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NEWS
April 5, 2005
AN UNHAPPY indicator of Baltimore's struggle to tame one of the most serious heroin addiction problems of any major city has been a staggering number of overdose deaths. From 2000 to 2003, the number of fatal drug overdoses ranged from 297 to 336, outpacing the number of homicides each year. But the city's Health Department announced last week that in 2004, the number of fatal overdoses was 261, less than the homicide total of 278, and a five-year low. What happened? Among other reasons, Health Commissioner Peter L. Beilenson and other experts attribute the dramatic drop to increased availability of drug treatment and a year-old experimental program that trains addicts to recognize an overdose and intervene to stop it. The Staying Alive program, which is funded by a two-year grant from the Open Society Institute, has trained about 560 heroin addicts to use mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and to inject Narcan (known generically as naxolone)
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SPORTS
By Bob Hough and Baltimore Sun Media Group | September 24, 2014
Archbishop Spalding girls soccer coach Ashly Kennedy was not immediately certain who scored the go-ahead goal against Severn on Wednesday. By the time Sarah Ensor was identified as the goal's author, the No. 8 Cavaliers had won their 15th straight regular season game in the Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland A Conference against teams other than McDonogh. Spalding fought back from a late deficit and scored two goals in the final 13 minutes to knock off the No. 3 Admirals, 2-1. "The energy was the game-changer in today's game," Spalding coach Ashly Kennedy said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dorothea Straus and By Dorothea Straus,Special to the Sun | December 16, 2001
Still Alive: A Holocaust Girlhood, by Ruth Kluger. The Feminist Press of the City of New York. 213 pages. $24.95. This Holocaust memoir is a latecomer to the United States, despite its renown abroad and the prestige of international prizes. Countless other such memoirs, museum exhibitions, ceremonies, and films have preceded its arrival here, yet Still Alive is able to make Hitler's death camps present, as a new and shocking event. The passage of time has paled the atrocities and the young remain in semi-ignorance.
NEWS
July 9, 2014
The flood of unaccompanied minors from Central America across the United States' southern border in recent months has raised a knotty problem for Congress and President Barack Obama: What do you call thousands of children illegally entering the country without their parents - a failure to enforce U.S. immigration laws, or a humanitarian crisis in the making? Not surprisingly, House Republicans prefer calling it the former, then claiming Democrats and the Obama administration can't be trusted to secure the country's borders.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 19, 1993
How do you get audiences into theaters to see a movie abou cannibalism? A movie -- based on a true-life event -- that had already been the stuff of a schlocky production (1976's "Survive!") about a Uruguayan rugby team whose plane crashes in the Andes and whose survivors endured subzero temperatures, blizzards, avalanches and the frozen meat of their dead teammates for 10 weeks on a barren mountainside?If you are director Frank Marshall and Disney's Touchstone Pictures, you sell the movie very carefully.
NEWS
January 5, 1993
Gov. William Donald Schaefer should see to it that the Butta commission on efficiency in government stays in business after it turns in its final report later this month. Much work remains to be done to implement the group's money-saving recommendations. At this stage, a renewed commitment from the governor iscrucial.So far, the blue-ribbon gubernatorial panel headed by retired C&P Telephone CEO J. Henry Butta has delivered two reports, containing suggestions that could save $120 million a year.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | January 3, 1991
The original comedy and songs of local performer, Paul Skotarski, will be presented in his first one-man show, "Yams Alive!," at 9 p.m. Jan. 11 at the BAUhouse, 1713 N. Charles St.A character actor of high caliber, Skotarski, 27, describes his brand of absurdist comedy as "strictly for laughs, the belly laugh," although at times he does make a social or political statement.The actor-writer says his work is more European than mainstream American humor. "A combination of Monty Python and Samuel Beckett.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | August 18, 2006
Six of 75 cats discovered in a Columbia townhouse remained alive yesterday after police responded to complaints of a "foul odor" coming from the home late last week, said Pfc. Jennifer Reidy, a spokeswoman for Howard County authorities. When animal control officers arrived at the house in the 7300 block of Swan Point Way, 17 cats were dead and 58 were taken to a local veterinarian, who determined that 50 of them were so ill that they needed to be euthanized. Two more died Sunday night.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 29, 1994
Jeffrey L. Dahmer is dead, but the legal battle over his estate is still alive.Several families of Mr. Dahmer's victims sued him and were awarded millions of dollars, and ever since have been trying to gain control of the contents of his Milwaukee apartment, where he killed most of his victims.The families want to auction off some 312 items, including a 55-gallon vat he used to decompose the bodies; the refrigerator where he stored hearts; a saw, a hammer and his toothbrush.Tom Jacobson, the lawyer for the families, said the auction could bring more than $100,000.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2003
AS IT HAS been for two weeks, the most intriguing question to come out of this nasty little war with Iraq is: Where's Saddam Hussein? Is he alive? Is that really him in those grainy images from Iraqi TV that show a puffy Hussein meeting with his military commanders and his two nutty sons? And if so, when was that footage shot? Or is Hussein pushing up daisies somewhere in Baghdad, blown into early martyrdom by U.S. cruise missiles on the first night of the war? Now comes a terrorism expert who says, basically: What difference does it make?
