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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 19, 1995
Last fall, the Bowman Ensemble initiated an admirable project. The company, now in its sixth season in residence at McDonogh School, conducted acting workshops with high school students at the school. Out of these workshops, Matthew Ramsay, Bowman's resident playwright, forged a play called "Teen Blue," which was presented at McDonogh in January.I imagine the collaboration was enjoyable, but the production it engendered -- which has been revived, under Ramsay's direction, as part of Bowman's regular season -- is a fragmented, confusing work, rife with loose ends.
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NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | April 2, 1993
EASTON -- Two days after they netted 56 suspected illegal aliens at a Talbot County chicken processing plant, federal agents came up empty-handed yesterday during a similar raid at a broiler plant in Dorchester County.The reason? Company officials had already ordered 40 immigrant employees to stay home unless they could provide work credentials.On Wednesday, the day after U.S. Immigration and Naturalization agents raided the Allen Family Foods Inc. plant in Cordova, officials at ConAgra Broiler Co. in Hurlock reviewed employee records for discrepancies.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A bipartisan group of lawmakers, backed by an unusual coalition of business and civil rights organizations, began pushing legislation yesterday to repeal 5-year-old sanctions against employers who hire illegal aliens.The measure to repeal the provisions of the 1986 Simpson-Mazzoli immigration law was introduced in the Senate by Orrin G. Hatch, R-Utah, and Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., and in the House by Edward R. Roybal, D-Calif., and Bill Richardson, D-N.M.The sponsors of the legislation charged that threats of fines and jail terms against employers has led to widespread discrimination against Latinos and Asian-Americans.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1996
Are aliens visiting Earth and having their way with us? Watch "Nova" and decide for yourself.* " 'The Wizard of Oz' on Ice" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Oksana Baiul as Dorothy and Viktor Petrenko as the Scarecrow highlight this frozen version of the classic children's book and beloved MGM film. With ice skating already showing up just about everywhere on television, can a 24-hour-a-day, all-skating cable channel be far behind? CBS.* "Nova" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- This analytic, but still creepy, look at people who insist they've been abducted and, in some cases, sexually assaulted by aliens should get you thinking.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | October 17, 2001
OUR HOUSE of Representatives, facing the admittedly unenviable dilemma of what to do with aliens suspected of terrorist activity, has tried to adopt "compromise" legislation. How, you might ask, can legislators compromise when terrorists seek to kill us? That's because terrorists, almost by definition, have no Constitution to preserve, protect, defend or cherish. Our congressional representatives do. While the rest of us can scream and holler for suspects to be held indefinitely in the aftermath of Sept.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | April 7, 1992
THE LAST week of March, two D.C. City Council members took an interesting, unannounced trip to El Salvador.Frank Smith and Harry Thomas flew to San Salvador on March 23, without notifying either the American Embassy there or the Salvadoran Embassy here, and traveled around for a week, largely to formerly Marxist rebel-held territory.Members of the curious 16-member delegation, which included immigration activists from D.C., made it clear when they returned home a week later where their sympathies lay. They spoke of observing naked children running around town squares and of an undetonated bomb on church steps with the words on it: "Made in the U.S.A."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1997
If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then cable's USA network must be making NBC blush."Lassie" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- When TV Guide listed the Top 50 TV stars of all time, only one walked on all fours: a certain collie whose career dates back more than half a century. Here's the latest incarnation, a 1994 film starring Frederic Forrest, Helen Slater and Richard Farnsworth. The plot: Lassie looks out for a pair of unhappy tykes who have moved with their father and stepmother from the city back to the country farmhouse where their mother grew up. ABC."
NEWS
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | April 14, 2009
For PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii, PlayStation 2 and Windows PC. Alternate version for Nintendo DS. Rated 10-plus *** 1/2 (3 1/2 STARS) Every spring, a wave of kids' movie tie-in games, ranging from bland to terrible, invades stores and preys on unsuspecting parents. This year almost certainly will be no different. But before that wave crashes down, we have Monsters vs. Aliens, a game that not only is terrifically fun for kids, but legitimately good enough for their older siblings and parents to enjoy.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | January 28, 1995
How many ways are there to say that it's another slow Saturday night? That's one. It's even slower than last Saturday ,, night. That's two. Boy, is it slow on TV tonight. That's three . . .* "Aliens for Breakfast" (8-9 p.m., Channel 2) -- Shelley Duvall is one of the executive producers of this special, which means one thing: quality family entertainment. And once again, she doesn't disappoint. Ben Savage stars as Richard, a young boy who hates his new sneakers but loves his new cereal: Alien Crisp.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 28, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Against a background of sharp new controversies over the civil rights of aliens living in the United States, the Supreme Court stepped in yesterday to take on a key legal issue in a case from Baltimore.The case of Vincent P. Duane, a native Australian who was denied insurance on a Baltimore house in 1991 because he is not a U.S. citizen, tests whether the court will give aliens in this country the broad protection of a 125-year-old federal civil rights law.The court voted to hear that case in its term starting in the fall, with a ruling to come in 1996.
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