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By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | September 10, 2006
After This Alice McDermott Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 288 pages / $24.00 There is the temptation, after reading Alice McDermott, to read nothing else for the longest time - to hold every exquisite word of her most exquisite novels in your head. There is the temptation to declare that she, along with Michael Ondaatje, is the best living writer of our age. That she exercises patience, compassion and wisdom where others emphasize strut, that she trusts herself with the power of scenes over the inflated intricacies of complicated plot.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
The 2014 Baltimore Book Festival will feature a lineup that includes a National Book Award-winning author, a novelist whose previous work was made into an Academy Award-nominated film, a popular sports broadcaster and a food writer who has penned a memoir with recipes. Highlights of the 19 t h festival, which will be held from Sept. 26-28, were announced Tuesday in a news release by the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts. Featured authors and books will include: former National Book Award winner Alice McDermott reading from her most recent novel, "Someone," an elegant tone poem that traces the life of an ordinary woman; Andre Dubus III's highly praised collection of four novellas, "Dirty Love"; the father-son memoir "Forgotten Sundays" penned by WBAL-TV sports director Gerry Sandusky; and "Slices of Life," by food writer Leah Eskin, whose column runs in The Baltimore Sun's Wednesday Taste section.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 17, 1999
Much has been written about "Charming Billy," by Alice McDermott (Farrar Straus, 280 pages, $22). On these pages a year ago, Chris Kridler hailed it for the "exquisitely detailed observations" that constitute "a delicately assembled and wistful scrapbook ... [that] unravels the emotional legacy passed from one generation to the next." Nearly a year later came its nomination, then selection, for the National Book Award for fiction. Much more was written. Yet I had not read it.Now I have, and enjoyed it immensely.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
Because the Baltimore-area novelist Alice McDermott possesses a painterly eye that delights in the way things look and sound and smell and taste, it can be easy to miss her underlying focus. For the National Book Award-winning author, each small sensory jolt that originates in this world is a gateway to a more incorporeal realm. "Marie takes a spiritual journey in this novel," McDermott says of the heroine of her newly released book, "Someone: A Novel. " "She goes from not understanding at all to not quite understanding to understanding a little bit. Early in the book, her brother makes an absolutely outrageous proposition from the Gospel of Matthew, that all the hairs on our heads are counted and that we're not alone.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | April 1, 1992
Bethesda -- Alice McDermott is 38 and her three novels have earned her an enviable literary reputation, but family members back in New York still think that fiction writing is a pretty strange profession to have chosen. The truth is, she's inclined to agree.There was, for instance, that day last fall when she drove from her Bethesda home to the Sudbrook Park area of Baltimore County to watch the filming of "That Night," which was based on her second novel. She was fascinated seeing how Adana Road had been re-created into an archetypal Long Island suburban street of the early 1960s.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and SUN STAFF | January 1, 1999
Customers have ripped it off the shelves, fought over it, thrown tantrums when clerks have told them it's sold out."Charming Billy," a quiet work of literature by local author Alice McDermott, has been in such intense demand since it won the National Book Award in November that it was absent from the shelves of almost every bookstore in the region during the holiday shopping crush.Louie's Bookstore Cafe on North Charles Street has sold out twice in the past month. Bibelot bookstore in Timonium has 42 people waiting for it. At Border's in Towson, the waiting list has 25 names.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1999
When it was announced earlier this year that Maryland author and 1998 National Book Award winner Alice McDermott was set to be host of a dinner and lecture in Howard County, the response was immediate: a sold-out event.The $35 tickets to tonight's Supper at Six program, an annual Maryland author event sponsored by the Howard County Library and the Maryland Center for the Book, sold out quickly as fans of McDermott's lyrical prose clamored to reserve seats at the dinner and talk.More than 275 people are expected to attend the dinner, to be held at Ten Oaks Ballroom in Clarksville.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1998
Alice McDermott's classroom at Johns Hopkins University was empty yesterday. She was in New York, at bookstores reading from her novel, "Charming Billy." Tonight in the Big Apple, she'll join other authors who will be listening for their names when judges announce the winner of this year's National Book Award for fiction.Since Tom Wolfe's new book, "A Man in Full," was nominated, the race is not neck-and-neck, McDermott didn't write an acceptance speech and, instead of being tense, she plans to enjoy it. Just thinking that she'll finally get to meet John Updike, and in such circumstances, makes her giggle.
NEWS
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun staff | January 4, 1998
"Charming Billy," by Alice McDermott. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 256 pages. $21.Alice McDermott is a writer of such exquisitely detailed observations that every anecdote in "Charming Billy" is like a photograph in a family album.Her latest novel doesn't lasso the reader with a powerful plot that pulls strongly toward the end of the book. Instead, it invites slow and satisfying rumination. Framed by a funeral, Billy's, the story deciphers not just him but his entire extended Irish-American family.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Helene Stapinski and By Helene Stapinski,Special to the Sun | November 24, 2002
Child of My Heart, by Alice McDermott. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 208 pages. $23. Alice McDermott writes beautiful sentences. She takes the most mundane or awful sights and turns them into poetry. In describing a drunken neighbor asleep on his lawn, his pants down around his ankles, she writes: "I got a quick, bone-chilling glimpse of a mound of a pale backside, as gray and lonesome as a sand dune in winter." Like her National Book Award winner, Charming Billy, McDermott's new book is set on the east end of Long Island.
