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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1997
Yesterday's Howard Stern Look-Alike-Contest at Camden Yards begged a few questions:Who wants to look like Howard Stern anyway?Is this Louis XIV-retro look something women find appealing?Do men aspire to his Sun King ... uhhhh ... intriguing looks?To what lengths would a man go to look like this?And, for that matter, when a man wants to look like the world's most overexposed shock jock, does he don a leather jacket and shades -- or mascara and spike heels? Stern did, after all, top 1995's "Worst Dressed Women" list after numerous appearances in drag.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 10, 2014
When you think about it, name recognition in business and politics is really a double-edged sword. If the name is golden, or even brass-plated, it can open doors and take you places. But a widely recognized name can also cause people to question you harder - or in a different way - than they might a newcomer. They might even hold your name against you. Take Jon Cardin in the campaign for Maryland attorney general. With Maryland's primary election just two weeks from now, he's enjoying a fat lead in the latest Baltimore Sun poll over his Democratic primary opponents, Brian Frosh and Aisha Braveboy.
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FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | February 21, 2006
"We designed the characters five years before we got the actors. So it just weirdly happened that they looked alike." Tim Burton on the casting of the voices in the Oscar-nomi nated The Corpse Bride.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
For more than a century, the family behind Trinacria Foods has been a reliable source for great Italian food products. The family's flagship location - a shop and deli on North Paca Street - is the kind of spot that inspires loyalty, even love. Between the gigantic sandwiches, the sweet Italian treats and the unbelievably low-priced bottles of wine, there's a lot to like. The family's new Mount Vernon outpost, Trinacria Cafe, opened earlier this year to an enthusiastic reception.
FEATURES
October 7, 1990
You don't need an architecturally designed one-of-a-kind floor plan to reflect your personal style. Look-alike floor plans only look alike until they've been dressed in the best reflection of your own taste and personality. These two identical floor plans in four different apartments were photographed from exactly the same angle at the same time of day to illustrate how furnishings make a difference not only in the style of a home, but even in its mood.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 13, 2000
The one presidential person up there was Jim Lehrer. They sound alike. One guy says, Dont mess with Texas. The other, . . .Taxes. Q. What is two plus two times two minus two divided by two? A. Fuzzy math. At long last. The Nobel Prizes are for consumer products and market research. Quick, get a housing commissioner while some housing still stands.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | January 11, 1998
IS THAT A "live" check sitting in your mailbox, missing only your signature to turn it into instant $5,000 to $10,000 cash? Or is it a look-alike check with a much bigger payout number -- from $30,000 up -- that's not a check at all, but instead a come-on for a high interest-rate loan secured by your home?If you've been confused recently by one or more such "checks" peeking through the cellophane windows of envelopes that resemble those used by federal agencies, join the crowd. "Live" checks and look-alike dummy checks are two of the fastest-growing techniques for marketing debt to homeowners, and they're upsetting not only consumers, but some members of Congress as well.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | July 4, 1999
IF YOU OWN a home, you've probably received at least a couple of official-looking "checks" in the mail, made out to you personally for anywhere from $15,000 to $75,000.Often the checks resemble the one that arrived at the home of Arlington, Va., homeowners in May: It was for $41,750 and carried a prominent Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. logo reading, "Each depositor insured to $100,000." It also featured a 10-digit "Reservation Number" and the boldface words "Voucher Certificate."The check, of course, was a fake -- a "look-alike" in the lingo of direct-mail marketing.
FEATURES
By Aaron Epstein and Aaron Epstein,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Entertainer Bette Midler summoned her lawyers after an advertising agency hired a sound-alike singer to evoke yuppie memories by imitating Ms. Midler's "Do You Want to Dance?" for a Mercury Sable commercial.Singer Tom Waits heard an imitator of his gravelly voice sing the praises of SalsaRio Doritos and became increasingly incensed by what he called "this corn chip sermon."One-role personality Vanna White sued the creators of an ad that put a blond robot in a TV game show.Ms.
