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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,sun staff | August 3, 1997
"Here on Earth," by Alice Hoffman. G.P. Putnam's Sons, 304 pages, $23.95. Alice Hoffman has written a twelfth novel, better known as "Wuthering Heights."Whoops! Actually, the title is "Here on Earth," but the story is unmistakably Emily Bronte's, updated and refined. (Oddly, the press notes make no mention of this parallel, but if it's a coincidence, then "Here on Earth" is strong evidence of reincarnation.)Hoffman's engrossing book is a turn-of-the-millennium gothic tale. Unlike Bronte, whose lost souls seemed almost magically motivated, Hoffman grounds her characters in logic as well as mysticism.
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NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[Special to The Sun] | April 20, 2008
The Third Angel By Alice Hoffman Shaye Areheart Books/Crown / 282 pages / $25 Is there an American novelist who understands the complicated and multifaceted nature of love in all its manifestations - romantic, familial, platonic - better than Alice Hoffman? Her last novel, Skylight Confessions, was a brilliant, haunting pictorial of broken families and broken hearts and how they are - or are not - mended. Hoffman's 20th novel, The Third Angel, is a triptych about the overwhelming and all-consuming power of love that can extend even beyond the grave.
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SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1997
It's shortly after 8 a.m. and several hundred workers are already swarming over the skeleton of the Ravens' stadium, clanging on iron bars, pumping concrete and hoisting steel girders with chugging, diesel cranes.Into this maelstrom steps Alice Hoffman, the state's chief overseer of the $220 million project. Dressed in a peach, short-sleeved shirt, floral vest and brown slacks, she has traded her dress shoes for a pair of muddy boots. She also has put on a white hard hat and tinted safety glasses.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | January 14, 2007
Skylight Confessions Alice Hoffman Little, Brown & Co. / 262 pages / $24.95 Magic and superstition are mainstays in the lives of most of us, even if we are reluctant to admit it. We believe in fate, in luck, in worlds beyond our own, in the power of love to alter our lives. We absent-mindedly toss the spilled salt over our shoulder, avoid the open ladder, step away from the black cat, take care with the number 13. We have talismans we hope will protect us or bring us good fortune. We wish on stars and pluck the petals of daisies and pray for true love to find us and lead us to happiness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wendy Smith and Wendy Smith,Los Angeles Times | April 17, 2005
The Ice Queen: A Novel By Alice Hoffman. Little, Brown. 214 pages. $23.95. Throughout Alice Hoffman's long career, her prose has shimmered with echoes of myths and fables as her fiction has explored decidedly modern individuals in often gritty situations. It's a tricky balance. In lesser works such as Local Girls, the magical undertones feel forced, and even such solid efforts as The River King display Hoffman's tendency to overdo lovely descriptions of the natural world. But when the mix is right, as in the unsparing Blue Diary, she's one of contemporary American literature's most satisfying and thoughtful practitioners.
NEWS
By Joan Mooney | May 3, 1992
TURTLE MOON.Alice Hoffman.Putnam.256 pages. $21.95. The extraordinary events of Alice Hoffman's books can be set off by something as simple as the weather. The author of "Turtle Moon" understands that extreme heat and humidity can make people do things they would never ordinarily do -- something to which anyone who has lived through a summer in Baltimore can attest.The novel is set in the small town of Verity, the most humid spot in Eastern Florida. But it's more than that. People who live in Verity realize "something is wrong with the month of May. It isn't the humidity, or even the heat, which is so fierce and sudden it can make grown men cry. Every May, when the sea turtles begin their migration across West Main Street, mistaking the glow of streetlights for the moon, people go a little bit crazy."