NEWS
By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | September 10, 2006
After This Alice McDermott Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 288 pages / $24.00 There is the temptation, after reading Alice McDermott, to read nothing else for the longest time - to hold every exquisite word of her most exquisite novels in your head. There is the temptation to declare that she, along with Michael Ondaatje, is the best living writer of our age. That she exercises patience, compassion and wisdom where others emphasize strut, that she trusts herself with the power of scenes over the inflated intricacies of complicated plot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Helene Stapinski and By Helene Stapinski,Special to the Sun | November 24, 2002
Child of My Heart, by Alice McDermott. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 208 pages. $23. Alice McDermott writes beautiful sentences. She takes the most mundane or awful sights and turns them into poetry. In describing a drunken neighbor asleep on his lawn, his pants down around his ankles, she writes: "I got a quick, bone-chilling glimpse of a mound of a pale backside, as gray and lonesome as a sand dune in winter." Like her National Book Award winner, Charming Billy, McDermott's new book is set on the east end of Long Island.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and By Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2000
Alice McDermott, author of "Charming Billy," the 1998 National Book Award winner, is in such great demand on the speaking circuit that it took two years for Carroll Community College officials to schedule her for this year's Random House Book Fair. Children's author Mary Downing Hahn, who lives an hour away in Columbia, was easier. And so was Da Chen, whose book, "Colors of the Mountain," is being compared with Frank McCourt's "Angela's Ashes." McDermott, Hahn and Chen will make up the expanded book fair's Literary Week, which starts Tuesday at the community college.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2000
For anyone who has ever dreamed of meeting a famous author, it doesn't get much easier than attending next week's Random House Book Fair, an annual fund-raiser for the Carroll Community College Foundation. The literary lineup includes nationally known authors Mary Downing Hahn, Alice McDermott, Da Chen, Peter Straub and Michael J. Gelb. The event, which begins Tuesday, features author lectures and book signings, workshops, children's activities, book sales, a book auction and music. The week culminates in a book fair at Carroll Community College, 1601 Washington Road, from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 11. "The Random House Book Fair has grown by leaps and bounds," said Paula Langmead, fair chairwoman.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2000
For anyone who has ever dreamed of meeting a famous author, it doesn't get much easier than attending next week's Random House Book Fair, an annual fund-raiser for the Carroll Community College Foundation. The literary lineup includes nationally known authors Mary Downing Hahn, Alice McDermott, Da Chen, Peter Straub and Michael J. Gelb. The event, which begins Tuesday, features author lectures and book signings, workshops, children's activities, book sales, a book auction and music. The week culminates in a book fair at Carroll Community College, 1601 Washington Road, from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 11. "The Random House Book Fair has grown by leaps and bounds," said Paula Langmead, fair chairwoman.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1999
When it was announced earlier this year that Maryland author and 1998 National Book Award winner Alice McDermott was set to be host of a dinner and lecture in Howard County, the response was immediate: a sold-out event.The $35 tickets to tonight's Supper at Six program, an annual Maryland author event sponsored by the Howard County Library and the Maryland Center for the Book, sold out quickly as fans of McDermott's lyrical prose clamored to reserve seats at the dinner and talk.More than 275 people are expected to attend the dinner, to be held at Ten Oaks Ballroom in Clarksville.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and By Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2000
Alice McDermott, author of "Charming Billy," the 1998 National Book Award winner, is in such great demand on the speaking circuit that it took two years for Carroll Community College officials to schedule her for this year's Random House Book Fair. Children's author Mary Downing Hahn, who lives an hour away in Columbia, was easier. And so was Da Chen, whose book, "Colors of the Mountain," is being compared with Frank McCourt's "Angela's Ashes." McDermott, Hahn and Chen will make up the expanded book fair's Literary Week, which starts Tuesday at the community college.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2000
For anyone who has ever dreamed of meeting a famous author, it doesn't get much easier than attending next week's Random House Book Fair, an annual fund-raiser for the Carroll Community College Foundation. The literary lineup includes nationally known authors Mary Downing Hahn, Alice McDermott, Da Chen, Peter Straub and Michael J. Gelb. The event, which begins Tuesday, features author lectures and book signings, workshops, children's activities, book sales, a book auction and music. The week culminates in a book fair at Carroll Community College, 1601 Washington Road, from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 11. "The Random House Book Fair has grown by leaps and bounds," said Paula Langmead, fair chairwoman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 17, 1999
Much has been written about "Charming Billy," by Alice McDermott (Farrar Straus, 280 pages, $22). On these pages a year ago, Chris Kridler hailed it for the "exquisitely detailed observations" that constitute "a delicately assembled and wistful scrapbook ... [that] unravels the emotional legacy passed from one generation to the next." Nearly a year later came its nomination, then selection, for the National Book Award for fiction. Much more was written. Yet I had not read it.Now I have, and enjoyed it immensely.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and SUN STAFF | January 1, 1999
Customers have ripped it off the shelves, fought over it, thrown tantrums when clerks have told them it's sold out."Charming Billy," a quiet work of literature by local author Alice McDermott, has been in such intense demand since it won the National Book Award in November that it was absent from the shelves of almost every bookstore in the region during the holiday shopping crush.Louie's Bookstore Cafe on North Charles Street has sold out twice in the past month. Bibelot bookstore in Timonium has 42 people waiting for it. At Border's in Towson, the waiting list has 25 names.
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