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By Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
I apologize in advance for my fascination with the "wide-nine" alignment that the Philadelphia Eagles will often use on defense Sunday, but if you are as curious about it as I am, then you probably won't mind me expounding on it a little further on the blog. And if you're not as curious, maybe this stat will pique your interest: The Eagles were first in the NFL with 50 sacks in 2011, and they did it by rushing just four players 82 percent of the time, according to the fine folks at Football Outsiders.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Mars will appear at its biggest and brightest in the night sky this week as it aligns with the Earth and sun on Tuesday. The red planet reaches what is known as opposition Tuesday, when it and the sun are on directly opposite sides of the Earth. That occurs once about every 26 months, according to NASA. "Earth makes two trips around the sun in about the same amount of time that Mars takes to make one trip," according to NASA . "So sometimes the two planets are on opposite sides of the sun, very far apart, and other times, Earth catches up with its neighbor and passes relatively close to it. " This month, Earth and Mars are meanwhile at their closest for nearly 6 and a half years, appearing bigger and brighter than it has since December 2007, according to EarthSky.org.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,Sun Staff Writer | September 15, 1995
Baltimore County volleyball coaches may have to do some extra homework in this first year of divisional alignments based on strength."We can't take anyone for granted," said Perry Hall coach Pam Wilt. "We don't know much about some of the teams in the league. They've had to play Catonsville and Loch Raven, but they could have been overshadowed by them and still be decent."Last year, Wilt's Gators won the county's Class 3A-4A division and fell to Class 1A-2A winner Loch Raven in the county title game.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
Maryland schools will be scrambling to make $100 million in technological and other upgrades to give new state tests aligned with the Common Core standards next year, according to a report to the legislature by the Maryland State Department of Education. Some local school systems would need to shut down some of the normal uses of the computers, including sending email, to give the online standardized tests, the report said. Some districts reported that they need to buy thousands of new computers for the tests, which are required by the spring of 2015; others said they had nowhere to put the computers that they need to buy. Lawmakers briefed Wednesday said the magnitude of the hurdles that school districts face — and the price tags — are concerning.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson ((TCSO: Staff Writer | June 29, 1993
State Highway Administration officials last night gave Howard County Council members a glowing presentation on the benefits of a new alignment for Route 100 that would take it through southern Ellicott City and asked for a recommendation from the council by the end of next month.But SHA Administrator Hal Kassoff told council members that while such action would "strengthen" the process, they have no obligation to express a preference for a particular route.Councilman C. Vernon Gray, a Democrat who represents the two communities that have favored routes on different sides of the federally protected Deep Run stream, questioned the value of the council's involvement.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | July 23, 1993
Grudgingly but nearly unanimously, Howard County elected officials supported last night a Route 100 alignment designed by a day care provider whose property was threatened by the planned six-lane highway.Faced with a choice preferred by federal regulators -- who would not permit an alignment local elected officials chose in 1987 -- or one that the state's chief planner said might delay the highway another two years, all but two officials chose the former."It makes the best of a very bad situation that the county has gotten into through lack of foresight and very bad planning," said Del. John S. Morgan.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | July 22, 1993
History will repeat itself tonight in the Howard County Council auditorium.At 6:30 p.m., county elected officials will meet to try to agree on where to build state Route 100 through southern Ellicott City, an exercise identical to the one in which they participated in May 1987.Then, local officials chose a route along the Deep Run stream east of Route 104, ostensibly to avoid the existing homes of Hunt Country Estates and the yet-to-be-built condominiums of the Village of Montgomery Run.What they didn't avoid was Deep Run and its wetlands, something federal regulators have have since insisted must be done.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | October 31, 2011
After a dreadful first half against the Arizona Cardinals, the Ravens needed an accelerant on offense. In addition to the play of wide receiver Anquan Boldin and running back Ray Rice, the unit got a sizable pick-me-up from tight ends Ed Dickson and Dennis Pitta. “Diesel” is the Ravens' two tight-end set. From that alignment, Dickson and Pitta provide additional pass protection or run blocking, or they can run seam routes and flares to give quarterback Joe Flacco more options.
NEWS
May 27, 1998
BRINGING LIGHT rail into Glen Burnie should enhance the community. Yet neither of the two alignments being considered to extend the line that now runs from Hunt Valley in Baltimore County to Baltimore-Washington International Airport would accomplish this goal. Before the process continues, state Mass Transit Administration officials should re-examine an option they rejected earlier.The MTA is weighing the circuitous 8th Avenue route, favored by the Glen Burnie Chamber of Commerce, and the Georgia Avenue alignment, which would destroy Glen Burnie's most picturesque residential street.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2000
The world as you have known it will end tomorrow. Oh sure, astronomers say the close alignment of the sun, the moon and every visible planet from Mercury to Saturn in tomorrow's sky will have no noticeable effect on life on Earth. But what do astronomers know? Have they checked with author Richard Noone? His book, "5/5/2000 Ice: The Ultimate Disaster," says the combined gravitational pull of all those celestial bodies could put both coasts of the United States underwater. He writes of cataclysmic shifts of the Earth's crust and movements of the polar ice caps.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
The Boy Scouts of America's ban on gay leaders is losing the organization more money -- this time from Maryland. This week, Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin, one of the largest private employers in the state, announced it will no longer provide philanthropic support to the Boy Scouts because of the nonprofit organization's "policies that discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation and religious affiliation. " Lockheed Martin announced its decision in a statement to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Wednesday.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
Maryland wants to continue annual assessments of students this year at a cost of about $6 million, even though the scores wouldn't be used to gauge school progress - one of the main reasons for giving the tests. State officials, in plans to be considered by the Maryland State Board of Education this month, said they would continue to give the Maryland School Assessments to comply with federal law. But, they said, the results won't provide reliable data for evaluating schools and teachers because the tests are geared to curriculum that's being phased out. The new common core curriculum, launched this year in every public school in the state, won't have new assessments to match until the 2014-2015 school year.