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 1, 1994
It's summertime and the living is not easy for the book world. On the movie screen, Jack Nicholson is transformed from a civilized editor to a werewolf just to fight off the sharks in the business.In real life, the gap between rich and poor writers is now greater than that between CEOs and drones. The New Yorker just chronicled the plight of James Wilcox whose six novels have produced rave reviews, small sales and shrinking advances. When visited recently, Mr. Wilcox ''had just finished the last of three meals he'd extracted from 18 pieces of chicken he bought at Key Food for $3.40.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[Special to The Sun] | April 20, 2008
The Third Angel By Alice Hoffman Shaye Areheart Books/Crown / 282 pages / $25 Is there an American novelist who understands the complicated and multifaceted nature of love in all its manifestations - romantic, familial, platonic - better than Alice Hoffman? Her last novel, Skylight Confessions, was a brilliant, haunting pictorial of broken families and broken hearts and how they are - or are not - mended. Hoffman's 20th novel, The Third Angel, is a triptych about the overwhelming and all-consuming power of love that can extend even beyond the grave.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | January 14, 2007
Skylight Confessions Alice Hoffman Little, Brown & Co. / 262 pages / $24.95 Magic and superstition are mainstays in the lives of most of us, even if we are reluctant to admit it. We believe in fate, in luck, in worlds beyond our own, in the power of love to alter our lives. We absent-mindedly toss the spilled salt over our shoulder, avoid the open ladder, step away from the black cat, take care with the number 13. We have talismans we hope will protect us or bring us good fortune. We wish on stars and pluck the petals of daisies and pray for true love to find us and lead us to happiness.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 19, 1997
For the second time in four years, students from Francis Scott Key Elementary-Middle School in Locust Point captured one of four top awards at the Fourth Annual Symposium for Environment and Education last month in New Hampshire.The group of 17 students and their science teacher, Evelyn Walls, studied sample data and worked with the Maryland Stadium Authority's project manager, Alice Hoffman, to determine how to control runoff from the football stadium construction site into the Chesapeake Bay.The Key students earned a $2,000 prize, which will be used for educational materials.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wendy Smith and Wendy Smith,Los Angeles Times | April 17, 2005
The Ice Queen: A Novel By Alice Hoffman. Little, Brown. 214 pages. $23.95. Throughout Alice Hoffman's long career, her prose has shimmered with echoes of myths and fables as her fiction has explored decidedly modern individuals in often gritty situations. It's a tricky balance. In lesser works such as Local Girls, the magical undertones feel forced, and even such solid efforts as The River King display Hoffman's tendency to overdo lovely descriptions of the natural world. But when the mix is right, as in the unsparing Blue Diary, she's one of contemporary American literature's most satisfying and thoughtful practitioners.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1997
It's shortly after 8 a.m. and several hundred workers are already swarming over the skeleton of the Ravens' stadium, clanging on iron bars, pumping concrete and hoisting steel girders with chugging, diesel cranes.Into this maelstrom steps Alice Hoffman, the state's chief overseer of the $220 million project. Dressed in a peach, short-sleeved shirt, floral vest and brown slacks, she has traded her dress shoes for a pair of muddy boots. She also has put on a white hard hat and tinted safety glasses.
NEWS
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,sun staff | August 3, 1997
"Here on Earth," by Alice Hoffman. G.P. Putnam's Sons, 304 pages, $23.95. Alice Hoffman has written a twelfth novel, better known as "Wuthering Heights."Whoops! Actually, the title is "Here on Earth," but the story is unmistakably Emily Bronte's, updated and refined. (Oddly, the press notes make no mention of this parallel, but if it's a coincidence, then "Here on Earth" is strong evidence of reincarnation.)Hoffman's engrossing book is a turn-of-the-millennium gothic tale. Unlike Bronte, whose lost souls seemed almost magically motivated, Hoffman grounds her characters in logic as well as mysticism.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 1, 1994
It's summertime and the living is not easy for the book world. On the movie screen, Jack Nicholson is transformed from a civilized editor to a werewolf just to fight off the sharks in the business.In real life, the gap between rich and poor writers is now greater than that between CEOs and drones. The New Yorker just chronicled the plight of James Wilcox whose six novels have produced rave reviews, small sales and shrinking advances. When visited recently, Mr. Wilcox ''had just finished the last of three meals he'd extracted from 18 pieces of chicken he bought at Key Food for $3.40.
NEWS
By Joan Mooney | May 3, 1992
TURTLE MOON.Alice Hoffman.Putnam.256 pages. $21.95. The extraordinary events of Alice Hoffman's books can be set off by something as simple as the weather. The author of "Turtle Moon" understands that extreme heat and humidity can make people do things they would never ordinarily do -- something to which anyone who has lived through a summer in Baltimore can attest.The novel is set in the small town of Verity, the most humid spot in Eastern Florida. But it's more than that. People who live in Verity realize "something is wrong with the month of May. It isn't the humidity, or even the heat, which is so fierce and sudden it can make grown men cry. Every May, when the sea turtles begin their migration across West Main Street, mistaking the glow of streetlights for the moon, people go a little bit crazy."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 24, 1998
The first game at the Ravens' stadium at Camden Yards is months away, but the lights are on.The 612 field lights, suspended nearly 200 feet in the air from light towers, are burning 24 hours a day as workers prepare to calibrate them. Each of the 1,500-watt bulbs has to burn for at least 100 hours before workers can aim and calibrate the beams to network television specifications."It's called the burn-in period," said Maryland Stadium Authority project manager Alice Hoffman.This week, workers will begin aiming the bulbs and testing their brightness -- a process that might take a week to complete.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1998
Workers pounded a hole in an interior wall of the new Ravens stadium Tuesday to rescue a litter of kittens apparently born there and inadvertently sealed in last week.Maryland Stadium Authority project manager Alice Hoffman said workers heard meows coming from the area, an upper-deck bathroom, and investigated. By climbing to the top of the wall and shining lights down, they discovered five kittens.Their mother had apparently climbed into the wall through a gap that was repaired May 29. The mother apparently was not in the wall at the time the masonry was replaced, but the kittens were.
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