NEWS
April 10, 2001
FROM JURIES who acquit cop killers to businessmen who lie in wait for burglars -- to those who applaud these actions -- Baltimore-area citizens have shown an unhealthy willingness recently to take the law into their own hands. That response to crime strikes some as reasonable, overdue and totally justifiable. And, of course, the impulse to deputize oneself has a storied history in this country. But long ago, a strong consensus held that other means of protection would be needed to avoid collapsing into a pit of unrestrained violence.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 7, 2014
President Obama was doing his favorite thing this week: talking to crowds of adoring young people who already agree with him while acting like he persuaded them about something. They also seemed to give Obama the impression that he's a really funny guy. On Wednesday, he told a crowd of 1,400 at the University of Michigan that he visited a local deli, Zingerman's. He proceeded to tell a long story about ordering the small Reuben sandwich, which he said was "killer. " That description got a good laugh.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 24, 2014
Former Democratic National Chairman Robert S. Strauss, who passed away Wednesday at a robustly lived 95, was a happy political warrior whose talent and energies took him far afield from his chosen playground, even to Moscow where he served as the first American ambassador after the collapse of the Soviet Union. He was a rare combination of straight-talker and schmoozer who endeared himself to friend and foe alike, to the point that when he left Russia in 1993, he was given a huge vodka-flowing reception at the Russian Embassy in Washington.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
Shykill Brewer was arrested on a misdemeanor gun charge days before Christmas. He should have been able to post bail in plenty of time to celebrate with his infant son and the rest of his family, but instead spent six weeks in jail. Under court rules, defendants should have a chance to post bail or ask a judge for release within 24 hours, or as soon as courts are open. It took 43 days for Brewer. A judge finally set his bail at $100,000, and Brewer's family soon secured his release.
NEWS
By Benn Ray, benn@atomicbooks.com | January 15, 2014
As far as years go, 2014 has come barreling out of the gate, with a whole host of happenings already lined up in Hampden. Gallery 788, 3602 Hickory Ave., presents Learning By Heart, an exhibit and performance for children 4-12 with no formal training, on Jan. 19, from 4-8 p.m. It's sort of like the kiddie equivalent of outsider art. Kids can show their art work, sing, dance, recite, act or tell jokes. All performances must be non-violent and family-friendly. For more information, call 202-210-8361.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 19, 2013
Maybe everyone is misreading America's views on foreign policy? Among Republicans, there's a big argument between the so-called isolationist wing of the party and the ostensibly interventionist wing. On the left, there's a similar debate (though liberals are never described as isolationists no matter how isolationist they might be). Among Democrats, the dividing lines are murkier if for no other reason than the Democratic Party takes its lead from President Barack Obama, and his own views are murky, to put it charitably.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 9, 2013
The young Barack Obama's early enthusiasm for anti-war progressivism is well chronicled in his autobiography. Friendships with the likes of anti-war activists/bombers Bill Ayers and wife Bernardine Dohrn, poet Frank Marshall Davis, and the notorious Rev. Jeremiah Wright, and brief stints as a public interest lawyer, law professor, and community activist deepened his appreciation for leftist thought - and action. Indeed, the young senator from Illinois rode intense criticism of Bush-era foreign policy adventures and domestic surveillance practices all the way to the White House.
NEWS
September 15, 1993
For Jews, the New Year's celebration that is about to commence marks the beginning of an innately inward-looking, contemplative set of holidays. The celebratory Rosh Hashana and atoning Yom Kippur are commemorations that require Jews to take stock of who they are, of how they can improve, of things for which they should be thankful.It can be a time of emotion even for the great share of American Jews who hardly mark their religion and heritage the rest of the year and certainly not to the same extent as their immigrant ancestors only a few generations ago.Ironically, these holidays rife with personal introspection have also coincided with some major events involving Israel and world Jewry over the past generation.
NEWS
September 3, 1992
Remember the unremorseful insolence of John Thanos as h received his second and third death sentences in June -- this time for the murder of two Middle River teen-agers? If those lives meant nothing to Thanos, people familiar with his story have suggested that he probably considers his own life worthless as well. Year after year, his hard-drinking, abusive father drilled in the lesson that Thanos wasn't worthy of respect or self-esteem.This is not to excuse criminals for savage acts, but rather to point out the price society sometimes pays for child abuse.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | January 8, 2013
As Washington politicians search for budget solutions, imagine if there were a magical revenue source that operated not unlike a national consumption tax that many conservatives prefer and would mitigate global warming to please liberals, all while helping repair America's infrastructure and strengthening our national security, to the delight of almost everyone. Actually, such a tax already exists: It's called the federal gasoline tax, and it's been stuck at 18.4 cents per gallon for two decades.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
As it brightens the Bowie Playhouse stage, 2nd Star's energetic production of "Oklahoma!" proves that as it nears age 70, this first Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein collaboration has lost little luster. At its 1943 opening, "Oklahoma!" was the first Broadway show to integrate songs into the narrative, changing the musical form forever. In 2nd Star's production, a cast of 37 and a crew of at least 25 deliver this American classic with gusto. Bowie Playhouse boasts an orchestra pit (a rarity in area theaters)
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