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By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens | March 1, 1995
For a warm-from-the-oven brunch or breakfast bread, bake this handy, heart-healthy coffeecake. You probably have most of the ingredients on your shelves already. Applesauce takes over the role of cooking oil, making the cinnamony bread moist and tender.And, to lower the cholesterol, you use egg substitute in place of the eggs.Spiced Apple CoffeecakeServes 10Nonstick spray coating2/3 cup all-purpose flour1/2 cup whole-wheat flour1 teaspoon baking soda1 teaspoon ground cinnamon1/4 teaspoon salt1 1/2 cups peeled, cored and finely chopped apple (2 large)
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By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | August 20, 2008
Help! I forgot to wear my glasses and came home with 5 pounds of self-rising flour instead of all-purpose flour. What can I do with it? And why do grocery stores in the South devote so much shelf space to self-rising flour? The reason you see so much self-rising flour in the South is tradition. Self-rising flour is convenient for making biscuits, saving you a step in adding baking powder. So that's one thing you can do with your self-rising flour - make biscuits with it. You also can use it in recipes that call for baking powder, such as quick breads and some cookies.
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NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | August 20, 2008
Help! I forgot to wear my glasses and came home with 5 pounds of self-rising flour instead of all-purpose flour. What can I do with it? And why do grocery stores in the South devote so much shelf space to self-rising flour? The reason you see so much self-rising flour in the South is tradition. Self-rising flour is convenient for making biscuits, saving you a step in adding baking powder. So that's one thing you can do with your self-rising flour - make biscuits with it. You also can use it in recipes that call for baking powder, such as quick breads and some cookies.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | December 26, 2007
There's a lot of hoity-toity food around these days, and we like a lot of it. On the other hand, there is much to be said for voluntary simplicity. Consider the good, old-fashioned Yankee pot roast. Here it is, a meal (almost) in a pot. The pot roast includes a little cider vinegar to tenderize the beef and add a teensy tang. Robin Mather Jenkins writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Old-Fashioned Pot Roast Makes 8 servings -- Total time: 8 hours and 15 minutes 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt freshly ground pepper 1 beef chuck roast, 2 1/2 to 3 pounds, trimmed 3 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 cup beef or chicken broth 2 tablespoons quick-mixing flour, such as Wondra 8 red potatoes, halved 8 small carrots 2 yellow onions, quartered 1/3 cup apple-cider vinegar Combine the all-purpose flour, salt and pepper to taste in a large resealable plastic bag. Add the meat; seal.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | February 23, 1994
Q: Nutmeg and mace seem similar to me. Are they related, and can they be substituted for each other?A: Nutmeg and mace are similar and are even from the same fruit of the nutmeg tree. Nutmeg is the fruit's oval-shaped pit and mace is the bright red webbing that surrounds the shell of the pit. The pit, nutmeg, can be left whole and freshly grated or packaged already ground. Mace is removed, dried and ground. At that point, it turns a rust color. The two spices can be interchanged but nutmeg does have a sweeter and more delicate aroma and taste than mace.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | May 4, 1994
Q: How can you tell if exotic oils go bad? I store oils such as safflower, sesame and peanut in a cool, dark place but I worry that they will turn.A: There will be no doubt if specialty oils go bad because they'll give off a rancid smell that is very obvious. For prolonged shelf life it's best to store these oils in the refrigerator. If they become cloudy, the flavor will not be affected and they will become clear again at room temperature.Q: Please tell me if there is any difference between saffron and Mexican saffron.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin | October 7, 2006
King Arthur 100% Organic White Whole Wheat Flour What it is --A finely textured white whole-wheat flour What we like about it --Now available in organic form, this whole-wheat flour has a finer texture than most, and its pale color means it won't change the color of your baked goods. We substituted it for all-purpose flour in our favorite muffins and loved the way it performed; the muffins rose high and browned nicely. What it costs --$2.50 for 2 pounds; $4.75 for 5 pounds Where to buy --Available at some grocery and specialty stores, and at bakerscatalogue.
FEATURES
By Kathy Manweiler and Kathy Manweiler,McClatchy-Tribune | June 30, 2007
With the Fourth of July around the corner, this recipe can put your taste buds in a festive mood without sending your healthy eating habits up in smoke. My Red, White and Blue Coffeecake is based on a dish in Richard Simmons' Farewell to Fat cookbook. His version was already pretty virtuous, but I made some alterations that kicked the nutrition up a notch. I started by using white whole wheat flour in place of half of the all-purpose flour. Compared to all-purpose flour, a cup of white whole wheat flour comes with an extra 11 grams of fiber, which helps you feel full longer.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | July 10, 1991
A big thank you to Regina M. Stein of Baltimore who wrote us with a cake flour substitution. A couple of weeks ago we ran a recipe calling for cake flour. We pointed out that cake flour, sold in the baking goods aisle at the supermarket, is not the same thing as all-purpose flour. We also noted that all-purpose flour can't be substituted for cake flour.Regina says all-purpose flour can be substituted using this simple formula. For each cup of cake flour called for, use instead one cup, sifted all-purpose flour minus two tablespoons.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | December 26, 2007
There's a lot of hoity-toity food around these days, and we like a lot of it. On the other hand, there is much to be said for voluntary simplicity. Consider the good, old-fashioned Yankee pot roast. Here it is, a meal (almost) in a pot. The pot roast includes a little cider vinegar to tenderize the beef and add a teensy tang. Robin Mather Jenkins writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Old-Fashioned Pot Roast Makes 8 servings -- Total time: 8 hours and 15 minutes 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt freshly ground pepper 1 beef chuck roast, 2 1/2 to 3 pounds, trimmed 3 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 cup beef or chicken broth 2 tablespoons quick-mixing flour, such as Wondra 8 red potatoes, halved 8 small carrots 2 yellow onions, quartered 1/3 cup apple-cider vinegar Combine the all-purpose flour, salt and pepper to taste in a large resealable plastic bag. Add the meat; seal.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | December 19, 2007
Thelma Maisenholder of Fallston was looking for a recipe for a Louisiana Ring Cake like the one her mother used to buy many years ago from Rice's Bakery in Baltimore. Irene Gozdziewski of Baltimore, 84, sent in a copy of the recipe that she clipped some time ago from the newspaper. She, too, remembers buying the cake from the Rice's deliveryman in the '40s and '50s. This is a classic, Southern-style ring cake. It is easy to make and is very moist and delicious with nice hints of orange and almond.
