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By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
If you thought there are few surprises left, here's one: In Maryland, you don't need to be divorced to be forced to pay alimony. So says Maryland's second-highest court. And just in case you're ready to accuse these judges of being activists bent on rewriting the law, history and common sense, the unanimous decision handed down late last month is steeped in historical precedent. Steeped in so much precedent, in fact, that the judges had to go back three centuries to references in English common law. Turns out that in 1777, when the Free State first started hearing cases involving alimony - or, as the current court put it, "simply a fancy name for separate maintenance" - this state's judges did not copy the ecclesiastical courts of England as closely as perhaps they should have.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann , peter.hermann@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
If you thought there are few surprises left, here's one: In Maryland, you don't need to be divorced to be forced to pay alimony. So says Maryland's second-highest court. And just in case you're ready to accuse these judges of being activists bent on rewriting the law, history and common sense, the unanimous decision handed down late last month is steeped in historical precedent. Steeped in so much precedent, in fact, that the judges had to go back three centuries to references in English common law. Turns out that in 1777, when the Free State first started hearing cases involving alimony - or, as the current court put it, "simply a fancy name for separate maintenance" - this state's judges did not copy the ecclesiastical courts of England as closely as perhaps they should have.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann , peter.hermann@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
If you thought there are few surprises left, here's one: In Maryland, you don't need to be divorced to be forced to pay alimony. So says Maryland's second-highest court. And just in case you're ready to accuse these judges of being activists bent on rewriting the law, history and common sense, the unanimous decision handed down late last month is steeped in historical precedent. Steeped in so much precedent, in fact, that the judges had to go back three centuries to references in English common law. Turns out that in 1777, when the Free State first started hearing cases involving alimony - or, as the current court put it, "simply a fancy name for separate maintenance" - this state's judges did not copy the ecclesiastical courts of England as closely as perhaps they should have.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
If you thought there are few surprises left, here's one: In Maryland, you don't need to be divorced to be forced to pay alimony. So says Maryland's second-highest court. And just in case you're ready to accuse these judges of being activists bent on rewriting the law, history and common sense, the unanimous decision handed down late last month is steeped in historical precedent. Steeped in so much precedent, in fact, that the judges had to go back three centuries to references in English common law. Turns out that in 1777, when the Free State first started hearing cases involving alimony - or, as the current court put it, "simply a fancy name for separate maintenance" - this state's judges did not copy the ecclesiastical courts of England as closely as perhaps they should have.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | June 28, 1992
Linda Gebhart was at wit's end after spending six years trying unsuccessfully to collect the more than $60,000 she contends her ex-husband owed in unpaid alimony payments.Her experience inspired the Bel Air resident to form a group she dubbed WIT'S END -- an acronym for We Intend to Stop Enduring Deadbeats.The newly formed group plans to lobby for legal changes that would make it easier for women to collect unpaid spouse and child-support payments."I've been told I'm irrational, crazy, too angry, but I started out polite and it didn't work, so now our group is going to state delegates, senators and congresswomen to get these laws changed," said Gebhart.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2002
A state court ordered yesterday that Edwin F. Hale Sr., chairman and chief executive officer of First Mariner Bancorp., pay his ex-wife $1.3 million as a penalty for failing to make alimony payments on time after their divorce in 1988. The Court of Special Appeals decision reversed a Baltimore County Circuit Court ruling last year that had barred Sheila F. Thacker from collecting the sum. Hale said he will appeal yesterday's ruling to the Court of Appeals, the state's highest court. "I'm definitely going to appeal," he said.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2000
Members of the Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants are answering readers' tax questions in advance of the April 17 filing deadline. I am legally separated from my wife, and in our agreement I promised to give her one-half of my police pension, which I'm presently receiving and paying taxes on. Can I claim this as alimony or how would I claim it? In this agreement we agreed to pay our own taxes. Only if the payments are made under a post-1984 divorce or written separation agreement can they be deducted as alimony.
