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Alice Waters

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By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | October 3, 2007
The Art of Simple Food By Alice Waters Clarkson Potter / 2007 / $35 If it weren't for Alice Waters, would "organic" be a household word? Would restaurants be boasting about their locally caught salmon, their heirloom tomatoes, their artisan cheese? Waters, the chef behind Berkeley, Calif.'s Chez Panisse, is credited with launching what has become a national awareness about where food comes from and how it's grown. With The Art of Simple Food, Waters has created not so much a cookbook as an introduction to her philosophy of food, a clinic in what she considers to be "the underlying principles of good cooking."
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NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | October 3, 2007
The Art of Simple Food By Alice Waters Clarkson Potter / 2007 / $35 If it weren't for Alice Waters, would "organic" be a household word? Would restaurants be boasting about their locally caught salmon, their heirloom tomatoes, their artisan cheese? Waters, the chef behind Berkeley, Calif.'s Chez Panisse, is credited with launching what has become a national awareness about where food comes from and how it's grown. With The Art of Simple Food, Waters has created not so much a cookbook as an introduction to her philosophy of food, a clinic in what she considers to be "the underlying principles of good cooking."
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | November 8, 1992
Alice Waters doesn't look like an evangelist. She's petite, with small, graceful hands and a soft voice. Her hair is close-cropped, her clothes subdued. She does not even look like the powerhouse behind what is arguably one of the most famous restaurants in the country, Chez Panisse, in Berkeley, Calif.But for more than 20 years, Ms. Waters has been preaching the gospel of freshness, purity and simplicity in food.For more than 20 years, she has been teaching consumers, budding chefs and restaurateurs, and even purveyors that the most direct route to diners' hearts is through "food that is simple and appealing -- fresh and good and exciting to eat."
NEWS
By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | April 29, 2007
Alice Waters and Chez Panisse The Romantic, Impractical, Often Eccentric, Ultimately Brilliant Making of a Food Revolution By Thomas McNamee Penguin Press / 400 pages / $27.95 Irrepressible Alice Waters was 27 when she decided that what she wanted most was a place where she and her friends could gather around a few tables, eat good food, drink a little (or a lot of) wine, inspire one another, fall in love, talk and thereby divert the world from its terrible path toward destruction, hatred, war, commercialization and alienation.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,Chicago Tribune | January 10, 2007
Grapefruit was first identified in Barbados and grows in clusters, like grapes. Some say this accounts for the name. But that's not conclusive. "Fruit experts disagree about the origins of grapefruit, how it was named and even what species it is. But there is little debate about how delicious it is," Alice Waters says in Chez Panisse Fruit. This low-calorie fruit (about 40 calories in a medium half) is high in vitamin C and potassium. Donna Pierce writes for the Chicago Tribune. Grapefruit Tips BUYING Select fruit with thin, smooth skin.