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
A multi-agency, multi-day search for a Potomac River kayaker was called off on Sunday after it was determined he had simply ditched his kayak and gone home — "oblivious" to the fact that authorities became alarmed after finding his kayak floating upside down. The Montgomery County Police Department first requested the public's help on Friday in identifying the owner of the abandoned kayak, which was near the Anglers Inn boat ramp south of Great Falls. Earlier in the day, witnesses at the Great Falls observation deck had reported seeing a man in the kayak, and told police that it had "appeared that he may have needed assistance.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. - Johns Hopkins' 14-8 victory over eighth-seeded Virginia in an NCAA tournament first-round game on Sunday at Klockner Stadium propelled the team to its 13th quarterfinal since the field was expanded to four rounds for the 2003 campaign. It was especially meaningful for many Blue Jays players who had suffered the indignity of being part of a 2013 squad that contributed to the program missing out on the NCAA postseason for the first time since 1971. “Last year not getting in, it was tough to sit at home with all of these games going on and knowing that we weren't playing,” junior attackman Wells Stanwick said.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Following a 55-minute rain delay that they probably shouldn't have had to endure Saturday night, the Orioles had new life against the Houston Astros. Closer Tommy Hunter had just blown a one-run lead in the top of the ninth inning before a downpour descended on Camden Yards. But when the clouds moved out, the Orioles rallied with two outs in the ninth to force the game into extra innings. Down to their last out, the Orioles loaded the bases before pinch hitter Delmon Young beat out a bouncer to shortstop to drive in the tying run. One inning later, catcher Steve Clevenger (Mount St. Joseph)
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
On Sunday morning, as Christians in the region and around the world take part in the Easter traditions they enjoy, an observer might be tempted to ask: How do the ways they celebrate the holiday reflect its meaning? Children pet bunnies and gobble jelly beans. Wal-Mart sells more than 500 types of Easter confection, including unicorn- and space alien-themed baskets. Just a few of them allude to Christianity. How does eating a package of Peeps recall the man Christians believe redeemed the world by rising from the dead nearly 2,000 years ago?
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 23, 2014
And what shall we say now that the monster has died? His estranged sons Mark and Nate told the world just a few days ago that their 84-year old father, Fred Phelps, was in the care of a hospice and "on the edge of death. " Thursday morning, he went over the edge. The senior Phelps, of course, was the founder of Westboro Baptist "Church" in Topeka, Kan. He was the "God hates" guy. As in "God Hates China" (its divorce rates are too high), "God Hates Islam" (for being a false religion)
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | March 21, 2014
Maryland wrestler Jimmy Sheptock moved on to the quarterfinal round with two wins on the opening day of the NCAA wrestling championships at the Chesapeake Energy Arena on Thursday. Five Terps started the day and four will continue on to today's action. Christian Boley and Shyheim Brown rebounded from first-round losses with wins in their wrestlebacks while Spencer Myers won in the opening round and dropped his second match. Sheptock, the top seed at 184 pounds, began his day against unseeded Ben Stroh of Wyoming and used a takedown and 2-point near fall in the third period to seal a 10-3 decision victory.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker | September 2, 1994
FREDERICK -- Eric Chavez's bases-loaded single with two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning gave the Frederick Keys a 4-3 victory over the Durham Bulls last night and kept them alive in the Single-A Carolina League playoff race.Frederick's final series this weekend is against first-place Wilmington, which won the first half. The Keys must sweep the Blue Rocks to reach postseason play.Chavez, the Keys third baseman, drove in all of his team's runs, hitting his 23rd home run with two aboard in the first to stake starter Jim Walker to a 3-0 lead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 15, 1993
Would you? Really, would you? No, not thinking about it now, sitting at the breakfast table or on the bus. No, of course not, you wouldn't, you couldn't. It's beyond you. But imagine: You've spent three weeks on a mountaintop. Rescue is out of the quWould you? Really, would you? No, not thinking about it now, sitting at the breakfast table or on the bus. No, of course not, you wouldn't, you couldn't. It's beyond you. But imagine: You've spent three weeks on a mountaintop. Rescue is out of the question.
NEWS
By Pat Farmer | March 19, 2014
One evening my sister, Mary, called me, all excited about a news item she saw on ABC's World News with Diane Sawyer. Mary said that it was both sad and beautiful at the same time. The episode, in Sawyer's "America Strong" segment, was titled, "iPods Awaken Memories through Music For Those with Alzheimer's," reported by Byron Pitts. Mary and I have often discussed dementia and Alzheimer's and how it has affected people we know. I had to see this news episode so, later I watched the segment online at abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2014/03/05/ipods-awaken-memories-through-music-for-those-with-alzheimers/.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 24, 2014
"Discrimination," he said, "is horrible. It's hurtful. It has no place in civilized society... " You would think that statement, delivered recently in the Kansas legislature, a noble sentiment no right-thinking person could argue with. But we are gathered here today to argue with it. Because it turns out that when Republican legislator Charles Macheers said "discrimination," he didn't mean, well ... discrimination. Mr. Macheers sponsored a bill -- passed overwhelmingly by the Kansas House, but killed last week by the Senate in an attack of common sense -- that sought to exempt any business or government employee from providing "any services, accommodations, advantages, facilities, goods or privileges" related to any "marriage, domestic partnership, civil union or similar arrangement" if doing so would conflict with the employee's" sincerely held religious beliefs.
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