FEATURES
By Kathy Manweiler and Kathy Manweiler,McClatchy-Tribune | June 30, 2007
With the Fourth of July around the corner, this recipe can put your taste buds in a festive mood without sending your healthy eating habits up in smoke. My Red, White and Blue Coffeecake is based on a dish in Richard Simmons' Farewell to Fat cookbook. His version was already pretty virtuous, but I made some alterations that kicked the nutrition up a notch. I started by using white whole wheat flour in place of half of the all-purpose flour. Compared to all-purpose flour, a cup of white whole wheat flour comes with an extra 11 grams of fiber, which helps you feel full longer.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin | October 7, 2006
King Arthur 100% Organic White Whole Wheat Flour What it is --A finely textured white whole-wheat flour What we like about it --Now available in organic form, this whole-wheat flour has a finer texture than most, and its pale color means it won't change the color of your baked goods. We substituted it for all-purpose flour in our favorite muffins and loved the way it performed; the muffins rose high and browned nicely. What it costs --$2.50 for 2 pounds; $4.75 for 5 pounds Where to buy --Available at some grocery and specialty stores, and at bakerscatalogue.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1998
How about a Swiss-steak dinner followed by a dessert of banana-pineapple cake?Swiss steak cooked on top of the stove was the request of Blanche Moan of Crystal Lake, Ill. She wanted to duplicate a dish made by her sisters, who are now deceased. "All I can remember is that it was delicious," she said.Food tester Laura Reiley chose a recipe from Boots Reichart of Glen Arm to fulfill Moan's wish.A banana-pineapple cake similar to one made by Herman's Bakery several years ago was the request of George M. Walter of Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1996
Just roll this thought around in your head and you'll taste it. A macadamia nut caramelized tart. Bet you want to try one.Wilma Edwards of Lumberton, N.C., wrote that she had "turned on a TV station and heard the name but didn't get the ingredients. Can you help me?"Her answer came from Darlene Townsend of Baltimore, who says her recipe was "adapted from one which originated at Chez Panisse as published in Compliments of the Chef, 1985. I made this dessert for an 'island party' a few years ago and it disappeared almost as soon as it was set on the table."
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | March 8, 1995
Q: I made a gelatin salad using fresh pineapple and it didn't set. What happened?A: Pineapple contains an enzyme that prevents gelatin from setting. It can also turn many proteins mushy, such as chicken that's mixed in a salad with fresh pineapple. Canned pineapple is a good substitute because the enzyme is destroyed in the canning process.Q: What is a pot-au-feu?A: This is a French term for a dish which usually consists of a beef broth, boiled meat (typically beef) and vegetables, almost a meal in itself.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | January 11, 1995
Q: I see so many new nonstick pots and pans on the market but I hesitate to buy any because I had so many in the past that didn't last more than a couple months. The coating always scratched and then everything would stick. Is there anything that really will last?A: I think most of us have had frustrating experiences with nonstick pans losing their coating.The new ones on the market, however, are greatly improved and, for the most part, last much longer than those available a decade ago.Nonstick pans are in particular demand in these health-conscious times because of their ability to cook foods without sticking while using little or no fat. That's led to a lot of competition to develop the longest-lasting surface.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | March 8, 1995
Q: I made a gelatin salad using fresh pineapple and it didn't set. What happened?A: Pineapple contains an enzyme that prevents gelatin from setting. It can also turn many proteins mushy, such as chicken that's mixed in a salad with fresh pineapple. Canned pineapple is a good substitute because the enzyme is destroyed in the canning process.Q: What is a pot-au-feu?A: This is a French term for a dish which usually consists of a beef broth, boiled meat (typically beef) and vegetables, almost a meal in itself.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens | March 1, 1995
For a warm-from-the-oven brunch or breakfast bread, bake this handy, heart-healthy coffeecake. You probably have most of the ingredients on your shelves already. Applesauce takes over the role of cooking oil, making the cinnamony bread moist and tender.And, to lower the cholesterol, you use egg substitute in place of the eggs.Spiced Apple CoffeecakeServes 10Nonstick spray coating2/3 cup all-purpose flour1/2 cup whole-wheat flour1 teaspoon baking soda1 teaspoon ground cinnamon1/4 teaspoon salt1 1/2 cups peeled, cored and finely chopped apple (2 large)
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | January 11, 1995
Q: I see so many new nonstick pots and pans on the market but I hesitate to buy any because I had so many in the past that didn't last more than a couple months. The coating always scratched and then everything would stick. Is there anything that really will last?A: I think most of us have had frustrating experiences with nonstick pans losing their coating.The new ones on the market, however, are greatly improved and, for the most part, last much longer than those available a decade ago.Nonstick pans are in particular demand in these health-conscious times because of their ability to cook foods without sticking while using little or no fat. That's led to a lot of competition to develop the longest-lasting surface.
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