NEWS
August 21, 2013
It's really no surprise that top students at Maryland's highest-performing high schools are passing the Advanced Placement exams at rates far higher than their peers in the state's lower-performing schools. The test results reflect not just how much students have learned over the previous year in an AP class but how well their entire school experience has prepared them for college-level work. That's why raising AP pass rates across the board isn't just a matter of better facilities or teaching methods in a handful of advanced high school courses.
NEWS
July 20, 2013
In The Sun's recent editorial regarding the acquittal of George Zimmerman ("No justice," July 16), deemed outrageous is the assertion by Mr. Zimmerman's defense team that he never would have been charged if he were black. Later in the editorial, however, The Sun asserts that had Trayvon Martin been a white teenager in khakis and a button-down, Mr. Zimmerman would almost certainly not have jumped to the conclusions he did regarding his suspicions of Mr. Martin. This obvious double standard undermines your premise that racial prejudice is responsible for what happened that night, for the Sun has fallen prey to the same prejudices and ignorant presumptions regarding Mr. Zimmerman that you assert caused him to act as he did. Furthermore, your subtle implication that this matter is a typical case of white racism applied to a black victim is absurd but follows the lead of President Barack Obama, the Rev. Al Sharpton, Attorney General Eric Holder and the big media in manufacturing an explosive racial incident when no evidence exists of any such thing.
NEWS
By Renee A. Foose | July 17, 2013
The release of the Maryland School Assessment results - anticipated early next week - will surely send a ripple of shock to parents across the state. Educators are bracing for dips in math performance. At first glance, the scores will appear to indicate that student achievement has fallen, when in fact they reflect a mismatch between what is taught and what is tested. Maryland, like most other states throughout the nation, is in the process of transitioning to new reading and math curricula aligned to the Common Core State Standards, which show great promise for ensuring students are equipped with 21st century skills.
EXPLORE
April 16, 2013
I am writing in support of Michael Cornell and his next term as a Columbia Council Representative. I have been a neighbor of Mike's for the last 17 years. Mike has been one of the most productive Representatives I have encountered since moving to Columbia in 1986. I especially like his environmental initiatives and his consideration for all economic, racial, and cultural groups. Mike has also brought a measure of collegiality and facilitation to the Council. In short, Mike's vision aligns well with the original blueprint for Columbia - as a community based on social fairness, effective design, and global stewardship.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | November 18, 1992
The State Highway Administration unveiled four alternatives yesterday for the portion of Route 100 to be built between Route 104 and Interstate 95.Options A, B, C and D are intended to minimize wetlands problems unforeseen in the alignment the highway agency agreed to in 1989.That alignment called for a six-lane divided highway from U.S. 29 to I-95. It would have gone between Hunt Country Estates and the village of Montgomery Run and continue, just north of the Maryland School for the Deaf, to I-95.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | August 9, 1993
Now that the county's elected officials have made a recommendation on which side of protected wetlands Route 100 will be built, highway noise at one condominium building remains the only political loose end.When 10 of 12 County Council members and state legislators voted July 22 to put the highway south of Deep Run in southern Ellicott City, they did so on condition that the State Highway Administration deal with the noise concerns of condominium residents in...
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2012
Sandy is no ordinary hurricane. A remarkable configuration of weather systems are tugging on the storm system as it slogs up the eastern seaboard, slowing and widening the cyclone. A full moon will drag tides up the shore just as the storm whips the sea. And an area of low pressure is expected to pump in cold air from the west that could lead to several inches of snow in Western Maryland. "It's a very, very rare storm, and the way it is going to interact, the confluence of things coming together late in the season, is something we'll be taking a look at for years to come," said Steve Zubrick, science and operations officer at the National Weather Service's Sterling, Va., office.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2012
Ravens middle linebacker Ray Lewis' mind is bound to race wildly today, consumed with deducing the moves of unpredictable, enigmatic and gifted Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick. As the play clock ticks down and Vick barks out signals, Lewis will peer across the line of scrimmage to glean hints of what Vick might do next. Vick's impact is seemingly limited only by his imagination.  As the Ravens square off with the Eagles at Lincoln Financial Field, containing Vick is of paramount importance.
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