NEWS
By Charles Shafer | August 30, 2000
ARE THOSE bankers I see hiding behind the women's skirts? The consumer finance industry is conducting an expensive publicity campaign to promote bankruptcy law changes. It's no surprise to see them exaggerate the amount of money lost to dishonest consumers abusing the system. And it's not surprising that they would try to mislead us about the consequences of rules they champion. But it is particularly galling when the promoters of this legislation pretend it will help unfortunate women who are owed alimony and child support by deadbeat dads.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1999
A Columbia man pleaded guilty yesterday in federal court to conspiring to skim money from seven HUD-subsidized low-income apartment complexes that he once managed.The guilty plea of Monte D. Greenbaum, 49, who managed the properties as head of Catonsville-based Maryland Property Associates Inc., came 2 1/2 weeks after prosecutors charged him with skimming $840,000 between 1993 and 1998 from the accounts of 1,700 units he managed in Baltimore, Baltimore County, Cumberland and Hagerstown.U.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 23, 1993
About half of all U.S. marriages will end in divorce, statistics show.Still, many people are misinformed about the financial consequences of a breakup. Here are some common myths, compiled by the Institute of Certified Financial Planners in Denver.* Everything is divided 50/50: The standard in most states is "equitable distrubution." What that means varies from state to state and from judge to judge. The division of assets can be tied to the length of the marriage, income, age, education, earning capacity, etc.* All assets are equal, dollar for dollar: When taxes, commissions and invertment gains are factored in, all assets are not equal.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | March 23, 2008
Splitting from a spouse? It may be painful, but don't forget the long-term view. Getting your retirement nest egg through a divorce takes more time, patience and short-term cash than many people can muster during such a traumatic period. Often, this leaves them vulnerable to problems down the road, said financial planners who cater to divorcing couples. And when the split happens near retirement, it can be particularly painful. "A lot of people [at or near retirement] just stay in unhappy marriages because the economics are more than they can contemplate.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2006
Throughout tax season, Baltimoresun.com is publishing a weekly question-and-answer column with Jim Wilhelm, Stuart Rudo and Greg Horning from the Hunt Valley accounting firm SC&H Group on common questions that may come up as you prepare your returns. Here is an edited transcript of this week's column: My mother has medical expenses that total over $25,000 for this year. Most of this is for what we pay people to come in and help her with basic needs such as bed, bath, feeding, etc. We pay people out of our pocket and do not withhold any taxes.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2002
A state court ordered yesterday that Edwin F. Hale Sr., chairman and chief executive officer of First Mariner Bancorp., pay his ex-wife $1.3 million as a penalty for failing to make alimony payments on time after their divorce in 1988. The Court of Special Appeals decision reversed a Baltimore County Circuit Court ruling last year that had barred Sheila F. Thacker from collecting the sum. Hale said he will appeal yesterday's ruling to the Court of Appeals, the state's highest court. "I'm definitely going to appeal," he said.
NEWS
By Charles Shafer | August 30, 2000
ARE THOSE bankers I see hiding behind the women's skirts? The consumer finance industry is conducting an expensive publicity campaign to promote bankruptcy law changes. It's no surprise to see them exaggerate the amount of money lost to dishonest consumers abusing the system. And it's not surprising that they would try to mislead us about the consequences of rules they champion. But it is particularly galling when the promoters of this legislation pretend it will help unfortunate women who are owed alimony and child support by deadbeat dads.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2000
Members of the Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants are answering readers' tax questions in advance of the April 17 filing deadline. I am legally separated from my wife, and in our agreement I promised to give her one-half of my police pension, which I'm presently receiving and paying taxes on. Can I claim this as alimony or how would I claim it? In this agreement we agreed to pay our own taxes. Only if the payments are made under a post-1984 divorce or written separation agreement can they be deducted as alimony.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1999
A Columbia man pleaded guilty yesterday in federal court to conspiring to skim money from seven HUD-subsidized low-income apartment complexes that he once managed.The guilty plea of Monte D. Greenbaum, 49, who managed the properties as head of Catonsville-based Maryland Property Associates Inc., came 2 1/2 weeks after prosecutors charged him with skimming $840,000 between 1993 and 1998 from the accounts of 1,700 units he managed in Baltimore, Baltimore County, Cumberland and Hagerstown.U.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2006
Throughout tax season, Baltimoresun.com is publishing a weekly question-and-answer column with Jim Wilhelm, Stuart Rudo and Greg Horning from the Hunt Valley accounting firm SC&H Group on common questions that may come up as you prepare your returns. Here is an edited transcript of this week's column: My mother has medical expenses that total over $25,000 for this year. Most of this is for what we pay people to come in and help her with basic needs such as bed, bath, feeding, etc. We pay people out of our pocket and do not withhold any taxes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 14, 1998
WASHINGTON -- With the number of personal bankruptcies soaring, the House Judiciary Committee considered a controversial bill yesterday promoted by the banking and credit card industries to make it more difficult for people to declare themselves legally broke.By defeating several changes proposed by Democrats, the Republicans in control of the committee signaled that they would pass the bill, probably today.The Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to consider a somewhat less strict version as early as today, and both houses could vote next week.
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