NEWS
By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | April 29, 2007
Alice Waters and Chez Panisse The Romantic, Impractical, Often Eccentric, Ultimately Brilliant Making of a Food Revolution By Thomas McNamee Penguin Press / 400 pages / $27.95 Irrepressible Alice Waters was 27 when she decided that what she wanted most was a place where she and her friends could gather around a few tables, eat good food, drink a little (or a lot of) wine, inspire one another, fall in love, talk and thereby divert the world from its terrible path toward destruction, hatred, war, commercialization and alienation.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | October 20, 1999
We think of summer as bounteous, and it is. But fall is the season of harvest -- a time when the earth gives up the plenty that will sustain us through the long, cold months ahead. Not the least of which is dessert. "I love winter desserts," says Alice Waters, restaurateur, cookbook author and maybe the country's most renowned advocate of seasonal tastes in season. Crisps, tarts, sorbets, granitas and compotes are among her favorites. "Crisps are fantastic, because you can adapt them to any kind of fruit or combination."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2011
We were just not really sent a memo forbidding us to use Goodnight Irene in headlines. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing recommendations for residents in states that might be affected by Hurricane Irene to minimize the potential for foodborne illnesses in the event of power outages, flooding, and other problems that could be associated with the storm. ( Food Safety News ) Here's Eli's review of Gino's Burgers & Chicken (Adventures of a Koodie)
FEATURES
October 13, 1999
Peanuts are not just found in peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches. Try Trailblazing Texas Peanuts (pictured above): Combine 1 tablespoon chili powder, 1/2 teaspoon paprika, 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper and set aside. Place 3 1/2 cups cocktail peanuts (about 1 pound) in dish and microwave on high for 6 minutes, stirring peanuts every 2 minutes. Sprinkle spices over peanuts and stir until well-coated.From the Texas Peanut Producers Board.Getting kids to eatTop chefs offer their tips for getting children to eat in the October issue of Sesame Street Parents magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kate Campbell | June 23, 2005
Civil War Days Visitors to Gettysburg, Pa., Saturday through July 3 can participate in so many Civil War activities they'll believe the 1863 battle is still on. The annual Gettysburg Civil War Heritage Days has made the American Bus Association's Top 100 events list 10 times in the past 20 years, and this 23rd edition will feature bands, lectures, tours and re-enactments. "Confederates Take the Schriver House," a living history performance, reproduces the seizure of George Schriver's home on Baltimore Street, complete with soldiers crouched in the sharpshooters' nest in the building's garret.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,Chicago Tribune | January 10, 2007
Grapefruit was first identified in Barbados and grows in clusters, like grapes. Some say this accounts for the name. But that's not conclusive. "Fruit experts disagree about the origins of grapefruit, how it was named and even what species it is. But there is little debate about how delicious it is," Alice Waters says in Chez Panisse Fruit. This low-calorie fruit (about 40 calories in a medium half) is high in vitamin C and potassium. Donna Pierce writes for the Chicago Tribune. Grapefruit Tips BUYING Select fruit with thin, smooth skin.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | October 20, 1999
We think of summer as bounteous, and it is. But fall is the season of harvest -- a time when the earth gives up the plenty that will sustain us through the long, cold months ahead. Not the least of which is dessert. "I love winter desserts," says Alice Waters, restaurateur, cookbook author and maybe the country's most renowned advocate of seasonal tastes in season. Crisps, tarts, sorbets, granitas and compotes are among her favorites. "Crisps are fantastic, because you can adapt them to any kind of fruit or combination."
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | November 8, 1992
Alice Waters doesn't look like an evangelist. She's petite, with small, graceful hands and a soft voice. Her hair is close-cropped, her clothes subdued. She does not even look like the powerhouse behind what is arguably one of the most famous restaurants in the country, Chez Panisse, in Berkeley, Calif.But for more than 20 years, Ms. Waters has been preaching the gospel of freshness, purity and simplicity in food.For more than 20 years, she has been teaching consumers, budding chefs and restaurateurs, and even purveyors that the most direct route to diners' hearts is through "food that is simple and appealing -- fresh and good and exciting to eat."
NEWS
By Amy Scattergood and Amy Scattergood,Los Angeles Times | May 13, 2007
The sun moves over the Saturday Pico farmers' market in Santa Monica, Calif., filtering through the canopy that protects the delicate herbs and baby lettuces at the Kenter Canyon Farms stall. The salad of market lettuces that we take for granted on the menu these days, an edible bouquet that tastes as good as it looks, effectively began in owner Andrea Crawford's garden. To be more accurate, Alice Waters' garden. Twenty-six years ago, Crawford began growing lettuces and herbs for Chez Panisse, literally in Waters' backyard.
NEWS
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,Orlando Sentinel | January 30, 1994
Title: "James Beard: A Biography"Author: Robert ClarkPublisher: HarperCollinsLength, price: 357 pages, $27.50 The adage that the more things change, the more they stay the same is apparent in America's attitudes toward food -- at least according to Robert Clark in his biography of the late cookbook author, writer and schmoozemeister James Beard.In making his assessment of American food mores, Mr. Clark takes the long view, covering not just the 46 years of Beard's career, but more than 120 years of societal and dietary changes.
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