball and soccer programs at Towson State University is a tough pill to swallow ("Towson president: Cutbacks of baseball, soccer painful but necessary," March 15). It is a great disappointment to fans, the administration, friends of the university and the athletes in these two programs. Yet it is the only viable option if Towson is to comply with Title IX. Athletic Director Mike Waddell spent a year studying alternatives to cutting the two sports. University President Maravene Loeschke then appointed a task force to review his recommendations.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | March 20, 1997
Sports talk show hosts with brains (and that could narrow the field considerably) are casting an interested eye on a matter in Philadelphia that has potentially serious ramifications for anyone behind a microphone.The Flyers have filed a libel suit against WIP-AM, the team's radio carrier and an all-sports station, to boot, for broadcasting a story that star center Eric Lindros missed a recent game because he was hung over. Lindros and the team vigorously deny the story, and say the station acted irresponsibly in airing it.It's not the first time the station and the team have crossed swords over allegedly erroneous reports.
NEWS
By Sarah Merkey and Sarah Merkey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2005
After Chris Carter met professional bowler Parker Bohn III last year, his star-struck mother, Ginny Carter, told him not to wash. After all, he had just shaken hands with one of the biggest names in bowling. "I don't think that before that day they knew what it meant to play with Parker Bohn," she said of Chris, 16, and his brother, Kyle, 18. The Freeland residents were looking forward to mixing with some of bowling's top stars again this weekend at the Professional Bowlers Association Wild Turkey Bourbon East Region tournament at Forest Hill Lanes.
SPORTS
August 13, 2004
Archery When: Aug. 18-21. Top U.S. performers: Butch Johnson, Vic Wunderle, Janet Dykman. U.S. chances: U.S. men are well-seasoned at the elite level, winning team medals in three of the past four Olympics. U.S. women have won only one medal since 1976. Outlook: South Korea's men and women dominate the competition. - Hartford Courant Badminton When: Aug. 14-21. Top U.S. performers: The doubles team of Howard Bach and Kevin Han, the only U.S. players to qualify for Athens. U.S. chances: No U.S. Olympian has advanced beyond the second round since badminton joined the Games in 1992.
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